Daily Escape

Tikal National Park

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Tikal National Park

Petén, Guatemala

If the Mayans were right, then there isn’t much time left to marvel at Tikal National Park in Guatemala, home to one of the largest archaeological sites of Mayan civilization. Take a trip into history as you climb to the top of the 230-foot Tikal Temple IV for the view. Tikal means “place of voices,” and among the ruins you may not hear the voices of ancient Mayans, but you will hear the voices of the lush surrounding jungle full of screeching spider monkeys. Learn how you can support America’s national parks – visit www.nationalparks.org


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