Daily Escape

Amar Sagar Lake

Photo by Flicka, Wikimedia Commons

Amar Sagar Lake

Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Located outside of Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, a magical corner in northwestern India, the serene Amar Sagar Lake is punctuated by intricately carved and domed pavilions. They’re architectural extensions of the neighboring Amar Sagar Palace, built by a maharawal in the 17th century that is also heralded for its ornate murals and stone figureheads. The royal family has since come and gone, but this waterway remains a sanctuary -- for yoga, meditation and the birds.


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