Daily Escape

small chairs set out at dusk of camp in desert

Photo by Aitken Spence Hotels / Desert Nights Camp, Oman

Desert Nights Camp

Al Wasil, Oman

Experience a night in the desert as you never imagined, with spectacular craggy mountains in the distance, endless dunes and crystalline wadis, just 2 hours from the capital of Muscat, Oman.


You Might Also Like

greenland, iceberg, top 10 natural wonders
Glaciers and Icebergs, Greenland

Glaciers and Icebergs, Greenland

Combine the world's largest island with a total population of only 55,000 and Greenland provides the perfect backdrop for a true bonding experience with nature. Rent a kayak, originally invented by hunters here, and row arctic waters past towering icebergs and glaciers. The waters provide a home to many whale species, including humpbacks with tails up to 16 feet wide. Outdoor excursion opportunities abound, from mountain climbing to hiking and angling -- just be sure to bundle up! Temperatures range from 20 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer and much colder in the winter. Experience round-the-clock daylight during the arctic summer or watch the Northern Lights paint dazzling colors across the dark autumn skies. 960 1280
Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

The Great Barrier Reef's vibrant coral and fish form an underwater tropical paradise that promises the best scuba diving and snorkeling in the world. Spanning more than 1,200 miles of crystal waters along the coastline, the reef system is the largest and healthiest anywhere. Its isolation from the mainland will put you one-on-one with marine life, seemingly cut off from human contact. Australia offers countless other natural gems in the raw wilderness of its outback, so after exploring the depths of the sea, you can hop in a four-wheel drive and adventure in a totally different world. 960 1280
Grand Prismatic Springs, Yellowstone, Wyoming

Grand Prismatic Springs, Yellowstone, Wyoming

More than 1,000 miles of backcountry hiking trails through Yellowstone lead travelers to pristine areas rich with extraordinary wildlife and steaming, bubbling hot springs. Your chances at spotting an endangered grizzly or elk are pretty good -- the park is home to the largest elk herd in North America and one of two grizzly bear populations. You'll no doubt leave with everlasting images of the grand sweep of the rugged Teton mountain range and nature's fireworks leaping from the geysers. 960 1280

Lorcel/iStock/Getty Images  

Redwood National Park, California

Redwood National Park, California

Visitors here cannot help but feel awestruck by the unbelievable enormity of the coast redwoods, the tallest and oldest trees on earth. The tallest redwood on record, known simply as "the Tall Tree," is 600 years old and stands more than 350 feet. These majestic examples of nature, which can only be found in California and Oregon, take 400 years to mature and can live to be 2,000-plus years old. Emerging from the darkened paths on foot, bike or horseback, visitors may be shocked to find it is still daylight, and still the 21st century, in a place where time seems to stand still. 960 1280
Mt. Everest, Nepal

Mt. Everest, Nepal

The Sherpas and Tibetans worship Everest as Chomolongma, or "Mother Goddess of the Earth." Luckily you don't need to actually climb the 29,000 feet to the "Top of the World" to experience its magnificence and the beauty of the surrounding valleys and forests. 960 1280
Emerald Landscape, Ireland

Emerald Landscape, Ireland

Though all of Ireland's landscape is stunning, the southwest region shows visitors at first glance why this is called the Emerald Isle. Lush green pastures stretch as far as the eye can see, and the colorful hills are cut with winding streams. The Lakes of Killarney offer some of the most refreshing natural scenery in the south, which can best be explored by bike or on foot. Take the time to visit the picturesque small towns and villages, like Adare and Kinsale, whose charm and tranquillity will soothe the soul. 960 1280
Diverse Ecosystem, Costa Rica

Diverse Ecosystem, Costa Rica

Thanks to the biological influences of neighboring North and South America and the Pacific and Caribbean oceans, this small mountainous country is home to one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet. Thousands of miles of roads and nature trails make it easy to experience the wide spectrum of habitats, from steaming volcanoes to the cloud-shrouded jungles and deserted beaches. A model National Conservation System protects Costa Rica's invaluable natural heritage, including 9,000 different kinds of flowering plants and more species of birds than in the United States, Canada and northern Mexico combined. 960 1280
Gran Sabana, Venezuela

Gran Sabana, Venezuela

Located within Canaima, a national park the size of Belgium, Gran Sabana is the plateau region between Venezuela and Brazil. The hauntingly beautiful landscape is dominated by the unique "tepuyes" -- flat-topped mountains with steep vertical walls. Tours by jeep and canoe are popular ways of seeing the most scenic spots, but to get the full experience, guided walking tours are the way to go. The dense jungles house exotic plant life, some 20,000 species of orchid alone, and several species of endangered animals, including jaguars and giant armadillos. The rock is some of the oldest on Earth, dating back two billion years, making it one of the nine most ancient geological regions of the world. 960 1280

By Paolo Costa Baldi (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons  

Desert Sand Dunes, South Africa

Desert Sand Dunes, South Africa

The southern states of Africa have been the most successful in not only conserving its diverse wildlife, but also in offering visitors the privacy and isolation of intimate camps apart from the mass tourism more common in the north. You'll surely want to plan a safari in one of these regions where more than 90% of the continent's rhinos and the largest herds of elephants can be found. Africa's stunning landscape of coastal cliffs, enormous desert sand dunes and magnificent waterfalls have been shaped by over four billion years of geological activity. 960 1280
Galapagos Islands

Galapagos Islands

A trip to these enchanted islands puts humans in a unique and humbling second-place position to the untamed plant and animal life. Here we are mere visitors to the inhabitants of the protected national park that covers 97% of the land area. The islands were named after the giant tortoises that bask boldly on the sandy beaches and mingle with their reptilian brethren, most notably the marine iguana -- the only aquatic iguana in the world. Birds are the most diverse and abundant on the islands, many having evolved into unique species that can only be found here. 960 1280

By Pete from USA (Bartolome View) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

outdoors and adventure, camping, gear guide, tent
Tent

Tent

Plan on spending a night or 2 under the stars? Picking a tent is important. Consider durability, size, space and proper ventilation when purchasing a tent because close quarters can easily become a claustrophobic nightmare. Choose wisely. 960 1280

Connor Walberg / Getty Images   

GPS

GPS

A compass or GPS device is your best guide around unfamiliar territory. It's a must-have on any campers list of things to pack. 960 1280

Creativ Studio Heinemann / Getty Images  

Flashlight

Flashlight

Pack a sturdy flashlight and fresh batteries. You never know when you may need it for an emergency or to help spot things that go bump at night, right outside your tent. 960 1280

Hero Images / Getty Images  

Sleeping Bag

Sleeping Bag

Make sure you have a down sleeping bag when planning your next outdoor adventure. A sleeping mat or pad underneath your sleeping bag will help make your night underneath the stars more comfortable. 960 1280

Soren Pilman / Getty Images  

Rain Gear

Rain Gear

Good rain gear, including a rain coat, is important to keep campers dry during stormy weather. 960 1280

Sam Edwards / Getty Images  

Backpack

Backpack

A backpack is a hiker's best friend. Pack it with snacks, water and all your hiking essentials, and hit the trails. Backpacks come in a variety of sizes and some are made specifically to handle all forms of extreme weather. 960 1280

Jordan Siemens / Getty Images  

Insect Repellant

Insect Repellant

It's a must-have item to pack for your next trip outdoors. Insect repellant is a camper's first line of defense against bugs, including those pesky mosquitos. 960 1280

Chad Springer / Getty Images  

Fire Starter Kit

Fire Starter Kit

Yes, you can start fires the old-fashioned way, but we suggest you come prepared with lighter fluid, paper, wood, matches or a lighter to help start your campfire.  Of course, make sure you follow the campground's fire safety guidelines. 960 1280

Hero Images / Getty Images  

Gas Stove

Gas Stove

A small gas stove is helpful to make elaborate, but quick meals while you're camping. Wake up to a pot of coffee in the morning or make a meal out of whatever you bring to eat or catch in the woods. 960 1280

HansChris / Getty Images  

Sunblock

Sunblock

Don't forget to pack sunblock, especially if you're camping in the heat of the hot sun during the summer. This is especially important for hikers who enjoy long, arduous treks along clearly marked trails in the wilderness. 960 1280

Catherine Ledner / Getty Images  

S'mores

S'mores

A good camping experience must include non-perishable food, including s'mores. You can't resist the chocolaty goodness melting over a couple marshmallows and carefully wedged between 2 graham crackers. 960 1280

Jamie Grill / Getty Images  

Pocket Knife

Pocket Knife

A pocket knife is a camper's ultimate multi-tool. It comes equipped with a magnifying glass, cork screw and small knife to get you out of a bind. 960 1280

Giorgio Fochesato / Getty Images  

Sandwich Maker

Sandwich Maker

You don't really need to be elaborate when cooking meals over a campfire, but something like this sandwich maker is perfect for making grilled cheese sandwiches when you're tired of the regular camp food faire like hot dogs or hamburgers. 960 1280

Tobias Titz / Getty Images  

Hiking Boots

Hiking Boots

Find a sturdy, comfortable pair of shoes or boots that have good tread -- necessary on hiking trails that are sometimes dangerously close to a steep drop-off. 960 1280

Katja Kircher / Getty Images  

Cooler

Cooler

A cooler keeps your food safe when you're not eating. Store it in the car when you're done munching on a snack, lunch or light dinner to keep away unexpected visitors. Odorless garbage bags are an alternate option if you don't want to drag a cooler to the campgrounds. 960 1280

Philip Lee Harvey / Getty Images  

Lantern

Lantern

A lantern always comes in handy for late-night reading in the tent or if you're just looking for a better way to brighten things up without relying on the light from fireflies at night. 960 1280

Stephen Swintek / Getty Images  

Skógafoss
Skógafoss

Skógafoss

With a 200-foot drop, Skógafoss — located in Skógar, Iceland — rivals Gullfoss as the country’s most famous and tallest waterfall. According to legend, the first Viking settler in the area buried a treasure chest in the cave behind the waterfall. Locals found the chest but were able to grasp only a ring, which is now on display at an area museum. Designated camping areas and hiking trails along the Skógá River have made this waterfall a popular tourist spot. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Rhine Falls

Rhine Falls

The best time to visit Switzerland’s Rhine Falls is between April and October. Tourists flock to the city of Schaffhausen to see the falls via a guided boat tour or train ride. Outdoor enthusiasts can also visit Adventure Park, the country’s largest rope park, built at the Rhine Falls. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Cummins Falls

Cummins Falls

The namesake attraction of Cummins Falls State Park in Tennessee isn't easy to get to, accessible only by foot through some steep terrain. The reward, though, is a scenic dip below the 75-foot falls in one of the country's most popular secret swimming holes. 960 1280

Cummins Falls Tennessee  

Murchison Falls

Murchison Falls

Murchison Falls, aka Kabarega Falls, is a waterfall on the Nile River in Uganda. At the top of the falls, the Nile is forced through a 23-foot-wide gap in the rocks (seen on the far right) that flows westward into Lake Albert. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Victoria Falls

Victoria Falls

Take a look at this aerial view of Victoria Falls, found on the Zambezi River in Zimbabwe. Scottish missionary and explorer David Livingstone, who is believed to have been the first European to view the falls, named the site in honor of Queen Victoria. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Havasu Falls

Havasu Falls

Havasu Falls in Supai, AZ, is one of the most famous and most visited waterfalls in the Grand Canyon. The site consist of 1 main chute that drops over a 120-foot vertical cliff. Hikers can relax, stop for lunch and sit at the picnic tables near the waterfall. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

La Cascata del Sasso

La Cascata del Sasso

The Metauro River falls over the layers of limestone to create La Cascata del Sasso in Marche, an eastern Italian region. It is one of the 10 largest waterfalls in Italy. Below the waterfall, the lake is surrounded by willow and poplar trees. And it’s also a hot spot for fishermen, who will find rare species including the kingfisher. 960 1280

Gengish Skan, Flickr  

Yosemite Falls

Yosemite Falls

Deep in the heart of California's Yosemite National Park, tourists marvel at this waterfall wonder. With its 2,425-foot drop, Yosemite Falls is the sixth-tallest waterfall in the world. The Ahwahneechee, a group of Native American people who lived in the Yosemite Valley, believed that the pool at the base of the falls was inhabited by the spirits of several witches. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Iguazu Falls

Iguazu Falls

A trip to Brazil or Argentina isn’t complete without making a trip to Iguazu Falls. The waterfall runs along the border of the 2 countries and divides the Iguazu River into upper and lower sections. An old legend claims that the falls were created when an angry god split the river in 2 after his fiancée ran away with her lover on a canoe. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Seven Falls

Seven Falls

Take a steep climb up 224 steps to get a picturesque view from the peak of Seven Falls, a cascading waterfall in Colorado Springs, CO. While you’re there, hike the Trail to Inspiration Point or the Trail to Midnight Falls. The best time to enjoy the scenery and wildlife on these 2 trails is between May and October. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls is the collective name for 3 waterfalls — Horseshoe Falls (Canada), American Falls (US) and Bridal Veil Falls (US) — found on the Canadian-US border between Ontario and New York. The falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world. On average, almost 4 million cubic feet of water falls over the crest line in 1 minute. And in case you didn’t know, this waterfall is used as a source of hydroelectric power. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Warren Falls

Warren Falls

Visit the Mad River in Warren, VT. Although small when compared with other waterfalls, Warren Falls, aka Carleton Falls, is a perfect outdoor getaway for communing with nature. Take a relaxing stroll around the falls and along the river. 960 1280

Jeff Myers, Flickr  

Sutherland Falls

Sutherland Falls

Nestled in the woods behind the fog is Sutherland Falls in Milford Sound, New Zealand. The water spills 1,904 feet into 2 glacial lakes on the mountainside inside Fiordland National Park, making it the second-tallest waterfall in the country, behind Browne Falls in Doubtful Sound. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Huangguoshu Waterfall

Huangguoshu Waterfall

Located on the Baishui River in Anshun in the Guizhou province, Huangguoshu Waterfall is the largest in China. The falls reside in Huangguoshu National Park and consist of 18 waterfalls that vary in size. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Bouma Waterfalls

Bouma Waterfalls

Bouma Waterfalls, aka Tavoro Waterfalls — located in Fiji’s Bouma National Heritage Park — looks like a beautiful backdrop from a spectacular movie scene. It consists of 3 waterfalls. The tallest of the 3, Lower Bouma Falls, has a 78-foot drop. 960 1280

Tracey, Flickr   

Kaieteur Falls

Kaieteur Falls

Three times the height of Niagara Falls and twice the height of Victoria Falls, Kaieteur Falls plunges 822 feet into the lake below. The site, part of Kaieteur National Park, is a popular tourist attraction in the center of Guyana’s rain forest. Travelers arriving and departing from Ogle Airport and Cheddi Jagan International Airport may be able to catch a glimpse of the waterfall from the plane’s window. 960 1280

Soren Riise, Flickr  

The Hot List

Explore America’s most stunning scenery.
Join the conversation on Social Media!
Stay updated on the latest travel tips and trends.
Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.