20 Things to Do in Atlanta

Six Flags Over Georgia, Turner Field, the SkyView Ferris wheel, Georgia Aquarium and Centennial Olympic Park are just a few reasons why you should visit the ATL.

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Enjoy the city lights of Atlanta's skyline at dusk. 960 1280

  

Art aficionados should make a trip to the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. 960 1280

  

Explore the Margaret Mitchell House, the home of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author who penned Gone With the Wind. 960 1280

  

Figures of Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis are carved into the bas-relief of Stone Mountain. 960 1280

  

Visit Turner Field to catch an Atlanta Braves baseball game. 960 1280

  

The Wren's Nest is the home of Joel Chandler Harris, author of the Brer Rabbit and Uncle Remus tales. 960 1280

  

World of Coca Cola

World of Coca Cola

One of Atlanta's main attractions, the World of Coca Cola attracts over a million visitors each year. Get a look at Coke bottles from around the world, learn about the soda’s secret formula, watch the bottling process, sample all of Coca-Cola’s products and check out the Pop Culture Gallery full of memorabilia. 960 1280

Allee Sangiolo  

Centennial Olympic Park

Centennial Olympic Park

Centennial Park was built for the 1996 Summer Olympics. It is now host to special events, including Family Fun Days. 960 1280

Allee Sangiolo  

Atlanta Aquarium

Atlanta Aquarium

The Georgia Aquarium is the largest aquarium in the world, and it has attracted more than 6 million visitors. 960 1280

Josh Hallett, flickr  

Atlanta Botanical Garden

Atlanta Botanical Garden

Atlanta Botanical Garden, a 30-acre garden in Midtown Atlanta. Get a look at the trees and plants from 40 feet in the air on the 600-foot-log Kendeda Canopy Walk. 960 1280

David Berkowitz, flickr  

Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970) was a guitarist and singer-songwriter. He has been called the greatest electric guitar player of all time. Learn more about him at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. 960 1280

Evening Standard/Getty Images  

Maya Angelou (born 1928) is a civil-rights activist, poet and autobiographer. Author of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Angelou was recently awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom. In October, 2010, 343 boxes of Angelou's correspondence, notes and personal papers were donated to the Schromberg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City, and will be available to the public some time in 2012. 960 1280

Kris Connor/Getty Images  

Louis Armstrong (1901-1971) was an American trumpet player and singer. He played a pivotal role in the development of jazz. Visit the Louis Armstrong House Museum in Queens, NY, to learn more. 960 1280

Central Press/Getty Images  

Civil-rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) remains the most iconic figure of the American civil-rights movement. He is known for his teachings of nonviolence, and a memorial to honor his life is currently under construction in Washington, DC. To learn more about Dr. King, visit the King Center in Atlanta, GA. 960 1280

William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images  

American boxer Muhammad Ali (born 1942) is considered one of the greatest heavyweight championship boxers of all time. Visit the Ali Center in Louisville, KY, to learn more about his remarkable life. 960 1280

R. McPhedran/Express/Getty Images  

A television personality and philanthropist, Oprah Winfrey (born 1954) has been called one of the most influential women in the world. On an episode of her show, she mentioned that she loved angel statuettes but couldn't find any black ones. Her viewers responded and mailed her so many, that she recently donated her collection to the Angel Museum in Beloit, WI. 960 1280

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images  

Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993), shown here with former President Lyndon Johnson, was the first African-American member of the Supreme Court. Visit the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, for a look at his personal notes and papers. 960 1280

Keystone/Getty Images  

Michael Jordan (born 1963) is considered one of the best basketball players of all time, and is credited with helping popularize the NBA around the world. Visit the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, MA, to learn more. 960 1280

Doug Pensinger/Allsports/Getty Images   

Rosa Parks (1913-2005) was an American civil-rights activist, famous for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, an important turning point in the civil-rights movement. Visit the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI, to get a look at the bus Parks rode. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Malcolm X (1925-1965) was an influential Muslim minister, autobiographer, and human-rights activist. Learn more about Malcolm X by visiting New York City's Memorial/Education Center at the Shabazz Center, the site of his assassination in 1965. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Aretha Franklin (born 1942) is a singer, songwriter and pianist who has been called one of the greatest singers of all time and is widely regarded as the Queen of Soul. Learn more at the new exhibit, Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power, opening in May at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. 960 1280

Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images  

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was a former slave who taught himself to read and write and became an author, orator and abolitionist. To learn more, take a tour of Cedar Hill, Douglass' home in Washington, DC. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images. Engraving by A.H. Ritchie  

Hank Aaron (born 1934) is considered one of the best baseball players of all time. In 1973 he broke Babe Ruth's home-run record. Visit Turner Field in Atlanta, GA, to see the fence that Aaron hit his 715th home run over. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Harriet Tubman (1822-1913) was an abolitionist famous for her many trips along the Underground Railroad. After escaping from slavery herself, she helped more than 70 others escape to freedom. Learn more about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, OH. 960 1280

National Portrait Gallery  

James Brown (1933-2005) was a singer and has been referred to as the Godfather of Soul. Visit the Augusta Museum of History in Augusta, GA, to learn more. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Miles Davis (1926-1991) was a composer, trumpeter and key figure in the history of jazz. You can pay your respects at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York City. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Ray Charles (1930-2004) has been called one of the greatest artists of all time. He was one of the first African-American musicians to be given artistic control by a mainstream record company and is often called the pioneer of soul music. To learn more, visit the Ray Charles Memorial Library in Los Angeles, CA, when it opens to the public in 2011. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Jackie Robinson (1919-1972) was the American baseball player who broke the 'color line' in baseball when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Learn more about Jackie Robinson at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, located in Cooperstown, NY. 960 1280

Curt Gunther/Keystone/Getty Images  

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was born into slavery but escaped to become an abolitionist, women's-rights activist and orator. Visit Florence, MA, to see her memorial. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

BEIJING 2008

BEIJING 2008

Michael Phelps of the United States competes in the men's 200-meter butterfly final at the National Aquatics Centre during day 5 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. Phelps finished the race in 1.52.03 -- a new world record.  960 1280

Adam Pretty/Getty Images  

ATHENS 2004

ATHENS 2004

Pyrros Dimas of Greece jumps in the air as he celebrates a successful lift in the men's 85 kg category weightlifting competition during the Athens 2004 Summer Olympic Games at Nikaia Olympic Weightlifting Hall. 960 1280

Al Bello/Getty Images  

SYDNEY 2000

SYDNEY 2000

Xuan Liu of China in action at the women's gymnastics beam final in the Sydney Superdome on day 10 of the 2000 Olympic Games.   960 1280

Ezra Shaw /Allsport   

ATLANTA 1996

ATLANTA 1996

Igor Potapovich of Kazakhstan soars through the flame-lit sky to clear the bar and claim fourth in the pole vault at the Centennial Olympic Games in Atlanta.  960 1280

Mike Hewitt /Allsport /Getty Images  

BARCELONA 1992

BARCELONA 1992

Michael Jordon, Scottie Pippen and Clyde Drexler receive their gold medals as members of the US basketball "dream team" during the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona. 960 1280

Mike Powell/Getty Images  

SEOUL 1988

SEOUL 1988

Greg Louganis of the U.S. diving team sets himself for a dive in the springboard event at the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, where he won the gold with a score of 730.80 points. 960 1280

Getty Images  

LOS ANGELES 1984

LOS ANGELES 1984

Carl Lewis of the U.S. receives the baton from teammate Calvin Smith as he brings the team to victory with a new world-record time of 37.83 seconds in the 4x100-meter relay during the 1984 Olympic Games at the Coliseum Stadium in Los Angeles.  960 1280

Tony Duffy/Getty Images   

MOSCOW 1980

MOSCOW 1980

Maria Caridad-Colon of Cuba in action during the women's javelin event of the 1980 Olympic Games at the Lenin Stadium in Moscow. Caridad-Colon won the event with a distance of 68.40 meters. 960 1280

Tony Duffy/Allsport   

MONTREAL 1976

MONTREAL 1976

Bruce Jenner of the U.S. celebrates during his record-setting performance in the decathlon at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.  960 1280

Tony Duffy/Allsport/Getty  

MUNICH 1972

MUNICH 1972

Competitors rise out of the blocks at the start of the men's 200 meter final at the Olympiastadion in Munich.  960 1280

Tony Duffy/Allsport/Getty  

MEXICO CITY 1968

MEXICO CITY 1968

At the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos performed their Black Power salute, a human rights protest and one of the most overtly-political statements in the 110-year history of the modern Olympic Games. 960 1280

Universal History Archive/Getty Images  

TOKYO 1964

TOKYO 1964

The start of the 100-meter butterfly swimming race at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. 960 1280

Keystone/Getty Images  

ROME 1960

ROME 1960

Abebe Bikila of Ethiopia, running barefoot, draws away from Abdesselem Rhadi of Morocco near the finish of the marathon at the 1960 Rome Olympics. He went on to win with a new Olympic record time of 2 hours, 15 minutes and 16 seconds.  960 1280

Getty Images  

MELBOURNE 1956

MELBOURNE 1956

Chris Brasher of Great Britain during the steeplechase final event at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. 960 1280

Getty Images  

HELSINKI 1952

HELSINKI 1952

Nina (Romashkova) Ponomaryova of modern day Russia, represented the Soviet Union. Here, she throws the discus at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics. She won the Soveit Union's first Olympic medal and set a new Olympic record. 960 1280

Getty Images  

LONDON 1948

LONDON 1948

Danish competitor Major N Mikkelsen fails to win the jumping test event as his horse demolishes a fence at the 1948 Olympics in London. 960 1280

Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

BERLIN 1936

BERLIN 1936

American athlete Jesse Owens runs at the 1936 Olympic Games in Germany, where he won four gold medals. Behind him, an athlete wears a swastika on his vest. 960 1280

Central Press/Getty Images  

LOS ANGELES 1932

LOS ANGELES 1932

Thomas Hampson of Great Britain breaks the tape ahead of Alexander Wilson of Canada to win gold and set a new world record at the Los Angeles Olympics in 1932. 960 1280

Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

AMSTERDAM 1928

AMSTERDAM 1928

The Chilean goalkeeper fails to prevent Portugal from winning at the Amsterdam Olympics in 1928. 960 1280

Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

PARIS 1924

PARIS 1924

Preliminary rounds in the water polo competition take place in the pool at Piscine des Tourelles during the Paris Olympics in 1924. 960 1280

Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

ANTWERP 1920

ANTWERP 1920

Suzanne Lenglen of France competes in the women’s tennis event during the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium. 960 1280

Getty Images  

STOCKHOLM 1912

STOCKHOLM 1912

The opening ceremonies of the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. 960 1280

Getty Images  

LONDON 1908

LONDON 1908

Women archers participate at the 1908 London Olympics. 960 1280

Topical Press Agency/Getty Images  

ST. LOUIS 1904

ST. LOUIS 1904

The 100-meter freestyle race, which was won by Hungarian swimmer Zoltan Halmay at the 1904 Games in St. Louis. 960 1280

Popperfoto/Getty Images  

PARIS 1900

PARIS 1900

The tug-of-war was a controversial affair, with a combined Sweden/Denmark team beating France in the 1900 Paris Olympics. 960 1280

Getty Images  

ATHENS 1896

ATHENS 1896

The start of the 100-meter sprint at the first Olympic Games of the modern era in 1896 in Athens. 960 1280

Getty Images  

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