Taste of New Orleans

Channel your inner Cajun and get a taste of New Orleans. From po'boys to muffuletta, we've picked out photos of some of Louisiana's most mouthwatering dishes.

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Photos

Café du Monde

Café du Monde

Enjoy powdery beignets and a café au lait at Café du Monde. This coffee shop has been a fixture of New Orleans’ French Quarter since 1862 and is open 24 hours a day ... leaving lots of time for seconds. 960 1280

iStock  

Chiba

Chiba

Get your chopsticks ready for a sushi break at Chiba. The Japanese restaurant comes with a New Orleans twist, with dishes like this satsuma-strawberry roll – a yellowtail, mango and jalapeno combo rolled up with scallops, then topped with strawberries and satsuma sauce, made from the citrus native to the Big Easy. 960 1280

Cheryl Gerber  

Luke Restaurant

Luke Restaurant

Orleans' Franco-German brasseries of old, with dishes ranging from Jagerschnitzel (breadcrumb-coated pork) to moules et frites (steamed mussels with fries).
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Vxla, Flickr  

Kingfish

Kingfish

If bacon’s your thing, you’ll want to try this bacon-wrapped stuffed jalapeno dish at Kingfish. A newcomer on the French Quarter dining scene, this restaurant-cocktail bar is named after Huey P. Long, the colorful Louisiana governor known as The Kingfish in his day. 
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Creole Cuisine Restaurant Concepts  

Mother’s Restaurant

Mother’s Restaurant

This seafood gumbo dish keeps diners flocking to Mother’s Restaurant. Located in New Orleans’ Central Business District, the dining spot has been in business since 1938 and boasts the "world's best baked ham." We’re told they make some pretty good po’ boys, too. 960 1280

Mother’s Restaurant  

Commander’s Palace

Commander’s Palace

Arguably the most famous restaurant in New Orleans, Commander’s Palace has been in business since 1880. Today this landmark New Orleans dining establishment, which entertained the likes of Mark Twain in its heyday, mixes old-time Creole favorites such as Louisiana Gulf shrimp, with newer fare like Jamaican jerked cabrito empanadas. 960 1280

Commander’s Palace  

Upperline Restaurant

Upperline Restaurant

You know you’re in for a treat when the lead chef of a restaurant owns over 1,000 cookbooks. Under the culinary talents of New Orleans native Dave Bridges, Upperline serves up traditional Creole and contemporary cuisine, like this juicy plate of sauteed Gulf fish meunière. 960 1280

Upperline Restaurant  

Cochon

Cochon

You’ll have a hard time controlling yourself once this cast-iron skillet comes to your table. Pork hock is among the savory dishes you’ll find at Cochon, which Bon Appetit has named one of the “20 most important restaurants in America.” We just call this Cajun and Southern cooking spot "yum." 960 1280

Chris Granger  

Dominique's

Dominique's

The chef behind this restaurant has an incredible story to tell: Born on the island of Mauritius, Dominique Macquet grew up with Asian, Creole, African and Indian culinary influences. As a chef, he went on to cook Nelson Mandela’s first meal outside a South African prison. That wide-ranging, and passionate love of, cuisine finds a place at Dominique’s. 960 1280

Dominique's on Magazine  

Napoleon House

Napoleon House

Sink your teeth into this hot muffuletta at Napoleon House. This French Quarter restaurant also serves up traditional New Orleans dishes like gumbo, red beans and rice, and jambalaya. Wash it down with a Pimm’s Cup, heralded by these guys as “the perfect beverage to complete your experience at the Napoleon House.” 960 1280

Charles E. Martin, Flickr, CC-BY-NC-SA-2.0  

Cafe Degas

Cafe Degas

No, it’s not Miami. You’re looking at the long-running and “most Gallic” French bistro in New Orleans, according to its owners, whom we have every reason to believe. Try Café Degas’ famous French onion soup (topped with croutons and melted Swiss), jumbo lump crab meat and so much more. 960 1280

Cafe Degas  

Galatoire’s

Galatoire’s

Back in 1896 an immigrant named Jean Galatoire left a village near Pau, France, and settled in New Orleans. He went on to purchase Victor’s Restaurant on Canal Street, rename it … and the rest is history. Heralded by the James Beard Foundation as an "outstanding restaurant," Galatoire’s serves up dishes like this mouthwatering pompano fish with crabmeat. 960 1280

Galatoire’s  

Acme Oyster House

Acme Oyster House

Another historic (and must-try) restaurant in New Orleans is Acme Oyster House. Since opening its doors in 1910, this French Quarter spot has gone on to become the Big Easy’s most famous oyster house. Pull up a seat and enjoy dishes like raw oysters, naturally, and this succulent plate of seafood etouffee. 960 1280

Acme Oyster House   

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar

It’s not just the menu that draws diners to Superior Seafood and Oyster Bar, it’s the views. Kick back courtesy of patio seating, and enjoy a front-row view of the St. Charles Avenue streetcar in historic Uptown New Orleans, just beyond. And the menu? With Louisiana seafood and Creole dishes, chances are you’ll like them, too. 960 1280

Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar  

12 Photos
Odell Brewing Co.

Odell Brewing Co.

Stop by Odell Brewing Co. for a taste of some of their experimental beers, cooked up in small batches at the brewery in Fort Collins, CO. Take a tour to learn all about craft brew culture. 960 1280

Odell Brewing Co.  

Troegs Brewing

Troegs Brewing

Get a glimpse of the entire brewing process at Troegs Brewing Company in Harrisburg, PA. Start off with free samples in the tasting room, then move through the brewhouse where you'll learn all about fermentation and filtration. Tours are offered every Saturday; reservations are recommended. 960 1280

Clff1066 through Flickr Creative Commons  

Harpoon

Harpoon

On your next trip to Boston, stop by Harpoon Brewery. Narrated beer tastings are offered during the week, and full tours of the brewery are conducted on weekends. Tours are $5, and include a souvenir glass and beer tasting. 960 1280

Aaron Gustafson through Flickr Creative Commons  

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Free tours of Brooklyn Brewery are conducted each weekend. For an even more informative experience, plan ahead and book one of the reservation-only weeknight tours. They cost $8, are limited to 25 people and include a free tasting. 960 1280

Kevin Gessner through Flickr Creative Commons  

Dogfish Head

Dogfish Head

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the brewhouse, cellars and packaging hall at Dogfish Head Brewery in Milton, DE. Make sure to try a few of the free samples as well. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, beer enthusiasts can also tour the Dogfish Head pub in Rehoboth Beach, DE, site of the company's experimental brewery. 960 1280

Bernt Rostad through Flickr Creative Commons  

Sierra Nevada

Sierra Nevada

Visit the Sierra Nevada Brewing Company in Chico, CA, for one of the daily guided tours. Stop by the taproom and restaurant for a taste (or 2) of their award-winning brews. 960 1280

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.  

Smuttynose

Smuttynose

Smuttynose Brewing in the seaport town of Portsmouth, NH, offers tours on Fridays and Saturdays. Also be sure to visit the Portsmouth Brewery, New Hampshire's original brewpub. 960 1280

Robert Lussier Photography  

Sam Adams

Sam Adams

Learn all about the history of Samuel Adams Brewery on an hour-long tour of the Boston facility. The comprehensive tours are offered daily, and include a beer tasting. 960 1280

The Boston Beer Company  

Coors

Coors

Visit the Coors brewery in Golden, CO, for a tour of the largest single-site brewery in the world. At the end of the tour, visitors can take a look at the collection of historical beer cans, bottles and memorabilia, and sample some of the Coors products. 960 1280

Eli Duke through Flickr Creative Commons  

Anchor Brewing Company

Anchor Brewing Company

Anchor Brewing Company in San Francisco takes great pride in its traditional methods of beer production. Tours are offered daily, but make sure to make a reservation before visiting. 960 1280

Bernt Rostad through Flickr Creative Commons  

Abita

Abita

Visit Abita Springs, LA, for a free tour of Abita Brewery. Visitors are given a cup to pour their own samples from the taps in the tasting room both before and after the tour. 960 1280

Infrogmation of New Orleans through Flickr Creative Commons  

Anheuser-Busch Brewery

Anheuser-Busch Brewery

Free tours of the Anheuser-Busch Brewery in St. Louis are conducted daily. For a more comprehensive behind-the-scenes experience, schedule a $25 Beermaster Tour. 960 1280

Chris Yunker through Flickr Creative Commons  

A cook stirs up some Thai food in Bangkok. 960 1280

  

In Rome, you're never far away from a great glass of wine and a plate of pasta. 960 1280

  

Café and a croissant: a delicious Paris combo. 960 1280

  

In Chicago, a saucy deep-dish pizza. 960 1280

  

Some of the best wines in the world hail from California's Napa Valley. 960 1280

  

In Tokyo, sushi is a form of art. 960 1280

  

From po'boys to muffulettas, New Orleans is home to some of the earth's best sandwiches. 960 1280

  

The shrimp cocktail is a staple of Las Vegas cuisine. 960 1280

  

Some say San Francisco is the best food city in the US. 960 1280

  

Some New Yorkers say there's no argument. The Big Apple is the country's food mecca. 960 1280