Why We Love Australia

Hugh Jackman, Ayers Rock, the didgeridoo, Nicole Kidman, kangaroos and the Great Barrier Reef are just a few reasons why we love Australia.
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We love sexy Australian actor Hugh Jackman and his portrayals of superhero Wolverine in X-Men and rugged ranch hand Drover in Australia. Other notable Aussie actors include Sam Worthington, Eric Bana, Simon Baker, Geoffrey Rush, Errol Flynn and Heath Ledger.

We love the picturesque view of Sydney Harbor at night. Adventurous travelers can climb the Sydney Harbor Bridge. Or, if that’s not your thing, check out a performance at the Sydney Opera House, which is also located on the harbor.

We love Bondi Beach and the Aussie beach culture. Surfing and saving lives is so important that there’s an annual competition called the Surf Life Saving Championships, in which surf lifesavers or lifeguards showcase their skills.

Koalas

What’s not to love about this furry creature? Koalas, which are native to Australia, are found along the country’s eastern and southern coasts. The government has already taken precautions to protect the friendly marsupial by adding it to the list of priority species for conservation.

Macadamia Nuts

Australians call them Queensland nuts, bush nuts or bauple nuts, but in the US, we know them as macadamia nuts. They are the only plant food native to Australia that is produced and exported in significant quantities.

Aussie actress Nicole Kidman has been in a few movies that we love, including The Hours, Rabbit Hole, Cold Mountain and Moulin Rouge. We’d be remiss if we didn’t mention other Australian actresses, including Naomi Watts and Cate Blanchett.

We love the Outback and Australia’s rugged landscape, including Uluru, which is also known as Ayers Rock. The large sandstone rock formation, located in the southern part of the Australia’s Northern Territory, is home to several springs, water holes, rock caves and ancient paintings. Ayers Rock is sacred to the Aboriginal people in the area, and it’s listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Didgeridoo

Hearing the sound of a didgeridoo is a clear sign that you’re in the land Down Under. The wind instrument, which was developed by Australian Aborigines more than 1,000 years ago, is described as a natural wooden trumpet or drone pipe. Traditionally, only men play the didgeridoo and sing during ceremonial occasions.

Kangaroos

The kangaroo is the national symbol of Australia. It’s used on the Australian coat of arms, on some of the country’s currency, and in the logos of some well-known organizations, including the Australian airline Qantas. We think they’re cool because they’re the only large animals that hop as a means to get around.

Australia Wallabies Rugby Team

We enjoy watching the competitive spirit of the Australia Wallabies, the national men’s rugby team. Cricket, soccer, netball, hockey, motorsports and swimming are other popular sports in Australia.

Real Aussies eat Vegemite, a dark brown food paste made from yeast extract. You’ll be surprised to know that Kraft Foods, an American company, produces the tasty paste in mass quantities. So why not try it yourself on (of course) a piece of Melba toast? Other popular foods Down Under include meat pies and sausage sizzles at barbecue stalls.

Listed as one of the sexiest men alive, celebrity chef Curtis Stone has made us fall in love with the joys of cooking. The Melbourne native began cooking with his grandmother at age 5, and now he’s a star, making guest appearances on Iron Chef America, The Biggest Loser, Top Chef Masters and The Apprentice.

Take a trip down the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Australia, to see the 12 Apostles — limestone rock stacks off the shore of Port Campbell National Park. We love communing with nature, taking road trips and strolling along the beach.

We also enjoy exploring new territory, especially if it’s the Great Barrier Reef, the world’s largest coral reef system. It’s located in the Coral Sea near Queensland and stretches more than 1,600 miles. The reef’s diverse marine life consists of thousands of species, including saltwater crocodiles, humpback whales, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks and 400 coral species.

We love beer, and so do our Australian mates. There’s nothing better than ending a long day by sipping a glass of Foster’s Lager, an internationally distributed Australian brand.

We love the fun-loving, adventurous attitude that sometimes characterizes what we like to think is the typical Aussie. A good example is the late crocodile hunter Steve Irwin, who lived on the edge.

We love the Gold Coast, a major tourist destination in Queensland. The coastal city makes a lot of money from its booming tourism industry. The Gold Coast is known for its sunny subtropical climate, beautiful surfing beaches, intricate canal and waterway systems, lush rain forest, and hopping nightlife.

And of course, there's pop and dance-music diva Kylie Minogue and other great Australian music makers, including the Little River Band, the Bee Gees, Olivia Newton-John, Midnight Oil, Air Supply, AC/DC and INXS.