Daily Escape

Castle of Sant Joan

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Castle of Sant Joan

Catalonia, Spain

The Castle of Sant Joan in the Costa Brava region of Spain has been overlooking this bay between the Lloret de Mar and Fenals beaches since the 11th century. The castle stood proud until the British Navy bombarded the fortifications in 1805 during the war of Britain against Spain and France, which left Sant Joan in ruins. It was restored in 1992 and visitors can climb the tower for one of the best coastal views in Catalonia.


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