Experience Spain and Morocco

Just 8 miles apart, Spain and Morocco may be coastal neighbors, but they're worlds apart -- now's your chance to explore them both before entering for a chance to win The Trip: 2014.

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Dubrovnik, Croatia
Welcome to King's Landing!

Welcome to King's Landing!

King’s Landing, or as it’s known in real life, Dubrovnik, a Croatian city nested on the shore of the Adriatic Sea. Durbovnik’s stone walls, dramatic cliffs and amazing views make it the perfect seat for the king(s) of Westeros. 960 1280

Image Source / Getty Images  

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Duncan Muggoch, line producer for scenes shot in Spain and Croatia, says it is sometimes hard to film around tourists in Dubrovnik. Sherpas were used to help the production crew haul equipment through the narrow and often steep streets to specific locations throughout the city. Fans will see Croatia in the first few episodes of the fifth season. A soup kitchen scene with Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) visiting High Sparrow (Jonathan Pryce) was filmed in Dubrovnik. 960 1280

Macall B. Polay/courtesy HBO  

The Alcazar, Seville, Spain

The Alcazar, Seville, Spain

In Seville, the upper levels of the Alcazar are home to the royal family, but the palatial estate’s lush gardens are transformed into the Water Gardens of Dorne in the Game of Thrones’ fourth and fifth seasons. The Alcazar’s staircases are so narrow that the production crew had to use cranes to transport equipment up to a few of the palace’s balconies. More than 8,000 visitors converge on the Alcazar each day, making it one of the most-visited attractions in Seville. 960 1280

Macall B. Polay/courtesy HBO  

Plaza de Toros, Osuna, Spain

Plaza de Toros, Osuna, Spain

Located in southern Spain, the Plaza de Toros is an old bullring and national monument that was transformed into a gladiator arena for a scene in the fifth season of Game of Thrones. Producers picked the popular attraction because the arena’s stone structure is similar to those found in Croatia, another place where scenes were filmed for the medieval-era drama. 960 1280

Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images  

Magheramorne Quarry, County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Magheramorne Quarry, County Antrim, Northern Ireland

While 1 crew was shooting scenes in Spain and Croatia, a second production crew filmed scenes at the quarry in Magheramorne, which is located on the shores of Loch Larne. This small town of 75 residents was transformed into a fishing village called Hardhome. In previous Game of Thrones episodes, the location was also used to film scenes of Castle Black (first season) and the Battle of Blackwater (second season). 960 1280

Helen Sloan/courtesy HBO  

Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland’s Mourne Mountains provided the scenery for Dany’s entrance into the Dothraki holy land. Of course, the Dothraki fighting horse statues are missing, so you’ll just have to imagine the iconic gate when you visit these breathtaking mountains. 960 1280

Moment Open / Getty Images  

Doune Castle, Scotland

Doune Castle, Scotland

The Lord's Tower and East Wall of Doune Castle in Scotland should look familiar to Game of Thrones fans. Poor little Bran fell (was pushed) out one of its windows in the first season, when he saw something he shouldn’t have. Originally built in the 13th century, Doune Castle features a nature walk through the grounds for visitors. 960 1280

Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images  

The Dark Hedges, Northern Ireland

The Dark Hedges, Northern Ireland

The Dark Hedges in Northern Ireland have played a major role in the Game of Thrones story, serving as the setting for the Kingsroad. But the area that surrounds the Dark Hedges should be a must-see for any fan, since it has been used to film Winterfell, Castle Black and the Stark family war encampment. 960 1280

Moment Open / Getty Images  

Downhill Beach and Mussenden Temple, Northern Ireland

Downhill Beach and Mussenden Temple, Northern Ireland

If you happen to be rooting for Stannis Baratheon, Downhill Beach and Mussenden Temple in Northern Ireland are your spots. Serving as the backdrop for Dragonstone Castle and Blackwater Bay, Downhill Beach was where Melisandre burned the old gods, issuing a new religion for Stannis’ followers. 960 1280

Moment Open / Getty Images  

Essaouira, Morocco

Essaouira, Morocco

This historic bastion in Essaouira, Morocco, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It also happens to have played the part of Astapor, the slave-trading city where Daenerys freed the Unsullied, including everyone’s favorite: Grey Worm. 960 1280

E+ / Getty Images  

Ouarzazate, Morocco

Ouarzazate, Morocco

Ouarzazate, a town in Morocco, is famous for the Atlas Film Corporation Studios, open to tourists for tours of the many sets left from movies like Babel and Kingdom of Heaven. Sets at this Morrocco studio stood in for the Free City of Pentos, and also served as the venue for Dany and Khal Drogo’s memorable wedding. 960 1280

Photolibrary / Getty Images  

Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon, Iceland

Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon, Iceland

At the Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon in Iceland, the Vatnajokull Ice Cap -- Europe’s largest ice cap -- serves as the ideal setting for the Land Beyond the Wall. Just look out for White Walkers! 960 1280

Stone / Getty Images  

Skaftafell National Park, Iceland

Skaftafell National Park, Iceland

Skaftafell National Park in Iceland was the setting of Jon Snow and Ygritte’s love story, from Jon Snow and Qhorin Halfhand’s sneak attack on the Wildlings to the near beheading of our favorite red-head. The park is open year round for GoT devotees or visitors just looking for a glacier hike. 960 1280

E + / Getty Images  

Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo
Capuchin Catacombs

Capuchin Catacombs

Down in the cold, dry basement of the Capuchin Monastery, on the outskirts of Palermo, Italy, are the remains of 8,000 people. When the monastery outgrew its original cemetery in 1599, catacombs were excavated beneath the building. In addition to friars interred here, well-known locals chose the crypts as their final resting place. The catacombs are open to the public; iron grills prevent visitors from touching or posing with those laid to rest here. 960 1280

Reuters  

Catacombs of Paris

Catacombs of Paris

A series of manholes and ladders lead visitors to the creepy catacombs of Paris. In 1786, the cemeteries of Paris churches were filled to overflowing. The government saw a solution in long-abandoned stone quarries in and around the capital. The resulting catacombs eventually became the final resting place of some 6 million people. Following a vandalism incident, the catacombs were closed to the public in September 2009, but reopened a few months later. 960 1280

Dave Shea, flickr  

Brno Ossuary

Brno Ossuary

The Brno Ossuary in the Czech Republic is estimated to hold the remains of more than 50,000 people, making it the second-largest site of its kind in Europe (behind the Paris Catacombs). The ossuary was established in the 17th century, partially under the Church of St. James. The ossuary was later forgotten, until its rediscovery in 2001. It has been open to public tours since June 2012. 960 1280

Kirk, Wikimedia Commons  

Monastery of San Francisco

Monastery of San Francisco

Below the monastery of San Francisco, in the historic center of Lima, Peru, creepy catacombs are filled with skulls and bones. The catacombs were established following the monastery’s construction (in 1774), and remained in use until 1808, when a city cemetery was founded outside of Lima. The catacombs were soon forgotten, until their discovery in 1943. An estimated 70,000 individuals’ remains fill the catacombs' narrow hallways and deep holes. 960 1280

Ray_from_LA, flickr  

St. Stephen’s Cathedral

St. Stephen’s Cathedral

Light peeks through the darkness at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna. Following its consecration in 1147 A.D., the cathedral's grounds gave way to cemeteries – a result of the high honor that believers placed on being buried near a church. Interments began in 1735 and continued until 1783, when a new law forbade most burials within the city. Today, the cathedral’s catacombs house the remains of more than 11,000 persons. 960 1280

Neil Girling, flickr  

St. Paul’s Catacombs

St. Paul’s Catacombs

St. Paul’s Catacombs, outside of Mdina, Malta, are a series of underground galleries and tombs that date from the fourth to the ninth centuries A.D. Intriguingly, the 24 catacombs, which cradle the tombs of more than 1,000 dead, show evidence of pagan, Jewish and Christian burials side-by-side, with no clear divisions. The excavation of the catacombs began in the late 1800s, under the guidance of a Maltese archaeologist and author. The site is now managed by a national agency, with 2 catacombs open to the public. 960 1280

Ian Lloyd, flickr   

Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa

Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa

The Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa (“Mound of Shards”) are a series of tombs in Alexandria, Egypt, that reach a depth of 100 feet. In the 2nd century A.D., they were built for a wealthy family … then forgotten until 1900, when a donkey fell into the access shaft. Human and animal remains have since been found, along with 3 sarcophagi. The catacombs’ name derives from visitors who used to visit the tombs and bring food in terra cotta jars to eat while there. They didn’t wish to bring the containers back home from this place of death, so they would break them … leaving shards behind. 960 1280

thecrawfordsphotos, flickr  

Sedlec Ossuary

Sedlec Ossuary

The Sedlec Ossuary is a small chapel in the Czech Republic that happens to have a whole lot of skeletons -- between 40,000 and 70,000, in fact. Some bones are arranged to form decorations in the chapel, including this chandelier of bones. The ghoulish designs are the handiwork of a 19th-century woodcarver who had been hired by an aristocratic family to arrange the bones, which had been interred in the ossuary since 1511. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Hallstatt Bone House

Hallstatt Bone House

Some visitors find the Bone House in Hallstatt, Austria, unexpectedly beautiful. We just find it creepy. The small chapel is home to a ghoulish display of 1,200 skulls. It came about in the 12th century, when the neighboring cemetery became filled to capacity. Cremation was forbidden, so bodies would be buried for about 15 years, then exhumed and placed in the chapel. Here, skulls are painted with a floral crown – a practice that began around 1720, in a gesture akin to placing flowers on a grave. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Skull Chapel

Skull Chapel

The Skull Chapel in Czerma, Poland, was built in 1776 by a local priest. The chapel serves as the mass grave for nearly 25,000 people who died during the Thirty Years War, 3 Silesian Wars (between Prussia and Austria), as well as from cholera outbreaks and hunger. The priest led the effort to collect the remains and put them in the chapel. The walls and basement are filled with skulls and bones; the remains of those who built the chapel are placed in the center of the church and on the altar. 960 1280

Merlin, Wikimedia Commons  

Capela dos Ossos

Capela dos Ossos

The Capela dos Ossos, or Chapel of Bones, in Évora, Portugal, gets its name from the human skulls and bones that cover its interior walls. The chapel was built in the 1500s by a Franciscan monk, who wanted his fellow monks to meditate hard on life’s transient nature. That message is driven home by some 5,000 skeletons, collected from nearby churches, as well as the words by the chapel’s entrance: “We, the bones that are here, await yours.” 960 1280

ceg, flickr  

Skull Tower

Skull Tower

In the early 1800s, Serbian rebels stood up to the Ottoman Empire. The Skull Tower was later built using the skulls of Serbs killed during a battle in 1809. In all, 952 skulls were collected and mounted on a tower as a warning to whoever opposed the empire. The tower stood in the open air until liberation of the area in southern Serbia in 1878. By then, much of the tower had eroded. In 1892, donations from all over Serbia led to the construction of a chapel, built around 58 skulls that still remained. 960 1280

Magalie L'Abbe, flickr  

Hampstead Garden Suburb
Hampstead Garden Suburb

Hampstead Garden Suburb

Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor was born to American parents in this northwest London suburb in February 1932. The youngest of 2 children, Taylor’s beauty was apparent early on. A mutation gave Taylor double eyelashes, and people would stop to behold her deep blue eyes, which appeared violet. 960 1280

Steve Cadman, flickr   

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Shortly before the start of World War II, Taylor’s parents returned to the US to avoid hostilities. Settling in Los Angeles, Taylor’s father established an art gallery, which soon attracted numerous Hollywood celebrities. This A-list crowd couldn’t help but notice the young Taylor’s beauty, and a star would soon be born. 960 1280

iStock   

San Joaquin River

San Joaquin River

One of Taylor’s earliest films, Lassie Come Home was filmed partly on location around the San Joaquin River. The largest river in central California, the 366-mile-long tributary was the setting for the 1943 film’s dramatic rapids scene. 960 1280

jcookfisher, flickr   

Pebble Beach, California

Pebble Beach, California

A year later, Taylor became a full-fledged star with the release of National Velvet. Much of the film was shot in this small coastal resort destination in California, which owes much of its picture-perfect scenery to granite rock outcroppings visible along the coast. 960 1280

iStock   

All Saints Episcopal Church

All Saints Episcopal Church

At 18, Taylor snagged her first adult role, in Father of the Bride. In the 1950 film, Taylor (as Kay Banks) walks down the aisle of this church at 504 North Camden Drive in Beverly Hills. In real life, Taylor married hotel heir Conrad Hilton the same year -- in what would be the first of her 8 marriages. 960 1280

Tony Hoffarth, flickr   

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

A dual citizen of the UK and US (the latter from 1977 on), Taylor visited London many times. She even appeared in a CBS TV special Elizabeth Taylor in London in 1963, taking viewers on a tour of various sites, including Westminster Bridge, Battersea Park and the House of Parliament. Here’s Taylor more than a decade earlier, at the age of 16, with a friend in Trafalgar Square. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Cascade Lake, California

Cascade Lake, California

This 170-foot-deep glacial lake was the backdrop for 1951’s A Place in the Sun. With luminous closeups of her perfectly symmetrical face, Taylor played American socialite Angela Vickers, the unattainable dream girl to the poor nephew of a rich industrialist. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Marfa, Texas

Marfa, Texas

This dusty town in West Texas was the site of 2 months of filming for the 1956 movie Giant, in which Taylor played socialite Leslie Lynnton. The town is also famous for the Marfa lights, visible on clear nights between Marfa and the Paisano Pass when facing southwest. 960 1280

Paul Lowry, flickr   

Oyster Bay, Long Island

Oyster Bay, Long Island

Two years later, Taylor had another hit with Cat on a Hat Tin Roof, the film adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ play. The film was shot in the town of Oyster Bay on Long Island. During filming, the 26-year-old Taylor suffered the loss of her third husband Mike Todd, who was killed in a plane crash. 960 1280

Hitchster, flickr   

S'Agaro, Spain

S'Agaro, Spain

Taylor signed on for another film adaption of a Tennessee Williams play. In Suddenly, Last Summer, Taylor played a young woman institutionalized for severe emotional disturbance. The film’s "Cabeza de Lobo" sequence was partly shot in this resort area (pictured), located in the coastal region of northeastern Spain. 960 1280

Freebird, flickr   

Fifth Avenue, NYC

Fifth Avenue, NYC

Taylor won her first Academy Award for her portrayal of part-model, part-call girl Gloria Wondrous in 1960’s Butterfield 8. Much of the film’s action occurred on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, including Fifth Avenue. By now, Taylor had married her fourth husband, Eddie Fisher, and proclaimed: “We’re house-hunting New Yorkers. Our home is here now, not in Hollywood.” 960 1280

iStock   

Rome

Rome

Liz and Dick -- the world’s most famous couple of the day met on the set of 1963’s Cleopatra. Playing the most beautiful woman of ancient times, Taylor was not to be outdone in real life: During filming in Rome, Taylor and the married actor began a very public affair. Four years later, the headline-grabbing couple returned to Italy to film The Taming of the Shrew. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Ritz Carlton, Montreal

Ritz Carlton, Montreal

After quickie divorces in Mexico from their spouses, Liz and Dick tied the knot in Montreal in 1964. The civil ceremony took place at the Ritz-Carlton hotel on 1228 Sherbrooke Street West, in the city’s luxurious Golden Square Mile area. It was Taylor’s fifth marriage, and Burton’s second. 960 1280

Ron Starr of Ron Starr Photography  

Liz and Dick's Wedding

Liz and Dick's Wedding

"I'm so happy you can't believe it,” beamed the newly married Taylor. “This marriage will last forever." Maybe not exactly, but it did prove to be Taylor’s greatest love affair. Liz and Dick’s marriage lasted 10 years; 16 months after their divorce, they married again, before finally divorcing a short time later, this time for good. 960 1280

Getty Images   

Smith College

Smith College

Elizabeth Taylor wowed the critics with her electrifying portrayal of Martha in 1966’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? The film was shot on location at Smith College in Northampton, MA, and earned Taylor her second Academy Award for Best Actress. 960 1280

cogito ergo imago, flickr   

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

In 1985, Taylor lost her longtime friend (and Giant costar) Rock Hudson to AIDS. That same year, Taylor cofounded the American Foundation for AIDS Research, and in 1986 went to Capitol Hill to testify before the Senate about the need for greater funding and public awareness of the disease. 960 1280

Thinkstock   

The Western Wall

The Western Wall

Taylor converted to Judaism at the age of 27, taking the name "Elisheba Rachel.” She went on to become a lifelong supporter of Israel, and visited the Western Wall in August 1975 with Richard Burton. Taylor returned to the country in 1982, meeting with Israeli leader Menachem Begin. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace

Paying homage to Taylor’s British roots, Buckingham Palace bestowed its highest honor on the star in 2000. That year, Taylor was named a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II. 960 1280

iStock   

Hawaii Shark Dive

Hawaii Shark Dive

At 74, Taylor proved she hadn’t lost her passion for life. Having survived a brain tumor nearly a decade earlier, Taylor enjoyed a shark-diving trip in Hawaii. "There were 12 sharks cruising the cage!" Taylor later told People. "The water was very warm. It was beautiful. I had a T-shirt on that said 'Shark Bait.'" 960 1280

Thinkstock  

The Abbey, Los Angeles

The Abbey, Los Angeles

In her final years, Taylor was a once-a-week regular at The Abbey, a gay bar in West Hollywood, CA. She’d enjoy tequila shots, watermelon and apple martinis, and wave to fans from her wheelchair. After her death, the bar staff left a remembrance to Taylor on an empty table: a Blue Velvet martini, made with vodka and blueberry schnapps, in a nod to Taylor’s 1944 film National Velvet. 960 1280

Getty Images   

Photos

Welcome to King's Landing!

Welcome to King's Landing!

King’s Landing, or as it’s known in real life, Dubrovnik, a Croatian city nested on the shore of the Adriatic Sea. Durbovnik’s stone walls, dramatic cliffs and amazing views make it the perfect seat for the king(s) of Westeros. 960 1280

Image Source / Getty Images  

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Duncan Muggoch, line producer for scenes shot in Spain and Croatia, says it is sometimes hard to film around tourists in Dubrovnik. Sherpas were used to help the production crew haul equipment through the narrow and often steep streets to specific locations throughout the city. Fans will see Croatia in the first few episodes of the fifth season. A soup kitchen scene with Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) visiting High Sparrow (Jonathan Pryce) was filmed in Dubrovnik. 960 1280

Macall B. Polay/courtesy HBO  

The Alcazar, Seville, Spain

The Alcazar, Seville, Spain

In Seville, the upper levels of the Alcazar are home to the royal family, but the palatial estate’s lush gardens are transformed into the Water Gardens of Dorne in the Game of Thrones’ fourth and fifth seasons. The Alcazar’s staircases are so narrow that the production crew had to use cranes to transport equipment up to a few of the palace’s balconies. More than 8,000 visitors converge on the Alcazar each day, making it one of the most-visited attractions in Seville. 960 1280

Macall B. Polay/courtesy HBO  

Plaza de Toros, Osuna, Spain

Plaza de Toros, Osuna, Spain

Located in southern Spain, the Plaza de Toros is an old bullring and national monument that was transformed into a gladiator arena for a scene in the fifth season of Game of Thrones. Producers picked the popular attraction because the arena’s stone structure is similar to those found in Croatia, another place where scenes were filmed for the medieval-era drama. 960 1280

Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images  

Magheramorne Quarry, County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Magheramorne Quarry, County Antrim, Northern Ireland

While 1 crew was shooting scenes in Spain and Croatia, a second production crew filmed scenes at the quarry in Magheramorne, which is located on the shores of Loch Larne. This small town of 75 residents was transformed into a fishing village called Hardhome. In previous Game of Thrones episodes, the location was also used to film scenes of Castle Black (first season) and the Battle of Blackwater (second season). 960 1280

Helen Sloan/courtesy HBO  

Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland’s Mourne Mountains provided the scenery for Dany’s entrance into the Dothraki holy land. Of course, the Dothraki fighting horse statues are missing, so you’ll just have to imagine the iconic gate when you visit these breathtaking mountains. 960 1280

Moment Open / Getty Images  

Doune Castle, Scotland

Doune Castle, Scotland

The Lord's Tower and East Wall of Doune Castle in Scotland should look familiar to Game of Thrones fans. Poor little Bran fell (was pushed) out one of its windows in the first season, when he saw something he shouldn’t have. Originally built in the 13th century, Doune Castle features a nature walk through the grounds for visitors. 960 1280

Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images  

The Dark Hedges, Northern Ireland

The Dark Hedges, Northern Ireland

The Dark Hedges in Northern Ireland have played a major role in the Game of Thrones story, serving as the setting for the Kingsroad. But the area that surrounds the Dark Hedges should be a must-see for any fan, since it has been used to film Winterfell, Castle Black and the Stark family war encampment. 960 1280

Moment Open / Getty Images  

Downhill Beach and Mussenden Temple, Northern Ireland

Downhill Beach and Mussenden Temple, Northern Ireland

If you happen to be rooting for Stannis Baratheon, Downhill Beach and Mussenden Temple in Northern Ireland are your spots. Serving as the backdrop for Dragonstone Castle and Blackwater Bay, Downhill Beach was where Melisandre burned the old gods, issuing a new religion for Stannis’ followers. 960 1280

Moment Open / Getty Images  

Essaouira, Morocco

Essaouira, Morocco

This historic bastion in Essaouira, Morocco, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It also happens to have played the part of Astapor, the slave-trading city where Daenerys freed the Unsullied, including everyone’s favorite: Grey Worm. 960 1280

E+ / Getty Images  

Ouarzazate, Morocco

Ouarzazate, Morocco

Ouarzazate, a town in Morocco, is famous for the Atlas Film Corporation Studios, open to tourists for tours of the many sets left from movies like Babel and Kingdom of Heaven. Sets at this Morrocco studio stood in for the Free City of Pentos, and also served as the venue for Dany and Khal Drogo’s memorable wedding. 960 1280

Photolibrary / Getty Images  

Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon, Iceland

Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon, Iceland

At the Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon in Iceland, the Vatnajokull Ice Cap -- Europe’s largest ice cap -- serves as the ideal setting for the Land Beyond the Wall. Just look out for White Walkers! 960 1280

Stone / Getty Images  

Skaftafell National Park, Iceland

Skaftafell National Park, Iceland

Skaftafell National Park in Iceland was the setting of Jon Snow and Ygritte’s love story, from Jon Snow and Qhorin Halfhand’s sneak attack on the Wildlings to the near beheading of our favorite red-head. The park is open year round for GoT devotees or visitors just looking for a glacier hike. 960 1280

E + / Getty Images