Signs of the City: Tokyo

Check out these often curious signs from Shinjuku to Shibuya that speak to the culture of Japan in the bustling city of neon lights, Tokyo.

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Photo By: Photocapy, flickr

The business and entertainment district of Shinjuku is constantly flooded with people – over 2 million a day.

This sign in the Tokyo airport reminds you to keep a close watch on your luggage, or a ninja might swipe it.

The district of Akihabara is known for its shopping, particularly if you're looking for anime souvenirs.

No matter what street you wander down in Tokyo, watch out for sensory overload.

The fashionable area of Shibuya Crossing is known for its nightlife and is often compared to Times Square with its towering electronic billboards.

With a culture known for its animation, it's no surprise that even the traffic signs in Tokyo are expertly drawn.

In Tokyo, there's a sign for everything -- even one asking you to please apply your makeup at home.

Everyone needs a massage once in a while, especially if you're feeling pain like this.

Paper lanterns like this one can be found all over the city.

Sometimes, in a busy city like Tokyo, residents have to be reminded to slow down.

You have to admire the aesthetic qualities of Japanese signage, even if the spelling isn't always correct.

Safety is important on construction sites. Now if only we knew what we were being warned about.

Even the backstreets of Shinjuku glow with an endless array of neon lights.

Lost your hat? Go fishing for a new one!

At Ueno Zoo, do not feed the monkeys or their stomachs will grow to unnatural proportions.

You don't have to always know what's going on to appreciate a good sign.