• Caribbean

All-Inclusive Caribbean Beach Resorts

Check out Oyster.com's picks for the best all-inclusive beach resorts in the Caribbean.

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Gustavia

Gustavia

Gustavia, the capital of St. Barts, was named for King Gustav III of Sweden. Fort Karl and Fort Gustav are popular areas for hikers, and if you’re not into hiking, then go shopping. This city has several high-end boutiques -- an essential source of revenue for the island. And don’t forget to take a stroll around the harbor to sneak a peek at some of the extravagant yachts. 960 1280

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Kitesurfing

Kitesurfing

Go kitesurfing on the beach in Grand Cul de Sac. This watersport is quickly becoming one of the most popular sports on the island. Local companies offer kitesurfing lessons, but they can be pricey, costing up to $300 for a 3-hour lesson. 960 1280

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Grand Cul de Sac Beach

Grand Cul de Sac Beach

Located in the northeastern part of St. Barts, Grand Cul de Sac Beach is a beachgoer’s haven. Windsurfing, swimming, sunbathing and snorkeling are just a few activities that will keep you preoccupied when visiting. 960 1280

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Hotel Guanahani & Spa

Hotel Guanahani & Spa

Stay at the Hotel Guanahani and you will quickly realize why this beautiful resort attracts celebrities, including Bethenny Frankel, a former cast member on the Real Housewives of New York. Amenities include a pool, top-notch spa, tennis courts and delicious dining options. The beach by the hotel offers numerous activities, but it’s relatively small. So guests have been known to plan day trips to the nearby beaches. 960 1280

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St. Barts Bucket Regatta

St. Barts Bucket Regatta

St. Barts has a few fun festivals, including the St. Barts Bucket Regatta, St. Barts Music Festival and the St. Barts Film Festival. The Bucket Regatta is a sailing race extended to yacht owners, captains, crews and guests. A percentage of the race's entry fee usually goes to a local charity on the 8-mile-long island. 960 1280

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French Cuisine

French Cuisine

La Route des Boucaniers, Eddy’s, Le Grain de Sel, Bonito Saint Barth and The Hideaway are a few places to wine and dine when vacationing in St. Barts. There are more than 80 restaurants to suit your taste, but French cuisine is king here. The seafood is fresh, and some of the top-quality provisions to restaurants arrive regularly from Paris. Bon appétit! 960 1280

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Anse du Governeur

Anse du Governeur

Relax on one of St. Barts most secluded and most popular places for nude sunbathing. Tourists should plan accordingly because there are no restaurants or other services in the area.  However, Anse du Gouverneur provides beachgoers with a great view of St. Kitts, Saba and St. Eustatius. And it’s a romantic spot to watch the sun set -- with or without clothes. 960 1280

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Sailing

Sailing

St. Barts is a popular destination for yachting and sailing. Gustavia’s harbor has mooring and docking facilities for 40 yachts. Public, Corossol and Colombier are spots to stop when sailing in the area. Tourists can charter sailing and motorboats, and explore St. Barts above and below the ocean -- thanks to local companies like the Yellow Submarine and Jicky Marine Service. 960 1280

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Le Gaiac Restaurant

Le Gaiac Restaurant

Taste the amazing food served at the Hotel Le Toiny’s popular restaurant, Le Gaiac.  Well-renowned Chef Stephane Mazieres blends innovative French cuisine with local flavors -- adding to some of the dishes -- vegetables grown in the restaurant’s organic green house. And rumor has it that Le Gaiac is the popular spot for Sunday brunch, serving scallops ravioli, yellow tail snapper on a skewer, watermelon and vegetable salad and much more. 960 1280

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Hotel Carl Gustaf

Hotel Carl Gustaf

Although it’s a 5-minute walk from the closest beach, Hotel Carl Gustaf is a luxury hotel that embodies the French Riviera style of St. Barts -- with mind-blowing ocean views and first-class service. Booking one of the 14 rooms isn’t cheap, but each suite and villa comes with its own private pool or plunge pool and private terrace, overlooking the ocean. 960 1280

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Le Ti St. Barts

Le Ti St. Barts

The nightlife is alive and well in St. Barts. Visit Le Ti St. Barts, a funky Caribbean tavern with an endless wine list, tasty food and great music -- necessary for patrons who want to dance into the wee hours of the morning. In addition to entrees like seared tuna with caviar, the provocatively-named desserts are just as delightful, like the Nymph Thighs -- airy lemon cake with vanilla custard.  Other hot night spots include le Select, Do Brazil and Le Bête à Z'Ailes. 960 1280

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Hispaniola

Hispaniola

Christmas Day 1492 wasn’t all glad tidings and good cheer for Christopher Columbus. On a journey to the northern coast of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, one of Columbus’ 3 ships, the Santa Maria, ran aground and had to be abandoned. It was the first of Columbus’ 4 voyages to the Americas. 960 1280

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Bay of Arrows

Bay of Arrows

Columbus didn’t exactly get a warm welcome when he landed on the Samana Peninsula (in present-day Dominican Republic). He met with violent resistance from the Ciguayos, one of the nations of the Caribbean islands. Because of the Ciguayos' use of arrows, Columbus called the inlet where he encountered them the Bay of Arrows. Historians have since debated its exact location: Some say it is the Bay of Rincon, others that it is Samana Bay. 960 1280

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Lisbon

Lisbon

The good times kept on coming as Columbus headed for Spain, on the last leg of his first voyage. He soon had to put those plans on hold, as a storm forced his fleet into Lisbon. There Columbus anchored next to Portugal King John II’s harbor partrol ship. Columbus spent the next week in Portugal, before he was able to continue on to Spain. 960 1280

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La Navidad

La Navidad

Nine months later, Columbus once again set sail for the high seas. This time, on his second voyage, he returned to Hispaniola, where he intended to visit the fort of La Navidad (built during his first voyage). However, Columbus discovered that the fort, located on the northern coast of Haiti, had been destroyed by the native Taino people. Centuries later, in 1977, an amateur archeologist excavated artifacts from La Navidad. 960 1280
La Isabela

La Isabela

It seemed like a good idea at the time. When Columbus sailed more than 60 miles eastward, along Hispaniola’s northern coast, he established the settlement of La Isabela, in present-day Dominican Republic. But in 1494 and then, in 1495, the settlement was struck by 2 North Atlantic hurricanes. Hunger, disease and mutiny soon followed, until Columbus abandoned the settlement altogether. 960 1280

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Cuba ... Part of Asia?

Cuba ... Part of Asia?

That's what Columbus was thinking when he arrived in Cuba (which he named Juana) on April 30, 1494. Exploring the island’s southern coast, Columbus placed his bets that it was part of a peninsula connected to mainland Asia. 960 1280

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Gulf of Paria

Gulf of Paria

And this must be the Garden of Eden! That’s what Columbus concluded as he sailed the Gulf of Paria (between present-day Trinidad and Venezuela). The nice climate, the abundance of food, the friendliness of the natives and the richness of the area’s natural resources all led him to that conclusion. He also wagered that, based on the rotation of the pole star in the sky, the Earth must not be perfectly spherical, but rather bulged out like a pear around the new-found continent we now know as South America. 960 1280
Tropical beach, Hispaniola

Tropical beach, Hispaniola

Columbus wasn’t feeling so well when he returned to Hispaniola on Aug. 19, 1498, during his third voyage. He felt even worse when he discovered that many of the Spanish settlers of the new colony were in rebellion against his rule, saying that Columbus had misled them about the supposedly bountiful riches of the New World. 960 1280

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Santo Domingo

Santo Domingo

Columbus’ fourth and final voyage met with choppy waters in June 1502. When his fleet arrived in Santo Domingo, it was denied port by the new governor. But Columbus got his revenge. He told the governor a storm was coming. The gov didn’t listen … to his demise. He ended up surrendering to the sea, along with 29 of his 30 ships. 960 1280

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Belen River, Panama

Belen River, Panama

Columbus’ 4 ships took a bruising while cruising through present-day Panama. Locals had told Columbus about gold and a strait to another ocean. Columbus set out on an exploration and established a garrison at the mouth of Panama’s Belen River. In April 1503, one of Columbus’ ships became stranded in the river. Meanwhile, the garrison was attacked by the Guaymí locals. Further headaches followed when shipworms damaged the ships at sea. 960 1280

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St Ann's Bay, Jamaica

St Ann's Bay, Jamaica

Columbus’ ships sustained further damage when a storm hit off the coast of Cuba. Unable to travel on, the fleet was beached in St. Ann’s Bay, in Jamaica. For 1 year, Columbus and his men remained stranded in Jamaica before help arrived. In all, Columbus’ voyages stretched over 12 years, and -- a few misadventures aside -- opened the door to the “New World." 960 1280
Sandy Island

Sandy Island

Drop your anchor and enjoy a romantic day on beautiful, uninhabited Sandy Island -- just a 30-minute boat ride from Petite Anse. The island has numerous coconut trees. So if you need a break from snorkeling or bird watching -- crack open a coconut and sit on the beach with the cool, crystal-blue water lapping at your feet. 960 1280

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Jamesby Island

Jamesby Island

Relax, go sunbathing or take a swim off the coast of Jamesby Island. One of 5 isles in Tobago Cays, this island has the smallest beach in the area. 960 1280

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Windstar Cruise

Windstar Cruise

Take an exciting Windstar Cruise through St. Lucia, located northeast of St. Vincent and northwest of Barbados, in the Caribbean Sea. Climb aboard a luxurious ship for a unique voyage where fun is at your fingertips - book shore excursions, enjoy a candle-lit dinner, listen to live entertainment, work-out in the fitness facility, rent water sports equipment and more. 960 1280

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Hiking in St. Lucia

Hiking in St. Lucia

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Tobago Cays

Tobago Cays

Located in the southern Grenadines, the Tobago Cays is an archipelago that consists of 5 small uninhabited islands -- Petit Rameau, Petit Bateau, Baradol, Petit Tabac and Jamesby.  A popular port of call for cruise ships, Tobago Cays draws thousands of tourists for diving, snorkeling and sports fishing. 960 1280

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Sandals La Toc Golf Resort & Spa

Sandals La Toc Golf Resort & Spa

If staying dry and on land is your speed -- enjoy a game of golf at the Sandals La Toc Golf Resort and Spa in St. Lucia. Sharpen your club-selection skills on this 3,141-yard course, where several holes demand laser-like accuracy for the perfect shot. Rolling hills and majestic fairways inspire performance at all levels. 960 1280

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St. George's, Grenada

St. George's, Grenada

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Scuba Diving near St. Vincent

Scuba Diving near St. Vincent

St. Vincent is a scuba diver’s paradise. The island offers some of the best diving in the Caribbean, with numerous reefs, shipwrecks, caves and caverns for underwater adventurers to explore. 960 1280

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River Antoine Rum Distillery

River Antoine Rum Distillery

Looking for local spirits in Grenada? Head to the River Antoine Rum Distillery where a potent rum (only sold on the island) is produced the same way it was when the distillery opened in 1785. Today, the distillery functions primarily as a museum; so rum is produced in limited quantity. If inclined, tourists have the option to sample a less strong version of River’s rum. 960 1280

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Bridgetown, Barbados

Bridgetown, Barbados

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Princess Margaret Beach

Princess Margaret Beach

St. Vincent and the Grenadines consists of 32 islands and cays located in the southern Caribbean. One of the islands, Bequia, has several beaches perfect for swimming and sunbathing, including Princess Margaret Beach (pictured). Tourists will need a water or land taxi to get here. We recommend grabbing a bite to eat at Max's Bar and then, after an hour, you can swim, snorkel or take a stroll along the beach to burn off a few calories. 960 1280

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Kingstown

Kingstown

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Villa Beach

Villa Beach

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La Soufrière

La Soufrière

Go on an adventure and hit St. Vincent’s most popular hiking trail near La Soufrière and its crater lake. The 4,049-foot-tall active volcano is the highest point on the island. The last time this majestic beauty erupted was in April 1979. 960 1280

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