Daily Escape

gasadalur, denmark, faroe islands, vagar, coastal, waterfall

Photo by Robert Harding World Imagery / Getty Images

Town of Gasadalur

Faroe Islands, Denmark

Located halfway between Norway and Iceland, the Faroe Islands are a captivating collection of 18 remote islands. Regarded by many experts as the world’s most unspoiled islands, the islands’ pristine natural landscape captivates adventurers who come here for the famed Faroese houses with their grass roofs, to sail on the choppy waters like the Vikings of yore and to gaze at the enchanting waterfall on the remote island of Gasadalur.


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