ocean, beach, florida, sunset, dock
Clearwater Beach

Clearwater Beach

One of America’s finest white-sand beaches, Clearwater Beach spans a narrow, 3-mile stretch of the Pinellas Peninsula on the Gulf Coast. Clearwater’s proximity to Tampa offers visitors ample activities to enjoy, including beach volleyball, parasailing, a dolphin-watching cruise and a fun fishing excursion. 960 1280

Image Source/ Getty Images  

Clearwater Beach

Clearwater Beach

Piers are a Florida shore staple, and Clearwater Beach is no different. Walk to the end of the famed Pier 60 to take in one of the state’s many beautiful sunsets, whether it’s the one in the sky or the daily festival of the same name, which is held 365 days a year. 960 1280

Matthew Paulson via Flickr Creative Commons NC ND 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Sanibel Island

Sanibel Island

Known as one of the best shelling locations thanks to the abundant seashells that wash ashore from the Gulf of Mexico, Sanibel Island attracts collectors from all over the world. 960 1280

Gregory Moine, flickr  

Sanibel Island

Sanibel Island

With a small population of locals, along with breathtaking, clear-blue waters and immaculate white-sand beaches, Sanibel Island offers a fun and relaxing vacation for families and couples alike. 960 1280

ziggymaj / E+ / Getty Images  

Palm Beach

Palm Beach

The easternmost town in all of Florida, Palm Beach is lined with its namesake majestic trees and loaded with beautiful beachfront properties, high-end hotels and sprawling resorts. 960 1280

Simon Morris via Flickr Creative Commons NC 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Palm Beach

Palm Beach

This 16-mile-long, half-mile-wide island is the epitome of wealth and extravagance. In times past, it served as the winter home to the Vanderbilts, the Kennedys, the Rockefellers and other millionaires. True to form, the town still features some of Florida’s finest hotels, restaurants and shops, as well as beautiful beaches. Perched next to the Gulf Stream, this beach town also enjoys the extra benefit of warm blue water and gentle breezes. 960 1280

Panoramic Images/ Getty Images  

Key West

Key West

The beaches in Key West are ideal for swimming and snorkeling, and fishing is allowed off the piers at most beaches. Enjoy these activities at Fort Zachary Taylor State Park, Florida’s southernmost state park -- and one of its most beautiful spots -- that’s home to wide stretches of sand and tranquil waters. We recommend renting a 2-person, glass-bottom kayak if you’re looking for a fun but romantic escape. 960 1280

Katja Kreder/ AWL Images/ Getty Images  

Key West

Key West

A beach lover’s heaven, Key West is one of the most enchanting of the 1,700 islands that make up the Florida Keys. It’s also the southernmost city in the continental US. 960 1280

Ed Schipul via Flickr Creative Commons SA 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Siesta Key

Siesta Key

Situated between Roberts Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, just a short distance from downtown Sarasota, Siesta Key is as laid-back and enjoyable as any beach you’ll find in Florida. 960 1280

Thomas Orger via Flickr Creative Commons NC ND 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Siesta Key

Siesta Key

Spend the perfect family vacation in Siesta Key, a barrier island off Florida’s central western coast that boasts beachside picnic areas and playgrounds. Go shell collecting, kayaking or hop on a catamaran for more active pursuits. For adults who want a more low-key experience, spend a candlelit dinner at a restaurant or rent a cozy cottage for a romantic getaway. 960 1280

Mike Miller, flickr  

Naples

Naples

Located in southern Florida on the Gulf of Mexico, Naples offers phenomenal fishing experiences along the pier, top-notch outdoor restaurants and fun — but difficult — golf courses. 960 1280

Marcus Andersson via Flickr Creative Commons 2.0  

Naples

Naples

Watch the rolling waves and gaze at the mansions that line some of Naples’ most popular beaches along 12th Avenue South. For a family looking to camp out on the beach for the day, we recommend heading a few miles north of Old Naples to Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park. Food stands and on-site rentals for umbrellas, kayaks and snorkeling gear are available nearby. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Captiva Island

Captiva Island

Just north of its aforementioned sister island, Sanibel, Captiva Island is a tropical paradise right here in the United States. It offers some of the best fishing and boating in Florida. 960 1280

Jeff Self via Flickr Creative Commons NC ND 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Captiva Island

Captiva Island

The blue waters and white-sand beaches of Captiva Island stretch into the horizon. So we recommend watching a spectacular sunset at the end of Captiva Drive. But before the sun sets, go boating down the waterways of the island to see local wildlife, including dolphins, crocodiles, blue herons and many different species of colorful birds. 960 1280

Pete Markham, flickr  

South Beach

South Beach

Take a dip in the crystal-blue waters of Miami’s South Beach, an international playground that offers non-stop nightlife, high-end shopping, luxurious boutique hotels and unique Art Deco architecture. This man-made beach is perfect for early morning runs and topless sunbathing. 960 1280

photosvit/ iStock/ Thinkstock  

South Beach

South Beach

Take in a beautiful sunrise accompanied by blue skies and colorful clouds as you walk along one of the world’s most renowned beaches. 960 1280

ventdusud / iStock / Getty Images Plus  

Delray Beach

Delray Beach

Each year, nearly 1 million people visit family-friendly Delray Beach to enjoy the 2-mile-long beach that’s ideal for fun beach activities, including sandcastle-building. Take a break from the beach and hit nearby Atlantic Avenue, lined with boutiques, seafood restaurants and the luxurious Seagate Hotel and Spa. 960 1280

ddmitr/ Moment Open/ Getty Images  

Delray Beach

Delray Beach

From sailing and surfing to snorkeling and paddleboarding, water-sport lovers are in for a treat when visiting Delray. 960 1280

Visit Florida / Pete Cross via Flickr Creative Commons NC ND 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Atlantic Beach

Atlantic Beach

One of the most northern spots on our list, Atlantic Beach offers sand as soft and white as sugar and beautiful azure waters reminiscent of a cloudless sky. 960 1280

Frank Vest via Flickr Creative Commons NC ND 2.0, cropped and color corrected  

Atlantic Beach

Atlantic Beach

Only a short drive from Jacksonville, Atlantic Beach exudes small-town charm, especially at the Beach Town Center, where the pedestrian-friendly cobblestone streets are lined with restaurants, galleries and boutiques. 960 1280

Fallbrook/ iStock  

dawn, lake, trees with colored leaves, mountains in distance
Adirondack Park

Adirondack Park

With seemingly bottomless lakes and a diverse mountain landscape, the Adirondack Park covers roughly 6 million acres of New York’s lush countryside. Filled with pristine camping grounds, the state-owned Adirondack Forest Preserve within the park is an ideal location to spot wildlife, from large, dangerous animals such as moose and black bears to smaller species including muskrats and foxes. 960 1280

Chris Murray / Aurora / Getty Images  

Channel Islands National Park

Channel Islands National Park

You may technically be in Southern California when you travel to Channel Islands National Park, but it sure doesn’t feel like it. Encompassing about 250,000 acres, the park consists of 5 islands, including Anacapa (pictured), and the ocean surrounding them. 960 1280
Coconino National Forest

Coconino National Forest

Covering nearly 2 million acres in northern Arizona, Coconino National Forest is divided into 3 different districts, each with its own attractions, including a group of volcanic summits known as the San Francisco Peaks; the largest natural lake in the state, Mormon Lake; the scenic Mogollon Rim; and the expansive red-rock canyons in Sedona (pictured). 960 1280

Coconino National Forest (AlbertHerring) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake in southern Oregon has azure waters that make up the deepest lake in the country. Surrounded by sheer cliffs, the fifth-oldest national park also boasts some of the United States’ cleanest air, allowing hikers to see clearly into the distance along more than 90 miles of trails. 960 1280
Devils Tower National Monument

Devils Tower National Monument

Deep within the Black Hills of Crook County, WY, lies an impressive geologic laccolith known as Devils Tower National Monument. Protruding from the ground to an astounding 1,200-plus feet above the Belle Fourche River, Devils Tower was formed by igneous rock intruding between the layers of surrounding sedimentary rocks. 960 1280
Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park

Filled with amazing natural features, from Old Faithful to the Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park is primarily in Wyoming but spreads into parts of Montana and Idaho as well. Established in 1872, America’s first national park also provides incredible picturesque landscapes, including the Lower Falls (pictured). 960 1280

By Brocken Inaglory [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons  

Hurricane Hole

Hurricane Hole

Located on St. John in the US Virgin Islands, Hurricane Hole consists of 3 separate bays — Otter Creek, Water Creek and Princess Bay — and provides pristine blue waters and once-in-a-lifetime snorkeling adventures. 960 1280

TravelingOtter via Flickr Creative Commons SA 2.0, color corrected and cropped  

Arches National Park

Arches National Park

Moab, UT, is home to some of the most glorious rock formations in the US, and the same can be said for nearby Arches National Park. With more than 2,000 natural stone arches, this red-rock wonderland also includes an unbelievable number of hiking trails, spires and monoliths unlike any others you’ll find in the world. 960 1280
Mosquito Bay

Mosquito Bay

Truly a sight to see, Mosquito Bay — located on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques — offers one of the most unusual water experiences you can have. Also known as Bioluminescent Bay, it gets its name from microscopic organisms that reside in the water and generate a phosphorus blue glow when agitated. 960 1280

Puerto Rico Tourism Company  

Mount Hood National Forest

Mount Hood National Forest

One trip to majestic Mount Hood, and it’s easy to see why so many Americans are infatuated with the Pacific Northwest. Known as the crown jewel of the Columbia River Gorge, Mount Hood, the highest point in Oregon, is also considered an active volcano, although it hasn’t erupted in about 150 years. 960 1280

deebrowning / iStock / Getty Images  

Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood National and State Parks

Home to some of the world’s oldest living organisms and the tallest trees on Earth — including Hyperion, which stands close to 380 feet — Redwood National and State Parks welcome an average of more than 400,000 visitors per year. They’re located in Humboldt County along the coast of California. 960 1280
Tonto National Forest

Tonto National Forest

Encompassing nearly 3 million acres of beautiful desert countryside, Tonto National Forest is the fifth-largest forest of its kind in the United States. It’s most impressive feature, the Salt River (pictured), measures almost 200 miles long. It’s the perfect place to go tubing, as it acts as a lazy river for locals trying to escape Arizona’s sweltering summer heat. 960 1280

Sean Foster / Moment / Getty Images  

Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park

Nestled deep within the Sierra Nevada, Yosemite National Park is one of the most visited national parks in the country, let alone California. With plenty of scenic overlooks, countless breathtaking waterfalls and stunning, ancient sequoias, Yosemite is paradise for even the most novice of outdoorsmen. 960 1280

AngMoKio (Original text: selfmade photo)) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons  

man leaning on vintage car in cuba
Cementerio de Cristobal Colon

Cementerio de Cristobal Colon

Parked at the entrance gate of Cementerio de Cristobal Colon (aka Colon Cemetery, named for Christopher Columbus) in Havana, Cuba. It’s utterly vast: With 140 acres and 800,000 graves, it’s one of the premier places in the world for eternal rest — if you can find the space. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Grave Sites at Colon Cemetery

Grave Sites at Colon Cemetery

There are a million interments at Colon Cemetery. It’s so crowded that the deceased spend only 3 years in the tomb until remains are transferred to storage to make way for the new burials. Demand is high. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

El Capitolio

El Capitolio

The beautiful and stately National Capitol Building in Havana, completed in 1929, is currently under scaffolding. The design was inspired by Paris’ Pantheon but looks awfully familiar to any American. Apartment houses next door? Ready, aim ... gentrify. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Fidel at the Bat

Fidel at the Bat

Not even Cubans believe it, but it has long been a rumor that Fidel Castro was a great baseball prospect before he became a revolutionary. To this day, his vaunted prowess on the diamond is celebrated, as in this mural inside Havana’s stadium (but it’s probably completely propaganda). The Cuban team, however, is awesome. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Home Club Dugout

Home Club Dugout

Estadio Latinoamericano. Cubans are so warm and generous, they make you feel as though you play for the home team — but I’m not sure Fidel would agree to that. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Museo de la Revolucion

Museo de la Revolucion

The glorious ceiling mural of the Museo de la Revolucion (Museum of the Revolution), which was formerly Havana’s Presidential Palace. This is where Fulgencio Batista bolted from Fidel Castro’s invading guerilla army in 1959. He left down a hidden staircase not found on building blueprints. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Flying High

Flying High

If that looks like a very big flag, it is — hanging in the courtyard of the Museo de la Revolucion (Museum of the Revolution). A reminder that 1 governance was replaced by another — and it’s going to stay that way. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Old Havana Church

Old Havana Church

One of many centuries-old churches in Old Havana, this one is near the harbor. See that empty plaza filled mainly with pigeons? Imagine what it will be like when the American cruise ships begin to dock, and you see the supreme challenge ahead for Cuba. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Havana Cathedral

Havana Cathedral

Completed in 1777, the Havana Cathedral was constructed largely of coral rock, thus giving it a specifically Caribbean feel. The pope will be paying a visit very soon. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

The Gran Teatro de la Habana

The Gran Teatro de la Habana

The Gran Teatro de la Habana (Great Theater of Havana) is home to the world-renowned Cuban National Ballet, as well as other performing groups. Opened in 1915 and currently under renovation, the building serves as a perfect backdrop for a postcard shot of classic American automobiles. 960 1280

  

The Cradle of the Daiquiri

The Cradle of the Daiquiri

La Floridita advertises itself as “La Cuna del Daiquiri” (the Cradle of the Daiquiri). Ernest Hemingway hung out here and enjoyed more than a few of the distillations. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Havana Club

Havana Club

Havana Club is the most famous of the legendary rums produced in Cuba. The brand was nationalized by the Cuban government but has since been sold to an international concern. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Havana Club Bar

Havana Club Bar

Havana Club is the most famous of the legendary rums produced in Cuba. The brand was nationalized by the Cuban government but has since been sold to an international concern. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Sloppy Joe’s

Sloppy Joe’s

Another legendary drinking hole made new again. Sloppy Joe’s was a hangout through the Roaring ’20s. This was the mojito at noon that put me in a very good mood. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Don’t Forget the Garnish

Don’t Forget the Garnish

I had the finest drinks of my life in Cuba. They really know their cocktails. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

The Harbor of Old Havana

The Harbor of Old Havana

A panorama of Havana old and new is available a short ferry ride across the harbor. Very soon, you’ll need this hillside perspective to take in the full transformation of this rediscovered city. Watch the cranes take over the skies. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Havana Street

Havana Street

Habana Vieja (Old Havana) is like any great “old city” of Spain, only it’s 90 miles off the coast of Florida. You’ll get lost and love it. 960 1280

  

Hershey Train

Hershey Train

During WWI, Milton Hershey needed a new source of sugar for his chocolate, so he came to Cuba. But to transport his product, he had to build a new train line. It still operates and is still called the Hershey Train. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Presidential Palace

Presidential Palace

A must-see at the Presidential Palace (now the Museo de la Revolucion) is the domed ceiling, one of many remains of the previous grandiose leadership. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Camilo Cienfuegos

Camilo Cienfuegos

Images of Che Guevara and Camilo Cienfuegos (pictured) adorn government buildings at the edge of the enormous Plaza de la Revolucion in Havana, where revolutionary government rallies have been held through the years. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

Paseo del Prado

Paseo del Prado

In 1772, the magnificent boulevard Paseo del Prado, reminiscent of Madrid, was laid out from the Capitol to Morro Castle. Walk along it today and see what Havana has been this last century — and speculate where it will be in 10 years. 960 1280

Don Wildman  

wide angle, waterfall, grand canyon, expansive shot, daytime,
Havasu Falls - Arizona

Havasu Falls - Arizona

Located in the Grand Canyon near the Havasupai Indian village of Supai, AZ, Havasu Falls has an average water temperature of 72 degrees Fahrenheit year-round. One of the most extraordinary swimming holes on the planet, it features spring-fed water that cascades 100 feet into an iridescent turquoise pool all day long. 960 1280

Michele Falzone / AWL Images / Getty Images  

Chena Hot Springs - Alaska

Chena Hot Springs - Alaska

Only in Alaska can you find a secret swimming hole that’s accessible only by dogsled. Known by many as nature’s hot tub, Chena is filled with water that’s a constant 106 degrees and is also good for your skin because it contains sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium. 960 1280

Patrick Endres / Design Pics / First Light / Getty Images  

Homestead Crater - Utah

Homestead Crater - Utah

Just a short drive south from Salt Lake City, UT, is Homestead Crater, a family-owned local attraction. Inside the unassuming mound of dirt is a hidden gem 12,000 years in the making. The giant pool is a soothing 96 degrees, and the water is said to have high levels of calcium and magnesium that can make you look and feel younger. 960 1280

  

Madison Blue Spring - Florida

Madison Blue Spring - Florida

Cascading over piles of limestone boulders, this first-magnitude spring on the west bank of the Withlacoochee River is one of Florida’s newest and most awe-inspiring swimming holes. Dive deep into the cool, crystal-clear waters that descend almost 25 feet into the earth’s surface, but make sure to get there early; this once-hidden gem is becoming more and more popular by the day. 960 1280

  

Blue Hole - New Mexico

Blue Hole - New Mexico

In one of the driest states in America, just off Route 66 in Santa Rosa, NM, lies the famed Blue Hole. The size of an average golf green with crystal-clear, 61-degree water, the Blue Hole is known as an artesian aquifer, where rainwater trapped beneath the ground is forced up under natural pressure. The spheres bobbing on the surface are attached to underwater diving platforms used for exploration. 960 1280

  

Cummins Falls - Tennessee

Cummins Falls - Tennessee

Looking for the best place to escape the sweltering summer heat in the heartland of America? For more than 100 years, Cummins Falls, a scenic, 75-foot waterfall located in Jackson County, TN, has been a gem for Tennessee natives … but now, the secret is out! Although it’s a bit of a hike to get to once in the park, the Blackburn Fork State Scenic River provides unmatched beauty on your way to taking a dip in Tennessee’s eighth-largest waterfall. 960 1280

  

Aztec Falls - California

Aztec Falls - California

Known for its high cliffs and deep waters, Aztec Falls is the perfect getaway for those looking to escape the hot Los Angeles sun without heading to the crowded beaches. Deep in the San Bernardino Mountains, the falls are accessed via a 6-mile loop that runs mostly along the Pacific Crest Trail and offers jumps of 20, 40 and 60 feet. 960 1280

  

Hali’i Falls - Hawaii

Hali’i Falls - Hawaii

Located deep in the jungle on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, Hali’i Falls is a multitiered waterfall that is accessible only by hiking through bamboo forests, deep marsh and former sugarcane pastures. The falls feeding this pool are named Hali’i, which means “to spread out,” and the cascading water does just that, creating the ultimate swimming experience. 960 1280

  

Mooney Falls - Arizona

Mooney Falls - Arizona

Half a mile north of Havasu Falls stands the tallest water feature in the Grand Canyon, rising 190 feet above the surface. Named after a prospector in the 1800s, Mooney Falls is accessible only by crawling through 2 tunnels and then climbing down a sheer cliff face with just a couple of dangling chains to hold on to. Although tough to get to, the view alone makes it worth the trip. 960 1280

Jeremy Woodhouse / Photodisc / Getty Images  

Wekiwa Springs - Florida

Wekiwa Springs - Florida

Deep within the sinkhole capital of the United States is the crystal-clear swimming hole known as Wekiwa Springs, just 15 miles from Orlando. One of the shallower swimming holes in Florida, it has a water depth of just 5-7 feet, but it offers a perfect 72-degree temperature year-round. 960 1280

  

Sliding Rock - North Carolina

Sliding Rock - North Carolina

A popular place to cool off during those hot North Carolina summers, Sliding Rock waterfall is located in the Pisgah National Forest in Transylvania County. About 60 feet of flattened rock dumps into a nearly 7-foot-deep pool at the bottom, making this natural waterslide a great place to visit with kids of all ages. 960 1280

  

Lihue Plantation - Hawaii

Lihue Plantation - Hawaii

A private swimming hole at the old Lihue Sugar Plantation on Kauai, HI, was transformed into an inner-tube water ride by Kauai Backcountry Adventures in 2003. The waters for this 2 1/2-mile journey, which originate near the top of Mount Waialeale — one of the wettest spots in the world — are channeled through ditches and tunnels that were hand-dug by plantation workers over a century ago. 960 1280

  

Beaver Falls - Arizona

Beaver Falls - Arizona

The third and final swimming hole in the Grand Canyon, Beaver Falls is a free-falling fantasy that offers 40-foot cliffs and deep, aqua-blue pools. 960 1280

By Gonzo fan2007 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons  

Start Planning

Highway 29
Highway 29

Highway 29

Take California State Route 29 to see some of the region’s best vineyards and wineries. Through Napa Valley, Highway 29 passes through Calistoga, St. Helena, Rutherford, Oakville, Yountville and Napa. 960 1280

Tom Bridge, Flickr  

Silverado Trail

Silverado Trail

Hit the road early to capture the serene vineyards along the Silverado Trail, a scenic route along the eastern edge of Napa Valley. Most locals suggest taking this route to avoid traffic on California State Route 29, which runs parallel to the Trail. 960 1280

seligmanwaite, Flickr  

Wine Country

Wine Country

Northern California's wine country beckons visitors with hundreds of wineries spread across 3 counties. 960 1280

  

Castello di Amorosa

Castello di Amorosa

Castello di Amorosa Winery is located near Calistoga, CA. The 121,000-square-foot medieval replica castle includes 107 rooms and 8 levels above and below ground. Among its many features, it has a moat, drawbridge, defensive towers, interior courtyard, chapel, torture chamber and a great hall. Visitors to the vineyard can sample the wines sold at the castle. 960 1280

Jim G., Flickr  

Cabernet

Cabernet

Northern California's climate is ideal for growing grapes like these ripe ones used to make a fine cabernet. 960 1280

  

Beringer Rhine House

Beringer Rhine House

Make a stop at the Beringer Rhine House -- Napa Valley’s oldest continuously operating winery. Enjoy the award-winning wines, rich history and beautifully landscaped grounds. 960 1280

Chuck O'Rear  

California Wine

California Wine

The best way to appreciate Northern California's wine country is to sample the goods along the way. 960 1280

  

Old Faithful Geyser of California

Old Faithful Geyser of California

While you’re on your road trip, we suggestion stopping by the Old Faithful Geyser of California, located in Calistoga, CA. It’s just one of many roadside attractions you’ll see along the way. 960 1280

Kunal Mukherjee, flickr  

Picturesque Vineyards

Picturesque Vineyards

Bring along a camera for photo opportunities in the acres of rolling vineyards in Napa and Sonoma. 960 1280

  

Staglin Family Vineyard

Staglin Family Vineyard

The Staglin Family Vineyard, a family-owned Napa Valley winery in Rutherford, CA, produces a variety of wines, including Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sangiovese and a Bordeaux-style blend. Take a guided tour of the winery, and then at the end of the tour, experience an intimate tasting of Cabernet Sauvignons produced on the estate. 960 1280

Kopol Bonick Studio  

Wine Production

Wine Production

These terraced vineyards in Sonoma rely on biodynamic agricultural techniques to produce local wine. 960 1280

  

Oxbow Public Market

Oxbow Public Market

Go local! Visit the Oxbow Public Market in Napa Valley to sample the local community’s best, including fresh food, wine and cheese. Take Highway 29 to the city of Napa; take the 1st Street Exit (bear right to head east); and look for signs marked ‘Oxbow Public Market’. 960 1280

Oxbow Public Market  

Merlot

Merlot

Ripe for the picking, these grapes will be used to make merlot. 960 1280

  

Sterling Vineyard

Sterling Vineyard

Several vineyards, including the Sterling Vineyard (pictured) in Calistoga, CA, are fun getaways for tourists. See picturesque views from their aerial tram. Guests can also travel the grounds by foot. And with a glass of wine in hand, stroll through art galleries and elevated walkways that allow visitors to see the winemaking process from grape to glass. 960 1280

Jim G., Flickr  

Years of Preparation

Years of Preparation

These vines in Sonoma have been used for growing grapes for nearly 90 years. 960 1280

  

Di Rosa Preserve

Di Rosa Preserve

While you’re on the road, we suggest you visit the Di Rosa Preserve, a 35-acre lake and wildlife. The area is not only rich in an array of flora, fauna and wildlife, but it’s also the canvas to display a broad range of art created by Bay Area artists. Art aficionados can walk the grounds to see art work in the Main Gallery, Gatehouse Gallery, Historic Residence, Courtyard, North Lawn and Sculpture Meadow. It’s an art lover’s paradise. 960 1280

collectmoments, Flickr  

The Grapes

The Grapes

These grapes may become a bottle of your favorite California wine, but you'll have to wait a few years to try it. 960 1280

  

Downtown Napa

Downtown Napa

If wine tasting and tours isn’t you’re thing, then make a pit stop in Downtown Napa. The area has dozens of shops, dessert cafes, bars, restaurants and spas. Hotels and B&Bs are available in the area. It’s a perfect home-base location for visitors to explore nearby vineyards and mix with the locals. 960 1280

Napa Downtown Association  

Mud Bath

Mud Bath

Unwind and relax with a mud bath at one of several spas located in Napa Valley, including Meadowood, Dr. Wilkinson’s Hot Springs, Golden Haven Hot Springs Spa, Calistoga Spa Hot Springs, Indian Springs Resort and Roman Spa Motel. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Our Lady of Guadalupe
Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe

An aerial view of the Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe, one of Puerto Vallarta's most iconic landmarks. The original crown was damaged in a 7.5-magnitude earthquake in Mexico City in 1995, but has since been replaced by new reinforced cement castings. 960 1280

istock  

Villa

Villa

The view from a luxury Puerto Vallarta villa -- complete with an infinity pool and the Pacific Ocean. 960 1280

istock  

Iguana

Iguana

A local resident. 960 1280

Jon DeJong through Flickr Creative Commons   

Danza de los Voladores de Papantla

Danza de los Voladores de Papantla

Men performing the 'Danza de los Voladores de Papantla' (the Dance of the Flyers), a pre-Hispanic ritual designed to appease the gods and prevent drought. During the ritual, men climb up a 50-foot pole, winding their ropes all the way around. When they reach the top, they jump off and spin around the pole back to the ground. 960 1280

D'Arcy Norman through Flickr Creative Commons   

Flea market

Flea market

The colorful flea market of Puerto Vallarta. 960 1280

istock   

The beach of the dead

The beach of the dead

La Playa de los Muertos (The Beach of the Dead). The section of the large Playa de los Muertos known as Blue Chairs is Puerto Vallarta's most popular gay beach. 960 1280

Arkangel through Flickr Creative Commons   

Los Arcos Amphitheater

Los Arcos Amphitheater

The 4 stone arches at Los Arcos Amphitheater, an open-air theater that features nightly performances in downtown Puerto Vallarta. Watch the sun set over Banderas Bay. Plus, sample local food from the street vendors who congregate in the area. 960 1280

istock   

Parasailing

Parasailing

Go parasailing at one of Puerto Vallarta's many beaches and get a bird's-eye view of Banderas Bay. 960 1280

istock  

Puerto Vallarta¿s oceanside boardwalk

Puerto Vallarta¿s oceanside boardwalk

Walk along the Malecon, Puerto Vallarta's oceanside boardwalk, and take a look at some of the many impressive sculptures. Pictured is Rafael Zamarripa's 'Caballero del Mar,' (the Seahorse). 960 1280

istock   

ceviche

ceviche

Sample some local ceviche with tostadas. 960 1280

istock   

Mismaloya cove

Mismaloya cove

The Mismaloya cove was the setting for the 1964 film 'Night of the Iguana,' starring Richard Burton. Puerto Vallarta became a popular tourist destination after the media extensively covered the romance between Burton and Elizabeth Taylor during filming. The pair later purchased a vacation home in Puerto Vallarta. 960 1280

istock  

Los Arcos Marine Park

Los Arcos Marine Park

Los Arcos Marine Park, located near Mismaloya in the Bay of Banderas, is one of the most popular spots for snorkeling and diving in Puerto Vallarta. 960 1280

Danny Luong through Flickr Creative Commons   

Huachinango Zarandeado

Huachinango Zarandeado

Huachinango Zarandeado, or grilled red snapper, a Puerto Vallarta specialty. 960 1280

David Gordon   

As the temperature rises in the Caribbean during the summer, airfare and hotel rates to places like St. John drop. 960 1280

  

Between May and December, Maho Bay Camps on St. John is a bargain for families. 960 1280

  

The beauty of a Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, vacation: a week at a budget-friendly hotel for under $1,000. 960 1280

  

Family deals at the Myrtle Beach Sea Mist include admission to the resort's own water park. 960 1280

  

In the afternoon at Medomak Camp in Rockland, Maine, everyone heads to the lake. 960 1280

  

Swimming, sculling, sailing and, of course, kayaking are among the most popular activities at Medomak Camp. 960 1280

  

The Ace Adventure Center in Oak Hill, West Virginia boasts a prime location on the New River Gorge National River. 960 1280

  

At the Ace, you can carve some family-bonding time into the summer with wild outdoor adventures for one set price. 960 1280

  

Shake up your summer routine with an urban getaway to Boston. 960 1280

  

With no slush and snow underfoot, it's a great time for a stroll along Boston's Freedom Trail. 960 1280

  

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