Daily Escape

Pont Alexandre III

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Pont Alexandre III

Paris, France

Enjoy one of Paris’ most scenic nighttime walks -- a stroll from Les Invalides over the Pont Alexandre III bridge. Start in the city’s 7th arrondissement, where by day you can explore Les Invalides, a neighborhood home to  a host of military and historic museums and monuments dedicated to France’s military history. As the sun sets, stroll over the Pont Alexandre III bridge and marvel at the grand design of the single steel arch, adorned with ornate lamps, cherubs, nymphs and winged horses. The bridge may even look familiar, having been used as a backdrop in Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris and Adele’s “Someone Like You” video. 


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