Daily Escape

Cliffs Of Moher

Photo by Getty Images

Cliffs Of Moher

County Clare, Ireland

If you are standing on this grass-carpeted karst, you are standing atop an otherworldly stretch of limestone landscape that mingles craggy cliffs and jagged rock, the arctic remnants of the Ice Age with Mediterranean flora like ferns and orchids. How is this possible, you might be asking yourself? The scenic UNESCO-protected site evolved from its warm, previous location south of the equator to its current Irish locale in northern Europe overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.


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Guinness

Guinness

A trip to Dublin wouldn’t be complete without a properly poured pint at the Guinness Storehouse, Ireland’s most popular tourist attraction. 960 1280

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Time for a pint?

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This sign, advertising a hair and skin clinic, was about to be removed and trashed when it was rescued and restored by the original sign maker. The “Why Go Bald” sign is so popular that it even has a Facebook fan page, and U2’s Bono claims that it’s his favorite Dublin landmark. 960 1280

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This sign reminds Dubliners to recycle, because, well, it’s just good karma. 960 1280

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This Paddy Power (an Irish bookmaking chain) location changed its name to O'Bama Power in honor of the US President and First Lady’s visit to Dublin. 960 1280

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When in Dublin, make sure you wear your parachute while driving, in preparation for when you may need to eject from your moving vehicle while it’s falling off a cliff into water. 960 1280

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This pub was named after a Dublin street character of the 1950s, a haggard-looking dog catcher who was said to have a face that resembled a hairy lemon. 960 1280

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Guinness Storehouse
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Old Jameson Distillery

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National Museum of Ireland

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National Gallery of Ireland

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The Book of Kells at Trinity College

The Book of Kells at Trinity College

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O'Connell Street

O'Connell Street

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On the Rocks  16 Photos