Daily Escape

Malahide Castle

Photo by iStock

Malahide Castle

Dublin, Ireland

Raise a goblet to Irish history, lads. The 12th-century Malahide Castle, located 9 miles outside of Dublin in the seaside village of Malahide, has reopened its history-heavy doors after a 10.5-million-euro renovation and expansion. Now you can almost hear the whispers of Sir Richard Talbot, whose descendents resided within these stone walls for more than 700 years, as you walk through the famous Great Hall. Look for ghosts, admire suits of armor, ramble through the never-before-opened Secret Garden, and restore yourself afterward with a well-made cappuccino in the swanky new visitor center.


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