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European Alps

European Alps

Ever dream of skiing the high peaks and endless runs of the European Alps? Well, ski bunny, you better book your flight and hop on the gondola sooner rather than later. Because the Alps are at a lower altitude than many other mountain ranges, they are much more susceptible to the potential effects of global warming, and temperatures in the region are increasing at more than twice the global average. Some predictions give the glaciers only until 2050 before they disappear. 960 1280

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Florida Everglades

Florida Everglades

Encroaching development is just one of many threats to the Everglades, the largest subtropical wilderness in the US. Since 1900 the Everglades have been cut in half, and 14 species of animals that call its cypress swamps, mangroves and sawgrass home are now on the brink of extinction. 960 1280

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Venice, Italy

Venice, Italy

The 118 small islands that make up the city of Venice have been sinking for centuries, but rising sea levels have caused many to wonder how much longer the Floating City will stay afloat. 960 1280

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Tuvalu

Tuvalu

The tiny Polynesian nation of Tuvalu, located halfway between Australia and Hawaii, could be completely swallowed by the Pacific Ocean if sea levels continue to rise. The highest point of the 9-island country (encompassing only 10 square miles) is only about 15 feet above sea level, and even a rise of a few inches could have devastating consequences for the tiny nation.  960 1280

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Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa

A change in rainfall patterns and an increase in land use have caused the Sahara desert to gradually advance southward. If the growth continues, it could drastically change the landscape of Sub-Saharan Africa. 960 1280

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Timbuktu, Mali

Timbuktu, Mali

The 3 mosques of Timbuktu in Mali, built during a golden age between the 14th and 16th centuries, are UNESCO World Heritage sites. Their walls are mainly built of mud, and any increase in temperature or rainfall could spell disaster for these incredible pieces of history. 960 1280

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Patagonia, Argentina

Patagonia, Argentina

The pristine landscape of Patagonia in Argentina could look drastically different to future visitors. The awe-inspiring glaciers have already begun to shrink because of increases in temperatures and decreases in precipitation.  960 1280

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French Vineyards

French Vineyards

Better start stocking up on French wine. Temperature increases in traditional winemaking regions of France, such as Bordeaux, have caused winemakers to worry. Grapes are hyper-sensitive to climate change, and any increase in temperature could be detrimental to the vines … eliminating the production of varieties that have been a mainstay of the region for centuries. 960 1280

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Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Mount Kilimanjaro could look drastically different in our lifetime. The snow is rapidly melting, and scientists predict that it will only be white-capped for another 15 years. 960 1280

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Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

The state of Alaska currently has more than 100,000 glaciers, but 95% of them are shrinking. The global rise in temperature is happening much faster at higher latitudes, and Alaska’s annual average temperature is increasing twice as fast as the rest of the US. As Glacier Bay gets warmer, snowy winter scenes like this one will be harder to come by. 960 1280

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Tikal, Guatemala

Tikal, Guatemala

The structures of Tikal, one of the largest archaeological sites of the Mayan civilization, are mostly made of soft limestone -- soft enough to erode when subjected to rain and wind. Tourists aren’t helping, either; many have been known to leave with small stone “souvenirs.” 960 1280

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Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica

Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica

The Monteverde cloud forest in the mountains of Costa Rica has become a major ecotourism destination because of its incredible biodiversity. Global warming, however, has scientists worried. Many have warned there will be a decline in the low-level clouds that this lush ecosystem is famous for, with the resulting rise in temperatures threatening many plants and animals. 960 1280

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Maldives

Maldives

Located southwest of India, this archipelago of 1,190 tiny islands and atolls is the lowest-lying country in the world, making it particularly susceptible to a rise in sea levels. Roughly 80% of the country is less than 4 feet above sea level, and many inhabitants live along the coast. If sea levels continue to rise, the Republic of Maldives will be the first nation to disappear into the ocean. 960 1280

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Zahara de la Sierra, Spain

Zahara de la Sierra, Spain

This small town in the hills of Andalusia is famous for its green mountains, pastures and olive groves. The temperature in Andalusia, however, is expected to increase along with the average annual rainfall, which would wipe out the orchards and lush countryside. 960 1280

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Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park has already undergone a significant transformation. The Montana landscape was once home to 150 monstrous glaciers; now there are only 27. Some scientists predict that they will be gone by 2030. 960 1280

Trey Ratcliff through Flickr Creative Commons  

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

The world’s biggest structure made by living organisms, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef can be seen from outer space and is a UNESCO World Heritage site. But the survival of the reef is threatened by rising ocean temperatures and mass coral bleaching, and it could be completely gone in our lifetime. 960 1280

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Rock Creek Park

Rock Creek Park

Founded in 1890 as one of the first federal parks, Rock Creek is an oasis of natural solace and beauty within our nation's capital, in the northwest part of the district. 960 1280

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Shenandoah National Park

Shenandoah National Park

Less than a hundred miles from the city, visitors can begin their trip to Shenandoah by cruising on the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains along Skyline Drive. 960 1280

Jon Bilous / iStock  

Shenandoah's Old Rag Mountain

Shenandoah's Old Rag Mountain

One of the Shenandoah'€™s most popular day hikes is summiting Old Rag Mountain. Old Rag's exposed rocky summit beckons outdoor photography, though some may be more inclined after hiking it to just enjoy the view. 960 1280

Will Hollerith  

Shenandoah for Fall Color

Shenandoah for Fall Color

The best time to visit Shenandoah is during fall when the leaves of the forests turn red, brown and gold. 960 1280

Will Hollerith  

Chesapeake Bay

Chesapeake Bay

Traveling through the largest estuary in North America can take visitors through significant cities, colonial towns, farms, and fishing villages where they can kayak, fish, sample seafood or simply slow down to take in the scenery. 960 1280

Will Hollerith  

Vital Waters

Vital Waters

Traveling through the largest estuary in North America can take visitors through significant cities, colonial towns, farms, and fishing villages where they can kayak, fish, sample seafood or simply slow down to take in the scenery. 960 1280

Will Hollerith  

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge

A kayak or canoe is the best way to explore Blackwater's wetlands and to glimpse the bald eagle in its natural habitat. This protected area southeast of D.C. and across the Chesapeake Bay is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 960 1280

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Colonial Parkway

Colonial Parkway

This 23-mile scenic byway connects Jamestowne, Williamsburg and Yorktown, the three points which make up Virginia's Historic Triangle. 960 1280

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George Washington National Forest

George Washington National Forest

Managed by the National Forest Service, this forest and the Jefferson National Forest together form one of the largest stretches of public land in the Eastern U.S. Vast tracts of forested mountain terrain make the trails of this national forest a popular destination for hiking, mountain biking, and especially trail running. 960 1280

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napa valley, highway 29, road trip, california
Highway 29

Highway 29

Take California State Route 29 to see some of the region’s best vineyards and wineries. Through Napa Valley, Highway 29 passes through Calistoga, St. Helena, Rutherford, Oakville, Yountville and Napa. 960 1280
Silverado Trail

Silverado Trail

Hit the road early to capture the serene vineyards along the Silverado Trail, a scenic route along the eastern edge of Napa Valley. Most locals suggest taking this route to avoid traffic on California State Route 29, which runs parallel to the Trail. 960 1280

seligmanwaite, Flickr  

Wine Country

Wine Country

Northern California's wine country beckons visitors with hundreds of wineries spread across 3 counties. 960 1280

By John Morgan [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Castello di Amorosa

Castello di Amorosa

Castello di Amorosa Winery is located near Calistoga, CA. The 121,000-square-foot medieval replica castle includes 107 rooms and 8 levels above and below ground. Among its many features, it has a moat, drawbridge, defensive towers, interior courtyard, chapel, torture chamber and a great hall. Visitors to the vineyard can sample the wines sold at the castle. 960 1280

Jim G., Flickr  

Cabernet

Cabernet

Northern California's climate is ideal for growing grapes like these ripe ones used to make a fine cabernet. 960 1280

By Jakob federer (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Beringer Rhine House

Beringer Rhine House

Make a stop at the Beringer Rhine House -- Napa Valley’s oldest continuously operating winery. Enjoy the award-winning wines, rich history and beautifully landscaped grounds. 960 1280

Chuck O'Rear  

California Wine

California Wine

The best way to appreciate Northern California's wine country is to sample the goods along the way. 960 1280

By Brian Solis [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Old Faithful Geyser of California

Old Faithful Geyser of California

While you’re on your road trip, we suggestion stopping by the Old Faithful Geyser of California, located in Calistoga, CA. It’s just one of many roadside attractions you’ll see along the way. 960 1280

Kunal Mukherjee, flickr  

Picturesque Vineyards

Picturesque Vineyards

Bring along a camera for photo opportunities in the acres of rolling vineyards in Napa and Sonoma. 960 1280

By Rennett Stowe from USA (Napa Valley Vineyard) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Staglin Family Vineyard

Staglin Family Vineyard

The Staglin Family Vineyard, a family-owned Napa Valley winery in Rutherford, CA, produces a variety of wines, including Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sangiovese and a Bordeaux-style blend. Take a guided tour of the winery, and then at the end of the tour, experience an intimate tasting of Cabernet Sauvignons produced on the estate. 960 1280

Kopol Bonick Studio  

Wine Production

Wine Production

These terraced vineyards in Sonoma rely on biodynamic agricultural techniques to produce local wine. 960 1280
Oxbow Public Market

Oxbow Public Market

Go local! Visit the Oxbow Public Market in Napa Valley to sample the local community’s best, including fresh food, wine and cheese. Take Highway 29 to the city of Napa; take the 1st Street Exit (bear right to head east); and look for signs marked ‘Oxbow Public Market’. 960 1280

Oxbow Public Market  

Merlot

Merlot

Pre-veraison, these grapes will be used to make Merlot once they ripen. 960 1280

By David Huang (Flickr: Merlot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Sterling Vineyard

Sterling Vineyard

Several vineyards, including the Sterling Vineyard (pictured) in Calistoga, CA, are fun getaways for tourists.  See picturesque views from their aerial tram. Guests can also travel the grounds by foot. And with a glass of wine in hand, stroll through art galleries and elevated walkways that allow visitors to see the winemaking process from grape to glass. 960 1280

Jim G., Flickr  

Years of Preparation

Years of Preparation

These vines in Sonoma have been used for growing grapes for nearly 90 years. 960 1280

By dynamosquito (Flickr: Ceps) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Di Rosa Preserve

Di Rosa Preserve

While you’re on the road, we suggest you visit the Di Rosa Preserve, a 35-acre lake and wildlife. The area is not only rich in an array of flora, fauna and wildlife, but it’s also the canvas to display a broad range of art created by Bay Area artists. Art aficionados can walk the grounds to see art work in the Main Gallery, Gatehouse Gallery, Historic Residence, Courtyard, North Lawn and Sculpture Meadow.  It’s an art lover’s paradise. 960 1280

collectmoments, Flickr  

The Grapes

The Grapes

These grapes may become a bottle of your favorite California wine, but you'll have to wait a few years to try it. 960 1280

By Tomás Castelazo (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons  

Downtown Napa

Downtown Napa

If wine tasting and tours isn’t you’re thing, then make a pit stop in Downtown Napa. The area has dozens of shops, dessert cafes, bars, restaurants and spas. Hotels and B&Bs are available in the area. It’s a perfect home-base location for visitors to explore nearby vineyards and mix with the locals. 960 1280

Napa Downtown Association  

Mud Bath

Mud Bath

Unwind and relax with a mud bath at one of several spas located in Napa Valley, including Meadowood, Dr. Wilkinson’s Hot Springs, Golden Haven Hot Springs Spa, Calistoga Spa Hot Springs, Indian Springs Resort and Roman Spa Motel. 960 1280

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