Explore Kyoto, Japan

From the Yasaka Shrine to the Kyoto Imperial Palace, check out the attractions and foods of this Japanese city.

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

Photo By: Arthur Hsu

The entrance gates to the Yasaka Shrine, is a Shinto shrine famous for the Gion Matsuri, one of Japan’s largest festivals.

Kinkaku-ji, also known as the Temple of the Golden Pavilion, is a Zen Buddhist temple in northern Kyoto, whose top two floors are covered in gold leaf.

The grounds surrounding the Yasaka Shrine are lined with Japanese lanterns.

During a picturesque kaiseki meal, a small sashimi plate includes shrimp, salmon and toro.

A cat escaping the summertime heat takes a nap inside a stone lantern at Shusui-tei, a pond garden in the south end of the Kyoto Gyoen.

An interior view of the Kenshun-mon Gate at the Kyoto Imperial Palace. This gate was used by a Japanese empress and her mother.

A small waterfall down the trail from the Golden Pavilion.

Located in the Gion district, the Shiraume Ryokan, a traditional Japanese inn, has six rooms including the Umemi room with its tatami mats and private garden.

A view of the Kaito-ro, a covered bridge that connects the north edge of the Engetsu-chi pond and the north island, at Kyoto’s Shosei-en Garden.

Maruyama Park located among several temples is a great place to take a break and see statues of anti-shogunates Sakamoto Ryoma and Nakaoka Shintaro.

A view of Yasaka Shrine’s Main Hall and Buden Hall, which includes a dance stage.

A view through the Vermilion Torii Gates at the Kyoto Imperial Palace.

A dish of hamo, daggertooth pike conger, wrapped in bamboo leaf. This eel is revered in Kyoto and has so many bones that it requires a special knife and slicing technique.

The Boka-kaku gate at the Shosei-en Garden. The garden was originally completed in the 1657, but was destroyed by fires in 1858 and 1864, then rebuilt between 1865 and 1868.