Amazing Sights in Sri Lanka

Explore Sri Lanka, the small island off the coast of India. Check out some of the country's amazing sights, including the Golden Temple, Sigiriya rock, Yala National Park and Ramboda Falls.

Photos

Jerusalem’s Old City

Jerusalem’s Old City

A Hanukkah menorah (also known as a “chanukiah”) glows in front of the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, in Jerusalem's Old City. The 8-day festival commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem during the 2nd century B.C. 960 1280

Reuters/Ronen Zvulun  

Mumbai, India

Mumbai, India

The father of a slain rabbi's wife lights a menorah in front of the landmark Gateway of India monument in Mumbai, a month after militants attacked several sites in the city, including a Jewish cultural center, back in 2008. Mumbai is currently home to 8 synagogues. Plans are underway to rebuild the Jewish center.
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Pal Pillai/ AFP/ Getty Images  

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

A menorah stands on the White House Ellipse during the annual national Hanukkah menorah-lighting ceremony in Washington, DC. In 1979, Jimmy Carter became the first US president to participate in a public Hanukkah candle-lighting ceremony on the National Mall. Later, President Bill Clinton led the first ceremony of its kind inside the White House. 960 1280

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images  

NYC

NYC

Head to NYC to see the world’s largest Hanukkah menorah -- 32 feet high and weighing 4,000 pounds. The 9-branched, gold-colored steel candelabrum stands on Fifth Avenue and 59th Street, across from Central Park, during the holiday, and was designed by contemporary Israeli artist Yaacov Agam. 960 1280

Chris Hondros/Getty Images  

Berlin

Berlin

Rabbis Shmuel Segal and Yehuda Teichtal of the Jewish Orthodox group Chabad help erect a menorah in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate on Dec. 7, 2012, ahead of Hanukkah celebrations. These days, Berlin is seeing a resurgence of Jewish life, including an estimated 20,000 Israelis. 960 1280

Reuters/Thomas Peter   

Paris

Paris

With the Eiffel Tower in the background, the chief rabbi of France (right) and the Israeli ambassador to France (center), prepare to light a menorah on Dec. 20, 2011, at the Champs de Mars in Paris. These days, France is home to nearly 500,000 Jews. 960 1280

Mehdi Fedouach/AFP/Getty Images   

London’s Trafalgar Square

London’s Trafalgar Square

London’s Trafalgar Square glows from the light of a giant menorah, as a crowd watches the festivities unfold. The lighting ceremony is an annual event in this central London space, in a city that’s home to roughly 250,000 Jews. 960 1280

Reuters/Luke MacGregor   

South Beach Miami

South Beach Miami

A menorah made out of … seashells? Yep, that’s right. This towering creation -- made of more than 10,000 seashells, each personally collected by the artist himself -- was the handiwork of jazz musician Roger Abramson. 960 1280

Wally Gobetz, flickr  

Wollaton Hall

Wollaton Hall

Wollaton Hall, a country house in Nottingham, England, was the film location for Wayne Manor. It is open to the public, but don’t expect Bruce Wayne’s butler, Alfred, to greet you at the door. 960 1280

ExperienceNotts Media, Flickr   

Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon University

The prison breakout and brawl scene between Gotham City police officers and escaped prisoners was captured here at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Scenes were filmed at the university’s Software Engineering Institute and the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research. 960 1280

James Lin, Flickr  

The Farmiloe Building

The Farmiloe Building

Where did director Christopher Nolan film the Gotham City Police Department scenes? They were shot here at the Farmiloe Building in London. 960 1280

Matt Brown, Flickr  

Queensboro Bridge

Queensboro Bridge

Moviegoers witnessed explosions on bridges leading into and out of Gotham City. Action scenes and some of the faux explosion scenes were shot here on the Queensboro Bridge in Manhattan. 960 1280

Vincent Desjardins, Flickr  

Wall Street

Wall Street

Wall Street, NYC’s financial district, was the backdrop for the over-the-top battle scenes between Batman and his arch nemesis, Bane. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Mehrangarh Fort

Mehrangarh Fort

Spoiler alert! Battered and bruised Bruce Wayne aka Batman was one of only 2 people to crawl from a prison pit staged here at Mehrangarh Fort in Rajasthan, India. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Turda Saline

Turda Saline

Travel to Turda Saline, Romania -- a salt mine rumored to be the location of the Dark Knight’s infamous batcave. 960 1280

Cristian Bortes, Flickr  

Heinz Field

Heinz Field

Director Christopher Nolan used Pittsburgh’s Heinz Field to film a memorable movie scene. In The Dark Knight Rises, diabolical villain Bane sets off underground bombs that cause the football field to collapse under the feet of the football players, while fans watch in disbelief. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Trump Tower

Trump Tower

Not surprisingly, Trump Tower, located in Midtown Manhattan, was the film location for Wayne Enterprises’ headquarters -- where Bane and his motley crew unexpectedly take over the company. 960 1280

Kowloonese, Wikimedia Commons  

Chichen Itza is the largest known city of the Mayan civilization, located in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The powerful city flourished from AD 800 to 1200 and was a trading center for cloth, slaves, honey and salt. 960 1280

istockphoto  

The main attraction of Chichen Itza is the pyramid also known as El Castillo. Built sometime between 1000 and 1200, the pyramid was used as a temple to the god Kukulkan. Archaeologists believe that the pyramid also served as a calendar for the Mayas. In total it has 365 steps -- one for each day of the year. 960 1280

istockphoto   

The Christ the Redeemer statue stands at the top of the 2,330-foot-tall Corcovado Mountain, looming over the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 960 1280

istockphoto  

The 130-foot-tall statue of Jesus Christ was completed in 1931 and is made of reinforced concrete and soapstone. It is one of the largest Art Deco statues in the world, and it weighs in at 2.5 million pounds. 960 1280

Reuters  

The Roman Colosseum was built between AD 70 and 80, and it was in used for gladiatorial events, battle reenactments, animal hunts and other performances for 500 years. 960 1280

istockphoto  

The Colosseum sat nearly 50,000 spectators, and its design still influences the construction of modern-day amphitheaters. Earthquakes and stone-robbers have left the Colosseum in a state of ruin, but portions of the structure remain open to tourists. 960 1280

istockphoto  

The Great Wall of China, actually a series of many walls, stretches 5,500 miles across northern China. 960 1280

istockphoto  

Built between the 5th and 16th centuries BC to protect China's borders from invasion by nomadic tribes, the Great Wall is the world's longest manmade structure. 960 1280

istockphoto  

Machu Picchu, a 15th-century Inca archaeological site, sits 7,000 feet above sea level in the Andes Mountains of Peru. It is often referred to as the 'Lost City of the Incas,' because it was known only to locals until it was discovered in 1911 by American historian Hiram Bingham. 960 1280

istockphoto  

Archaeologists estimate that 1,200 Incas could have lived in Machu Picchu, although many believe it was most likely a retreat for Incan rulers, built as an estate for the emperor Pachacuti (1438-1472). 960 1280

Getty Images   

Petra, an archeological city in Jordan, is known for its dusty pink buildings carved out of rock and its impressive water conduit system. Built sometime around the 6th century BC, Petra was the capital city of the Nabataeans. 960 1280

istockphoto  

The entrance to the city of Petra is through a narrow gorge, flanked on either side by 250-foot cliffs. The most recognizable building in Petra is the Treasury, carved completely out of rock as a tomb for a Nanataean king. The building's façade stands almost 150 feet high. 960 1280

istockphoto  

Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan was so distraught by the passing of his third wife Mumtaz Mahal, that he commissioned an elaborate mausoleum to be built for her. The Taj Mahal shines as a symbol of eternal love and was built entirely of white marble. Construction stretched over a period of 22 years, beginning in the 1630s. 960 1280

istockphoto  

The Taj Mahal, located in Agra, India, is just one part of a vast complex that consists of a main gateway, an elaborate garden, a mosque, a guest house and several other magnificent buildings. 960 1280

istockphoto  


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