Cinque Terre, coastline, Italy
Cinque Terre

Cinque Terre

Visitors flock to Cinque Terre on the Italian Riviera for great hiking, pretty beaches and romantic cliffside villages.
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Poike/iStock/Getty Images  

Amalfi Coast

Amalfi Coast

Positano on the Amalfi Coast has been a welcome beach retreat since the days of Roman nobility and the ancient Greeks.
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Karl Blackwell/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Capri

Capri

Located off the Sorrento peninsula, Capri is a rocky, mountainous island beloved by starlets and jet-setters.
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David Soanes Photography/Moment Open/Getty Images  

Sardinia

Sardinia

Sunbathers and fancy yachts compete with the beach's natural beauty along Sardinia's Costa Smeralda, or Emerald Coast.
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iStockphoto.com/Matteo_Parma  

Tuscany

Tuscany

Tuscany is known for its rolling hills, great wine and superb scuba diving in Monte Argentario's coves and bays. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Romaoslo  

Sicily

Sicily

Sicily's many beaches include sandy white shores and exotic black sands, making for a unique island getaway.
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Federico Scotto/Moment/Getty Images  

Lido

Lido

The best beaches in Venice are found on Lido, a 7-mile long sandbar sitting in the Venice Lagoon and Adriatic Sea.
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Holger Leue/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Puglia

Puglia

Most tourists don't make it all the way down the spur and heel of this boot-shaped country, but they're missing out. Southern Italy's Puglia region has not only over 400 miles of stunning coastline, but seafood specialities that alone are worth a trip.  960 1280

Peter Adams/AWL Images/Getty Images  

The Tremiti Islands

The Tremiti Islands

The Tremiti Islands, often called the pearls of the Adriatic Sea, are a string of islands including San Domino, San Nicola and Caprara. San Domino is the largest and most developed of the 3 and is known as the "green pearl" with its lush vegetation. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Simone  

Viareggio

Viareggio

Tuscany's largest beach town, Viareggio is one of the farthest points south on the Italian Riviera. Viareggio is a classic resort town with art nouveau buildings, bustling nightlife and endless food, but it's best known for its wild Carnival festival, a tradition since 1873. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Wjarek  

Koala Bears, tree, Australia
Rabbits on Okunoshima, Japan

Rabbits on Okunoshima, Japan

During World War II, Japan used the island of Okunoshima for producing chemical weapons. Now, it’s a much happier place that’s better known as Rabbit Island, because it is home to hundreds of wild bunnies. The adorable inhabitants of this popular tourist destination hop up to visitors in search of scratches and snacks. 960 1280

Chris McGrath/Getty Images   

Pigs on Big Major Key, Bahamas

Pigs on Big Major Key, Bahamas

Bet you never thought of swimming with pigs as an adventure on your next vacation in the Bahamas. But that’s just what visitors can do on Big Major Key, aka Pig Beach, in the Exuma archipelago. There are several theories on how the growing colony of 20 or so pigs landed on the island, but with 1 snort from those adorable sandy snouts, you won’t even care. 960 1280

The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism   

Lemurs in Madagascar

Lemurs in Madagascar

There are about 100 species and subspecies of these primates, and all of them are native only to the African island of Madagascar, one of the most biodiverse destinations in the world. Some are as small as a mouse; others can be the size of a big house cat. Conservation efforts have continued to grow, as many of the lemur populations are in danger of extinction. 960 1280

Cyril Ruoso/Minden Pictures/Getty Images   

6-Toed Cats in Key West

6-Toed Cats in Key West

The official term is polydactyl, meaning "many digits," but they’re also called Hemingway cats. That’s because a ship captain gave Ernest Hemingway a cat with this genetic abnormality. The author was fascinated and began collecting and breeding others. Forty or 50 cats — about half of them polydactyl — still live at the Hemingway Home in Key West, and the small island has a higher-than-normal percentage of 6-toed felines. 960 1280

Georges DeKeerle/Hulton Archive/Getty Images   

Red Crabs on Christmas Island

Red Crabs on Christmas Island

Tens of millions of red crabs live on the 52 square miles of Christmas Island, an Australian territory in the Indian Ocean. Every year at the beginning of the rainy season, usually in November or December, they migrate from the forests to the coast to breed, creating a bright red parade that shuts down roads on the island. 960 1280

Stephen Belcher/Minden Pictures/Getty Images   

Giant Pandas in China

Giant Pandas in China

A symbol of the country, these critically endangered bears are now found only in a small section of mountain forests in central China; by last count, there were fewer than 2,000 left in the wild. Beyond that, almost all of the pandas in captivity elsewhere in the world still technically belong to China and are being "leased" to other countries. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Oktay Ortakcioglu  

Giant Tortoises on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

Giant Tortoises on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

The islands made famous by Charles Darwin’s study of evolution have a number of unique animal species, but the 1 that most often comes to mind is the giant tortoise. In fact, its official name is the Galapagos tortoise. These vertebrates live to be an average of at least 100 years old in the wild and can grow to be more than 600 pounds. 960 1280

  

Wild Ponies on Assateague Island, MD/VA

Wild Ponies on Assateague Island, MD/VA

More than 300 wild horses live on the Assateague Island National Seashore, half in Virginia and half in Maryland. Visitors who take a boat ride along the inland waterway can often see groups of the animals grazing among the grasses of the salt marsh. Every July, thousands of spectators gather on neighboring Chincoteague Island to watch the traditional Pony Swim. 960 1280

National Park Service   

Cape Fur Seals on Seal Island, South Africa

Cape Fur Seals on Seal Island, South Africa

There are 60,000 seals living (and lounging) on this island in False Bay. Oddly enough, the destination may be just as famous for the great white sharks that patrol the surrounding waters and feed on the island’s namesake inhabitants. Visitors can catch one of many boats from the mainland in hopes of witnessing the unbelievable sight of a predator jumping out of the water to devour its prey. 960 1280

David Jenkins/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images  

Corgis in England

Corgis in England

Even though these short-legged dogs are a Welsh breed, they’re most often associated with England, thanks to Queen Elizabeth II, who has owned more than 30 of them. London even used one in an adorable promotional campaign. The queen declared in 2015 that she wouldn’t be getting any more new corgis, but luckily, you can see them outside the United Kingdom, too! 960 1280

Carl Court/Getty Images   

Koalas in Australia

Koalas in Australia

Sure, Australia has a number of endemic species, including kangaroos and emus. But no trip Down Under is complete without getting your photo taken with a fuzzy little koala. Because of habitat destruction, these marsupials (they’re not bears!) are now found in the wild only in eastern Australia. 960 1280

Adam Bruzzone/Tourism Australia  

Mountain Gorillas in Rwanda

Mountain Gorillas in Rwanda

The estimated 800 remaining mountain gorillas actually live in 3 countries in central Africa, but the population in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park is the most famous, thanks to Dian Fossey, who studied it for nearly 20 years and wrote about her experiences in Gorillas in the Mist. Even Breaking Borders hosts Michael Voltaggio and Mariana van Zeller stopped for a glimpse of these giant primates, which live in groups led by a dominant male called a silverback. 960 1280

Panoramic Images/Getty Images   

Bengal tigers in India

Bengal tigers in India

Bengal tigers are the most common kind of tiger — relatively speaking, of course, considering that all 6 of the remaining tiger subspecies are endangered. The biggest population lives in India, whose Ranthambore National Park is known as the best place to still see these majestic cats in the wild. 960 1280

Danita Delimont/Gallo Images/Getty Images   

Penguins in Antarctica

Penguins in Antarctica

Penguins crowded on a barren, white expanse of snow and ice — that’s what many people imagine Antarctica to look like. About a third of penguin species live and/or breed on the southernmost continent, including the largest, emperor penguins. The flightless birds’ waterproof coats, fatty insulation and amazing swimming skills come in handy in this harsh environment. 960 1280

Paul Souders/Photolibrary/Getty Images   

Komodo Dragons in Indonesia

Komodo Dragons in Indonesia

They may not be as cute as koalas or lemurs, but Komodo dragons, which are found only on a few Indonesian islands, are just as fascinating. Weighing as much as 300 pounds or more, they are the largest living lizards. Their size, combined with an acute sense of smell, powerful claws, serrated teeth and a venomous bite, makes them ferocious predators.  960 1280

Danita Delimont/Gallo Images/Getty Images   

Virginia, Monticello
Delaware, Caesar Rodney Statue

Delaware, Caesar Rodney Statue

This statue of Delaware’s most cherished patriot stands in downtown Wilmington, DE. On July 1, 1776, Caesar Rodney rode horseback to Philadelphia -- the very next day, the American lawyer and politician from Dover, DE, cast a crucial vote that paved the way for the passage of the Declaration of Independence. 960 1280

Joe del Tufo/Delaware Tourism Office  

Pennsylvania, Liberty Bell

Pennsylvania, Liberty Bell

This iconic symbol of American independence carries the words, “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.” Historians believe the copper bell was one of many bells rung to mark the public reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776. 960 1280

Robert & Pam, flickr  

New Jersey, Atlantic City

New Jersey, Atlantic City

The Atlantic City Boardwalk was the first boardwalk in America. It opened in June 1870 to help hotel owners keep sand out of their lobbies. Today, the boardwalk lures many visitors on the way to one of the area's many casinos … and to a confectioner's stand for the boardwalk’s famous salt water taffy.  960 1280

Walter Bibikow / The Images Bank / Getty Images  

Georgia, Ebenezer Baptist Church

Georgia, Ebenezer Baptist Church

A great leader was born here. Before he ever became America’s leading civil rights leader, Martin Luther King’s moral conscience was shaped at Ebenezer Baptist Church. 960 1280

Judy Baxter, flickr  

Connecticut, Mystic Seaport

Connecticut, Mystic Seaport

The Mystic Seaport was one of the first living history museums in America, having opened in 1929. Spanning nearly 20 acres, the museum showcases a recreated 19th-century coastal village with more than 60 historic buildings, as well as a collection of historic ships -- including 4 that are National Historic Landmarks. 960 1280

Connecticut Office of Tourism  

Massachusetts, Plymouth Rock

Massachusetts, Plymouth Rock

Legend has it that the Pilgrims first landed upon a boulder -- it came to be known as Plymouth Rock. That enduring symbol of America’s early history now sits under this granite canopy, built in 1921, at Pilgrim Memorial State Park.  960 1280

Kenneth C. Zirkel / Photodisc / Getty Images  

Maryland, Fort McHenry

Maryland, Fort McHenry

The star-shaped Fort McHenry was built to defend the port of Baltimore against enemy attack. That moment came in September 1814 when the British continuously bombarded the fort for 25 hours. American forces successfully defended Baltimore Harbor -- a move that inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner.” 960 1280

Thinkstock  

South Carolina, Fort Sumter

South Carolina, Fort Sumter

In the early morning hours of April 12, 1861, Confederate forces opened fire on Fort Sumter. They fired continuously for the next 34 hours, setting off the Civil War. It would take nearly 4 years for Union forces to regain control of the fort. 960 1280

Harry Alverson, flickr   

New Hampshire, Mt. Washington Cog Railway

New Hampshire, Mt. Washington Cog Railway

In 1857, a man named Sylvester Marsh was climbing New Hampshire’s Mt. Washington when he got the idea to build a railway up the mountain. He put up $5,000 of his own money to fund what would become the world’s first mountain-climbing cog railway. Today, the Mt. Washington Cog Railway is the second steepest rack railway in the world, behind Mt. Pilatus Railway in Switzerland. 960 1280

NH Division of Parks and Recreation  

Virginia, Monticello

Virginia, Monticello

Monticello stands as an enduring symbol of America’s third president and his genius. Thomas Jefferson designed his Monticello estate in Charlottesville, VA, to embrace both old and new thinking: classical features such as pedimented porticos, mix with sophisticated interior spatial organization and low elevation, borrowed from 18th-century Parisian townhouse designs. 960 1280

Tony Fischer, flickr  

New York, Statue of Liberty

New York, Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty was the first landmark that many immigrants to the United States saw as they approached New York Harbor. A gift from the people of France, the iconic figure represents the Roman goddess of freedom. In one hand she bears a torch, in the other a tablet upon which is inscribed the date of the Declaration of Independence. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

North Carolina, Wright Brothers Memorial

North Carolina, Wright Brothers Memorial

Steady winds lured Ohio brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright to Kill Devil Hills, NC, between 1900 and 1903. Their vision was to fly a heavier-than-air machine. The Wright Brothers National Memorial marks that successful effort -- attained on Dec. 17, 1903, following 3 years of trial and error. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Rhode Island, Breakers Mansion

Rhode Island, Breakers Mansion

When American millionaire Cornelius Vanderbilt was looking to build a summer home, he got his wish with The Breakers. Built in 1893, the 70-room mansion in Newport, RI, sits on 13 acres of land overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. It came with a cool price tag: $12 million (today, the equivalent of $335 million). 960 1280

Wally Gobetz  

Vermont, Camel’s Hump

Vermont, Camel’s Hump

The distinctive silhouette of Camel’s Hump stands in the background of this rural scene. The third-highest mountain (and highest undeveloped peak) in Vermont, Camel’s Hump is part of the Green Mountain range. It’s also featured on the state quarter.   960 1280

jdwfoto / iStock / Getty Images  

Kentucky, Kentucky Derby

Kentucky, Kentucky Derby

Every first Saturday in May, Louisville, KY, is home to the “Most Exciting Two Minutes In Sports.” The Kentucky Derby marks the annual stakes race for 3-year-old thoroughbreds, which race around a 1 1/4-mile track. The tradition began in May 1875, when the first Derby was held before a crowd of 10,000 people. 960 1280

kentuckytourism.com  

Tennessee, Ryman Auditorium

Tennessee, Ryman Auditorium

The Grand Ole Opry was born here. First opened as a church, Ryman Auditorium was later used to broadcast the famed country music stage concert series from 1943 to 1974. In subsequent years, Ryman fell into disrepair, until performances by country singer Emmylou Harris here sparked renewed interest in the space. Today, the 2,362-seat live performance venue hosts a variety of music performances. 960 1280

Tennessee Dept. of Tourist Development  

Ohio, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

Ohio, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

The quiet shores of Ohio’s Lake Erie are home to rock ‘n’ roll’s biggest celebration: the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. Located in Cleveland, the museum preserves the work of rock’s most influential artists and producers through exhibits that span 5 floors -- the museum’s third floor showcases the Hall of Fame and includes a wall with all the inductees’ signatures. 960 1280

Ohio Office of Tourism  

Louisiana, Oak Alley Plantation

Louisiana, Oak Alley Plantation

By the banks of the Mississippi River stands Oak Alley Plantation -- so named because of the double row of 300-year-old oak trees that sit alongside each side of the path leading to the mansion. Designed in the spirit of French Creole architecture, the plantation home was built between 1837 and 1839 for a wealthy sugar planter of the day. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Indiana, Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Indiana, Indianapolis Motor Speedway

In 1905, Indianapolis businessman Carl Fisher envisioned building a speedway to test cars before they went to market. Four years later, ground was broken -- and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was born. Since that time, the speedway has been the site of 248 automobile races -- and sees crowds of more than 400, 000 people in what is the world’s highest-capacity stadium facility. 960 1280

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Photography  

Mississippi, Blues Trail

Mississippi, Blues Trail

There’s just something about Mississippi -- more blues singers have come from state than all the other Southern states combined. The Mississippi Blues Trail, which extends from the border of Louisiana into southern Mississippi (and beyond, into Memphis, TN, and Chicago) honors many blues legends, such as B.B. King. Follow the trail to Tupelo, MS -- the birthplace of Elvis Presley. 960 1280

Joseph, flickr  

Illinois, Willis Tower

Illinois, Willis Tower

When the 108-story Willis Tower was completed in 1973 it became the world’s tallest building -- a distinction it held for 25 years. Today, the skyscraper still stands as the tallest building in America. More than 1 million people visit its observation deck each year, taking in views of the Chicago skyline. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Alabama, The Selma Bridge

Alabama, The Selma Bridge

Visitors walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, AL. Built in 1940 -- and named after a former Confederate brigadier general -- the arch bridge later became the site of Bloody Sunday, the day in March 1965 when 600 civil rights marchers were attacked by police with billy clubs and tear gas.  960 1280

Stephen Saks / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images  

Maine, Portland Head Light

Maine, Portland Head Light

In 1787, George Washington ordered the construction of this lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, ME. Two people had died that same year in a shipwreck, a tragedy heightened by the lack of lighthouses on Maine’s rocky coast. Today, the lighthouse remains a towering beacon, standing 80 feet above ground.  960 1280

EJ Johnson Photography / iStock / Thinkstock  

Missouri, Gateway Arch

Missouri, Gateway Arch

The Gateway Arch celebrates America’s westward expansion. At 630 feet (taller than the Washington Monument), it is the tallest man-made monument in the United States. The monument opened to the public in 1967. An accompanying underground visitor center opened in 1976. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Arkansas, Buffalo National River

Arkansas, Buffalo National River

Flowing nonstop for 135 miles, Arkansas’s Buffalo National River is one of the last undammed rivers in the lower 48 states. It was named the first National River, under the oversight of the National Park Service, in 1972. The river is popular for fishing, canoeing and camping; it’s also a great place to take a summertime plunge. 960 1280

Wesley Hitt / Getty Images  

Michigan, The Henry Ford Museum

Michigan, The Henry Ford Museum

Discover America’s entrepreneurial spirit at The Henry Ford, a large indoor-outdoor history museum complex in metro Detroit. Opened in 1929 -- on the 50th anniversary of the lightbulb’s invention -- the museum’s exhibits span historic artifacts (such as Thomas Edison’s laboratory) to classic Americana like these famous double arches. 960 1280

Collections of The Henry Ford  

Florida, Kennedy Space Center

Florida, Kennedy Space Center

Midway between Miami and Jacksonville, FL, dreams of outer space take flight. The Kennedy Space Center has been the launch site of every US human space flight since 1968. At the KSC Visitors Complex discover the thrill of takeoff with a Shuttle Launch Experience, a motion control ride that simulates a shuttle launch. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Texas, The Alamo

Texas, The Alamo

The Alamo is the most enduring symbol of Texas independence. In 1836, Mexican forces waged a 13-day battle on the grounds of a former church. In the end, Mexican forces killed 190 men, including frontiersman Davy Crockett. Soon the battle cry “Remember the Alamo” led Texas forces to victory at the battle of San Jacinto -- a move that secured Texas’s independence.  960 1280

DC Productions / Photodisc / Thinkstock  

Iowa, High Trestle Trail Bridge

Iowa, High Trestle Trail Bridge

Take in the awe-inspiring view of the Des Moines River Valley from the High Trestle Trail Bridge. The bridge is located in central Iowa near the town of Madrid, and is the centerpiece of a 25-mile trail that runs from the cities of Ankeny to Woodward. At 2,300 feet long and 13 stories tall, it is the fifth largest trail bridge in the world. 960 1280

Iowa Tourism Office  

Wisconsin, Taliesin

Wisconsin, Taliesin

Taliesin, located near Spring Green, WI, was the summer home of the renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. It was where he designed the architecture of Fallingwater and the Guggenheim, among others. 960 1280

Toy Dog Design, flickr  

California, Golden Gate Bridge

California, Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge has been called the most “beautiful bridge in the country, if not the world.” So just why isn’t the bridge golden? The term “Golden Gate” actually refers to the Golden Gate Strait, which is the entry point to the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. As for the bridge’s color -- it’s International Orange, a color that’s often used in the aerospace industry to distinguish objects from their surroundings … in the bridge’s case, visibility on foggy days. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Minnesota, Headwaters of the Mississippi River at Lake Itacsa

Minnesota, Headwaters of the Mississippi River at Lake Itacsa

At Lake Itasca in Minnesota, the Mississippi River begins its flow toward Louisiana. The Mississippi’s headwaters are surrounded by the picturesque woods of the Itasca State Park. 960 1280

Explore Minnesota Tourism  

Oregon, Crater Lake

Oregon, Crater Lake

Distinguished by its clarity and deep blue color, Crater Lake in southern Oregon has a violent past. A caldera lake, it was formed when the volcano Mount Mazama collapsed.  960 1280

Shippee / iStock / Thinkstock  

Kansas, Dodge City

Kansas, Dodge City

“Get out of Dodge” -- that popular phrase owes its origins to the wild frontier town of Dodge City, KS. The town’s roots stretch back to 1871, when a rancher built a sod house in the area to oversee his cattle operations. Soon the town grew – and so did the violence. Wyatt Earp, one of the toughest and deadliest gunmen of his day, became marshal of the town in 1876 -- with gun-slinging exploits that earned the town national attention.  960 1280

Jupiter Images / Photos.com / Thinkstock  

West Virginia's 150th

West Virginia's 150th

The Mountain State marks its 150th anniversary in 2013. In June 1863, at the height of the Civil War, an expanse of land in the Appalachian Mountain range broke away from the state of Virginia, becoming the only state to form by seceding from the Confederacy. Among West Virginia’s must-see sites is the New River Gorge, a 3,030-foot-long steel arch bridge near Fayetteville, WV. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Nevada, Las Vegas Strip

Nevada, Las Vegas Strip

The Strip -- a lot of action happens along this 4.2-mile stretch of Vegas. The Strip runs from Sahara Avenue to Russell Road, with famous resorts and casinos, plus 15 of the world’s 25 largest hotels, in between. 960 1280

TravelNevada, flickr  

Nebraska, Chimney Rock

Nebraska, Chimney Rock

“Pack your wagon” and discover one of the wonders of the West. At 4,226 above sea level, Chimney Rock in western Nebraska is visible for miles -- which is why it was the perfect landmark for pioneering travelers on the Oregon Trail. In fact, it was the landmark mentioned most frequently in journal entries by travelers of the day. 960 1280

Steve Cornelius, flickr  

Colorado, Colorado National Monument

Colorado, Colorado National Monument

Millions of years of erosion went into making the vibrant, orange, slick walls and canyons of Colorado National Monument.  Spanning 20,500 acres, the monument is composed of deep canyons that cut into sandstone and granite in the desert on the Colorado Plateau. Red-tailed hawks, golden eagles and coyotes live among the juniper forests on the plateau. 960 1280

Mtcurado / iStock / Thinkstock  

North Dakota, Painted Canyon

North Dakota, Painted Canyon

In September 1883 future US president Theodore Roosevelt visited the North Dakota Badlands to hunt bison. He soon fell in love with the “perfect freedom” of the West. Discover this world of flat desert mixed with petrified wood and rock formations at the Theodore Roosevelt National Park -- its Painted Canyon Overlook offers visitors unparalleled vistas in a myriad colors. 960 1280

North Dakota Tourism  

South Dakota, Mount Rushmore

South Dakota, Mount Rushmore

In 1923 South Dakota historian Doane Robinson envisioned carving the likenesses of US presidents into South Dakota’s Black Hills region. It took 14 years and 400 workers to complete Mount Rushmore, with the likenesses of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln intricately carved into the granite. Today, Mount Rushmore is South Dakota’s top tourist draw. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Montana, Wild Goose Island in St. Mary Lake, Glacier National Park

Montana, Wild Goose Island in St. Mary Lake, Glacier National Park

St. Mary Lake in Glacier National Park features a small island in its center called Wild Goose Island. Folklore surrounds its name -- the story goes that 2 young lovers met on the island where they were turned into geese … and so given the chance to stay together forever and flee their disapproving tribes.  960 1280

CoyStClair / iStock / Thinkstock  

Washington, Space Needle

Washington, Space Needle

Seattle’s Space Needle was built for the 1962 World’s Fair. It features an observation deck at 520 feet and a rotating restaurant (at 500 feet) that offers diners 360-degree views of the city. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Idaho, Middle Fork of the Salmon River

Idaho, Middle Fork of the Salmon River

Middle Fork of the Salmon River spans 110 miles, and includes 300 ratable rapids and 6 natural hot springs, making it a popular whitewater rafting destination. 960 1280

ROW Adventures  

Wyoming, Old Faithful

Wyoming, Old Faithful

Two-thirds of the world’s geysers are located at Yellowstone National Park -- among the park’s 300 geysers, Old Faithful is its most famous. In 1870, Old Faithful became the first geyser in Yellowstone to be named, earning its name due to its predictable eruptions every 91 minutes.  960 1280

Adam Long Sculpture / iStock / Thinkstock  

Utah, Salt Lake Temple

Utah, Salt Lake Temple

The largest Mormon temple, Salt Lake Temple took 40 years to complete. The cornerstone was laid by Brigham Young, the second president of the Mormon Church and founder of Salt Lake City. 960 1280

Thinkstock   

Oklahoma, Oklahoma City National Memorial

Oklahoma, Oklahoma City National Memorial

 The Oklahoma City National Memorial honors all who were affected by the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. The memorial includes a reflecting pool, field of empty chairs, survivors’ wall and survivor tree. The eastern gate, seen here, represents the last minute of peace before the bombing. 960 1280

Danita Delimont / Gallo Images / Getty Images  

New Mexico, Chaco Culture National Historical Park

New Mexico, Chaco Culture National Historical Park

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico contains the most expansive collection of ancient pueblos and ruins north of Mexico. 960 1280

Alberto Loyo / iStock / Thinkstock  

Arizona, Havasupai Falls

Arizona, Havasupai Falls

In the midst of the Arizona heat, Havasupai Falls offers a relaxing swimming hole -- making it the perfect place to cool off in the Grand Canyon. 960 1280

Thinkstock   

Alaska, Mt. McKinley

Alaska, Mt. McKinley

The highest mountain peak in the United States, Mount McKinley in Alaska is regularly climbed with 58% of climbers reaching the top. 960 1280

Thinkstock   

Hawaii, USS Arizona Memorial

Hawaii, USS Arizona Memorial

Situated on Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, the USS Arizona Memorial straddles the sunken hull of the battleship, marking the final resting place of 1,102 soldiers who were killed on that fateful attack that led to the United States’ involvement in World War II.   960 1280

Slobo / E+ / Getty Images  

San Francisco, city, Golden Gate Bridge, California
10. San Francisco

10. San Francisco

The 'City by the Bay' is a paradise for outdoorsy types looking for love. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Hanusst  

9. Sydney

9. Sydney

Start a search for a mate with a stroll along Sydney's Darling Harbour. 960 1280

iStockpoto.com/Klaus Hollitzer  

8. Buenos Aires, Argentina

8. Buenos Aires, Argentina

This fancy footbridge in Buenos Aries is the Puente de la Mujer, also known as the Woman's Bridge. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Alex Barcelos  

7. Miami

7. Miami

Singles in Miami can mingle with the beautiful people on the beach by day and the clubs by night. 960 1280

iStockphoto. Cities selected by askmen.com  

6. Cape Town, South Africa

6. Cape Town, South Africa

The scene is set for romance in Cape Town with the picturesque waterfront and the Table Mountains rising above the city. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Grahambedingfield  

5. London

5. London

Ladies swoon for men with accents; if you don't have one, just act the part of the suave suitor in stylish London. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/sborisov  

4. Madrid

4. Madrid

You'll have many opportunities to meet your match in Madrid; things never slow down in this energetic city. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Kasto80  

3. Tokyo

3. Tokyo

Tapping into Tokyo's singles scene may seem overwhelming until you find your niche at a sushi bar or karaoke spot. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Phattana  

2. Melbourne, Australia

2. Melbourne, Australia

Singles can search for love in artsy Melbourne with great museums, cool neighborhoods and funky nightlife.
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iStockphoto.com/Iliffd  

1. New York

1. New York

New York is the land of opportunity for singles with endless options for romance or just a fun night out on the town. 960 1280

iStockphoto.com/Chris Pritchard   

Start Planning

Highway 29
Highway 29

Highway 29

Take California State Route 29 to see some of the region’s best vineyards and wineries. Through Napa Valley, Highway 29 passes through Calistoga, St. Helena, Rutherford, Oakville, Yountville and Napa. 960 1280

Tom Bridge, Flickr  

Silverado Trail

Silverado Trail

Hit the road early to capture the serene vineyards along the Silverado Trail, a scenic route along the eastern edge of Napa Valley. Most locals suggest taking this route to avoid traffic on California State Route 29, which runs parallel to the Trail. 960 1280

seligmanwaite, Flickr  

Wine Country

Wine Country

Northern California's wine country beckons visitors with hundreds of wineries spread across 3 counties. 960 1280

  

Castello di Amorosa

Castello di Amorosa

Castello di Amorosa Winery is located near Calistoga, CA. The 121,000-square-foot medieval replica castle includes 107 rooms and 8 levels above and below ground. Among its many features, it has a moat, drawbridge, defensive towers, interior courtyard, chapel, torture chamber and a great hall. Visitors to the vineyard can sample the wines sold at the castle. 960 1280

Jim G., Flickr  

Cabernet

Cabernet

Northern California's climate is ideal for growing grapes like these ripe ones used to make a fine cabernet. 960 1280

  

Beringer Rhine House

Beringer Rhine House

Make a stop at the Beringer Rhine House -- Napa Valley’s oldest continuously operating winery. Enjoy the award-winning wines, rich history and beautifully landscaped grounds. 960 1280

Chuck O'Rear  

California Wine

California Wine

The best way to appreciate Northern California's wine country is to sample the goods along the way. 960 1280

  

Old Faithful Geyser of California

Old Faithful Geyser of California

While you’re on your road trip, we suggestion stopping by the Old Faithful Geyser of California, located in Calistoga, CA. It’s just one of many roadside attractions you’ll see along the way. 960 1280

Kunal Mukherjee, flickr  

Picturesque Vineyards

Picturesque Vineyards

Bring along a camera for photo opportunities in the acres of rolling vineyards in Napa and Sonoma. 960 1280

  

Staglin Family Vineyard

Staglin Family Vineyard

The Staglin Family Vineyard, a family-owned Napa Valley winery in Rutherford, CA, produces a variety of wines, including Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sangiovese and a Bordeaux-style blend. Take a guided tour of the winery, and then at the end of the tour, experience an intimate tasting of Cabernet Sauvignons produced on the estate. 960 1280

Kopol Bonick Studio  

Wine Production

Wine Production

These terraced vineyards in Sonoma rely on biodynamic agricultural techniques to produce local wine. 960 1280

  

Oxbow Public Market

Oxbow Public Market

Go local! Visit the Oxbow Public Market in Napa Valley to sample the local community’s best, including fresh food, wine and cheese. Take Highway 29 to the city of Napa; take the 1st Street Exit (bear right to head east); and look for signs marked ‘Oxbow Public Market’. 960 1280

Oxbow Public Market  

Merlot

Merlot

Ripe for the picking, these grapes will be used to make merlot. 960 1280

  

Sterling Vineyard

Sterling Vineyard

Several vineyards, including the Sterling Vineyard (pictured) in Calistoga, CA, are fun getaways for tourists. See picturesque views from their aerial tram. Guests can also travel the grounds by foot. And with a glass of wine in hand, stroll through art galleries and elevated walkways that allow visitors to see the winemaking process from grape to glass. 960 1280

Jim G., Flickr  

Years of Preparation

Years of Preparation

These vines in Sonoma have been used for growing grapes for nearly 90 years. 960 1280

  

Di Rosa Preserve

Di Rosa Preserve

While you’re on the road, we suggest you visit the Di Rosa Preserve, a 35-acre lake and wildlife. The area is not only rich in an array of flora, fauna and wildlife, but it’s also the canvas to display a broad range of art created by Bay Area artists. Art aficionados can walk the grounds to see art work in the Main Gallery, Gatehouse Gallery, Historic Residence, Courtyard, North Lawn and Sculpture Meadow. It’s an art lover’s paradise. 960 1280

collectmoments, Flickr  

The Grapes

The Grapes

These grapes may become a bottle of your favorite California wine, but you'll have to wait a few years to try it. 960 1280

  

Downtown Napa

Downtown Napa

If wine tasting and tours isn’t you’re thing, then make a pit stop in Downtown Napa. The area has dozens of shops, dessert cafes, bars, restaurants and spas. Hotels and B&Bs are available in the area. It’s a perfect home-base location for visitors to explore nearby vineyards and mix with the locals. 960 1280

Napa Downtown Association  

Mud Bath

Mud Bath

Unwind and relax with a mud bath at one of several spas located in Napa Valley, including Meadowood, Dr. Wilkinson’s Hot Springs, Golden Haven Hot Springs Spa, Calistoga Spa Hot Springs, Indian Springs Resort and Roman Spa Motel. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Our Lady of Guadalupe
Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe

An aerial view of the Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe, one of Puerto Vallarta's most iconic landmarks. The original crown was damaged in a 7.5-magnitude earthquake in Mexico City in 1995, but has since been replaced by new reinforced cement castings. 960 1280

istock  

Villa

Villa

The view from a luxury Puerto Vallarta villa -- complete with an infinity pool and the Pacific Ocean. 960 1280

istock  

Iguana

Iguana

A local resident. 960 1280

Jon DeJong through Flickr Creative Commons   

Danza de los Voladores de Papantla

Danza de los Voladores de Papantla

Men performing the 'Danza de los Voladores de Papantla' (the Dance of the Flyers), a pre-Hispanic ritual designed to appease the gods and prevent drought. During the ritual, men climb up a 50-foot pole, winding their ropes all the way around. When they reach the top, they jump off and spin around the pole back to the ground. 960 1280

D'Arcy Norman through Flickr Creative Commons   

Flea market

Flea market

The colorful flea market of Puerto Vallarta. 960 1280

istock   

The beach of the dead

The beach of the dead

La Playa de los Muertos (The Beach of the Dead). The section of the large Playa de los Muertos known as Blue Chairs is Puerto Vallarta's most popular gay beach. 960 1280

Arkangel through Flickr Creative Commons   

Los Arcos Amphitheater

Los Arcos Amphitheater

The 4 stone arches at Los Arcos Amphitheater, an open-air theater that features nightly performances in downtown Puerto Vallarta. Watch the sun set over Banderas Bay. Plus, sample local food from the street vendors who congregate in the area. 960 1280

istock   

Parasailing

Parasailing

Go parasailing at one of Puerto Vallarta's many beaches and get a bird's-eye view of Banderas Bay. 960 1280

istock  

Puerto Vallarta¿s oceanside boardwalk

Puerto Vallarta¿s oceanside boardwalk

Walk along the Malecon, Puerto Vallarta's oceanside boardwalk, and take a look at some of the many impressive sculptures. Pictured is Rafael Zamarripa's 'Caballero del Mar,' (the Seahorse). 960 1280

istock   

ceviche

ceviche

Sample some local ceviche with tostadas. 960 1280

istock   

Mismaloya cove

Mismaloya cove

The Mismaloya cove was the setting for the 1964 film 'Night of the Iguana,' starring Richard Burton. Puerto Vallarta became a popular tourist destination after the media extensively covered the romance between Burton and Elizabeth Taylor during filming. The pair later purchased a vacation home in Puerto Vallarta. 960 1280

istock  

Los Arcos Marine Park

Los Arcos Marine Park

Los Arcos Marine Park, located near Mismaloya in the Bay of Banderas, is one of the most popular spots for snorkeling and diving in Puerto Vallarta. 960 1280

Danny Luong through Flickr Creative Commons   

Huachinango Zarandeado

Huachinango Zarandeado

Huachinango Zarandeado, or grilled red snapper, a Puerto Vallarta specialty. 960 1280

David Gordon   

As the temperature rises in the Caribbean during the summer, airfare and hotel rates to places like St. John drop. 960 1280

  

Between May and December, Maho Bay Camps on St. John is a bargain for families. 960 1280

  

The beauty of a Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, vacation: a week at a budget-friendly hotel for under $1,000. 960 1280

  

Family deals at the Myrtle Beach Sea Mist include admission to the resort's own water park. 960 1280

  

In the afternoon at Medomak Camp in Rockland, Maine, everyone heads to the lake. 960 1280

  

Swimming, sculling, sailing and, of course, kayaking are among the most popular activities at Medomak Camp. 960 1280

  

The Ace Adventure Center in Oak Hill, West Virginia boasts a prime location on the New River Gorge National River. 960 1280

  

At the Ace, you can carve some family-bonding time into the summer with wild outdoor adventures for one set price. 960 1280

  

Shake up your summer routine with an urban getaway to Boston. 960 1280

  

With no slush and snow underfoot, it's a great time for a stroll along Boston's Freedom Trail. 960 1280