Take Your Best Shot: Hawaii

From a Waikiki rainbow to a wedding on Waimanalo Beach, here are some of our favorite Hawaii shots from the Travel Channel community.

Photos

Welcome to Wanderlust O'ahu. Yogis take their practice to the crystal clear Hawaiian ocean for standup paddleboard yoga – the ultimate test of balance. Hawaii was the birthplace for standup paddleboarding, after all, so it's no surprise SUP yoga has taken off here, too. 960 1280

Mike Bernard  

Low lunges meet tall palm trees during yogi, surfer and “blissologist” Eoin Finn’s class at Wanderlust O’ahu. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Wanderlust O’ahu pays homage to Hawaiian culture with classes in the art of carving traditional wood surfboards with Hawaii native Tom Pohaku Stone. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Today’s hottest musical acts like ALO rock the outdoor stage at Wanderlust O’ahu. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Wanderlust festival is the largest multi-day yoga event in the world, with annual events in Squaw Valley, CA, Stratton Mountain, VT, Copper Mountain, CO, and Whistler, British Columbia. In 2013, it has expanded to Chile and O’ahu. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

The infectious beats of musician Michael Franti leads to a spontaneous dance party during Shiva Rea’s “trance dance.” 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Tutu Janet teaches Wanderlust-ers how to play Hawaii’s favorite musical instrument -- the ukulele! 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

In between yoga classes, yogis soak up the Hawaiian sunshine on O'ahu's North Shore. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Wanderlust O’ahu showcases the best of Hawaiian culture -- like these fire dancers from Soul Fire Productions heating up the stage. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Michael Franti, no stranger to the stage at Wanderlust, brings the crowd to new heights with his catchy beats. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Turtle Bay Resort, which hosted this year’s Wanderlust O’ahu, is a 880-acre paradise that sits on the northernmost tip of the North Shore with 5 miles of remote beachfront. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Dancing in the sun on Hawaii's fabled North Shore in your comfy yoga pants? Pure happiness. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Michael Franti leaves the stage to dance with the crowd in his sold-out performance. 960 1280

  

Female surf legend Rochelle Ballard discusses the synchronicity of surfing and yoga during her speakeasy at Surfer, The Bar. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

LYFE Kitchen showcases their new healthy fare with free tastings. Look for the health-conscious food line in supermarkets near you soon. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Yoga meets tightrope for a true balance challenge -- slackline yoga. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Forget your mat -- practice yoga right on the grass at Wanderlust. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Standup paddleboard yoga lets you soak in the sunshine (and take a dip to cool off) while you practice your down dogs. 960 1280

Kathleen Rellihan   

Yogis take to the waves for surf lessons on O'ahu's North Shore, where big wave surfing was born. Luckily, there are smaller waves in spots for beginners, too. 960 1280

Ali Kaukas  

Take a 4-wheel drive about a half an hour north of Lanai City and you will discover Kaiolohia, also known as Shipwreck beach. This windy 8-mile stretch of beach has broken many a ship with its shallow, rocky channel, including a 1940s tanker that lay rusting as a ghostly reminder to mariners to stay away. The rough water also makes for poor swimming, but the views of Molokai and Maui and wide stretch of open sand make this a great place for beachcombing. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Shark's Cove

Shark's Cove

Shark's Cove is not a good place to swim, but you’d be hard pressed to find a beach that is more visually stunning. Iron-rich rocks give the cliffs a deep, red color that contrasts sharply with the turquoise water. The area has strong currents, so we recommend picnics, hikes and sunbathing instead. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Before you head out to snorkel at Hulopoe Beach Park and Marine Preserve, pick up a laminated fish guide at one of the local stores, then get ready for your own version of show and tell. The bay is rich with fish, from striped Moorish idols to our state fish the humuhumunukunukuapuaa. (Try to say that three times.) Once in a while, a friendly green sea turtle might even stop on by to say hello. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

For most of the year, Hulopoe Bay, which fronts the Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay, is the best place for kayaking, swimming and snorkeling on the island. Rent a kayak or bring your own and soon you'll find yourself torn between paddling and stopping to take photos. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Kaholo Cliffs

Kaholo Cliffs

The sea cliffs of Lanai rise nearly a thousand feet above the Pacific. Visitors can travel along the network of four wheel drive roads that traverse the island and enjoy incredible views all along the rocky coast. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Koele Lookout in Lanai

Koele Lookout in Lanai

A horseback ride is the most adventurous way to access the magnificent views of mountains, valleys, and seascapes that can be enjoyed from Koele Lookout. Koele itself has its own unrivalled landscape, symbolized by its towering Cook Island pines. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

mountains and Mouflon sheep

mountains and Mouflon sheep

The mountains and remote valleys of Lanai are home to a remarkable variety of wildlife including wild turkey, quail, pheasant, Axis deer, and Mouflon sheep. The deer and sheep can often be found on the sheer cliffs of the island’s high country. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

petroglyphs in Lanai

petroglyphs in Lanai

Hawaiians came to Lanai as early as the 15th Century and left evidence of their existence in rock carvings called petroglyphs. If you like scavenger hunts, Luahiwa Petroglyphs are a challenge to find, but for the determined traveler, they offer a fascinating glimpse into the island’s past. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Pueo

Pueo

The sunlit sky above Lanai is home to the Pueo, or Hawaiian short-eared owl. In the absence of streetlights and neon, Lanai’s crystalline night sky is also home to a galaxy of stars, invisible to most of the outside world. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

There are only three ways to get onto the Kalaupapa National Historic Park on the Kalaupapa Peninsula: by mule ride, a hiking tour or a small commuter airplane. This scenic area was once home to Belgian missionary Saint Damien, the selfless priest who devoted his life to caring for exiled victims of Hansen disease. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

As you look toward the north coast of Molokai, you can see the Kalaupapa Peninsula in the distance. The peninsula is isolated by towering cliffs that stand up to 3,600 feet high and are the tallest sea cliffs in the world. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Hike into Molokai's East End's classic cathedral valley to see Hawaii back in time. It's believed that ancient Polynesians settled in the lush Halawa Valley as early as 650 A.D. Roughly two miles up the trail is the impressive double-tiered 250-foot Mooula Falls. The one and a half hour drive to the valley from the airport is an adventure in itself, with ancient fishponds, Kumimi Beach and Kaluaaha Church along the way. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Only 38 miles long and 10 miles wide, Molokai has more than enough land to explore by foot, bike or car. Follow the roads along Molokai's rugged coastline and you'll see far more birds than cars, and probably even less people. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Western Molokai features some of Hawaii's largest and least visited beaches. Papohaku Beach Park is three miles long and one mile wide, a perfect crescent of shimmering sand. Kapukahelu Beach is a small sheltered cove. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

From the Kalaupapa Peninsula, the North Coast of Molokai presents a stunning vista. 10 years ago we would have reminded you to bring enough film to capture all the gorgeous scenery. Now it's memory cards, which seems a little ironic considering Molokai is the kind of place that makes you happy to escape your electronics. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Kepuhi Point

Kepuhi Point

On Kepuhi Point off Papohaku Beach you can occasionally catch a wave in front of the Kaluakoi Resort. Although Molokai isn’t known for surfing, you’d be surprised how good it can get. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

Avid and novice cyclists alike will enjoy Molokai's lack of traffic. From one end of the island to the other, just follow the roads. But don't look for a convenience store on any corner, because we're proud to say there aren't any. So, bring water, snacks, and a supply of sunscreen to protect your ear-to-ear grin. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

It's quiet as you ride on your mule along the 2.9-mile trail to Kalaupapa Peninsula. You'd be speechless too if you were descending from 1,700 feet with steep drops and the Pacific before you. Three miles, 26 switchbacks and 90 minutes of magnificent views later and you're back to sea level in the historic town of Kalaupapa. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands  

As you approach the Halawa Valley, Halawa Beach offers a secluded bay that is great for swimming. However exercise caution during high surf and winter months. If you think it looks picture perfect, that's because it is. 960 1280

The Hawaiian Islands