Daily Escape

thors hammer, bryce canyon, national park, sunset

Photo by National Park Service

Thor's Hammer

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Resembling a forest made of stone, the spectacular landscape of Bryce Canyon seems extraterrestrial. Made up of countless hoodoos, the park and its odd-shaped pillars of rock (the result of erosion) captivate visitors -- but none more so than Thor’s Hammer. Take a moonlight hike with a park ranger, explore the terrain on horseback, or plan your visit to coordinate with the full moon for an evening hike that’s truly out of this world.


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Garden of Eden, Arches National Park
Garden of Eden, Arches National Park

Garden of Eden, Arches National Park

Near the center of Arches National Park you’ll find the Garden of Eden -- so named because its rocky shapes resemble flowers and trees. 960 1280

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North Window, Arches National Park

North Window, Arches National Park

This 90-foot-wide portal known as the North Window is one of many natural sandstone arches you’ll find at Arches National Park. 960 1280

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Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

Arches National Park is home to more than 2,000 natural sandstone arches. The 65-foot Delicate Arch is its most famous. 960 1280

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Arches National Park

Arches National Park

In addition to its famed arches, Arches National Park’s colorful geography includes maze-like narrow passages and tall rock columns. You can find this view directly opposite the Delicate Arch. 960 1280

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Hiking at Arches

Hiking at Arches

Two hikers journey back from the Delicate Arch. The 3-mile trail (round-trip) is moderately strenuous, and takes roughly 30 to 45 minutes each way. Bring plenty of water! 960 1280

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Sand Dune Arch

Sand Dune Arch

Enjoy a shaded rest from the Moab desert sun. This trail at Arches National Park leads through deep sand; a secluded arch, Sand Dune Arch, awaits up ahead. 960 1280

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Wolfe Ranch Cabin

Wolfe Ranch Cabin

In the late 1800s, a Civil War veteran named John Wesley Wolfe and his son built this 1-room cabin in what is now Arches National Park. For more than 10 years, Wolfe lived on this rugged ranch, where the area’s water and desert grassland were enough to sustain a few cattle. 960 1280

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Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park

Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park

The Moab area is also home to Canyonlands National Park. Erosion over millions of years produced the many canyons, buttes and mesas here -- including Mesa Arch. 960 1280

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Hell’s Revenge

Hell’s Revenge

Ready to take on Hell’s Revenge? This steep slick rock trail may make your pulse race as you tackle its hair-raising descents on a Razor ride. It’s located in the Sand Flats Recreation Area, a sandstone plateau of slick rock domes, bowls and fins. 960 1280

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Porcupine Rim Trail

Porcupine Rim Trail

A mountain biker tackles Porcupine Rim Trail, one of 2 trails within the Sand Flats Recreation Area. The steep, rocky terrain, which stretches nearly 15 miles, challenges even the most experienced mountain bikers. 960 1280

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Moab Cowboy

Moab Cowboy

Meet the Moab Cowboy -- that's what locals call Kent Green. For more than 20 years, Green served as a deputy sheriff and search-and-rescue commander in the Moab area. Today, he leads off-road adventures. His no. 1 rule: Never travel alone. 960 1280

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Moab Dinosaur Footprints

Moab Dinosaur Footprints

Check out these fossilized dinosaur footprints during a Razor ride through the Sand Flats Recreation Area with the Moab Cowboy. 960 1280

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Big Bend Recreation Area

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Colorado River

Colorado River

Take in the view of the Colorado River from Scenic Byway 128, with awe-inspiring views of red standstone cliffs just beyond. 960 1280

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Fisher Towers, Colorado River

River guide Arne Hultquist leads a whitewater rafting trip through the Fishers Tower section of the Colorado River. The area comprises a series of towers made of sandstone; they’re named after a miner who lived in the area in the 1880s. 960 1280

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Matrimony Spring

Matrimony Spring

Fill up at Matrimony Spring, a natural spring along Byway 128. Legend has it that anyone who drinks from the spring will continue to return to Moab. The water that issues forth begins its journey as snowmelt from the La Sal Mountains, 20 miles southeast of Moab. 960 1280

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Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point

Get ready to say “wow” at Dead Horse Point. The park features a stunning overlook of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park. The area also served as the final film scene for the 1991 classic Thelma & Louise. 960 1280

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Grand Canyon
Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon

Considered one of the 7 Natural Wonders of the World, the Grand Canyon is 277 miles long and up to 18 miles long. The steep canyon -- managed by Grand Canyon National Park, the Hualapai Tribal Nation and the Havasupai Tribe -- was carved over millions of years by the Colorado River in Arizona. 960 1280

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Cathedral Rock, Sedona, Arizona

Cathedral Rock, Sedona, Arizona

One of the most-photographed sights in Arizona, Cathedral Rock is a must-see stop if you’re taking an RV road trip through America’s Southwest. We recommend visiting Red Rock Crossing at Oak Creek in Sedona for the best view of this amazing rock formation. 960 1280

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Havasu Falls

Havasu Falls

Take a dip in the natural pools at Havasu Falls, a well-renowned double waterfall in the Grand Canyon located more than a mile from Supai, AZ. After a swim, eat lunch at the picnic area located near Havasu Creek. 960 1280

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Bright Angel Trail

Bright Angel Trail

Go hiking! Bright Angel Trail is the safest trail in Grand Canyon National Park. Hikers can camp out at Indian Garden and Bright Angel Campground. This hiking trail has portable drinking water at the 2 campsites, Three-Mile Resthouse and Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse. And if hikers should ever need them, a ranger presence and emergency phones are located along the trail. 960 1280

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Grand Canyon Railroad Depot

Grand Canyon Railroad Depot

Hop on a train to explore Grand Canyon National Park’s natural beauty. Take a step back in time as authentic characters and musicians bring the Old West to life on a Grand Canyon Railway train ride. Constructed between 1909 and 1910, the Grand Canyon Depot (pictured) was designed by American architect Francis W. Wilson. It is one of 14 log depots constructed in the US. 960 1280

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North Rim

North Rim

Begin your grand journey here! The North Rim, located 30 miles south of Jacob Lake on Highway 67, is the entrance to Grand Canyon National Park. We recommend guests plan ahead. Visitor lodging, food services and the road from Jacob Lake to the North Rim are open from mid-May to mid-October. 960 1280

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North Kaibab Trail

North Kaibab Trail

A parking area is located on State Route 67, about a mile north of the North Rim’s Grand Canyon Lodge, for visitors to start their hike on 3 different trails, including the Ken Patrick Trail and the Uncle Jim Trail. The North Kaibab Trail (pictured) is also accessible from the parking area. This trail begins at the head of Roaring Springs Canyon and ends at the Colorado River. 960 1280

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Grand Canyon Camper Village

Grand Canyon Camper Village

Looking for the best spot to camp in the Grand Canyon? Head to Grand Canyon Camper Village, located a mile south of the park entrance on Highway 64 in Tusayan, AZ. This campground offers a convenient camping location for RVs, trailers and tents. The campground also has an IMAX theater, general store, restaurants, shopping and park shuttle stops all within walking distance. 960 1280

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Colorado River Rafting

Colorado River Rafting

Set your course for adventure on a white-water rafting trip down the Colorado River. Thrill-seekers have their pick of various commercial to non-commercial river trips that range from a half-day to a 25-day trip. Experience the scenic wonder and adrenaline rush on this adventure of a lifetime. 960 1280

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Navajo Nation

Navajo Nation

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Bell Rock

Bell Rock

Some Western spiritual writers with a New Age focus believe this popular tourist attraction is a portal into the Earth or a gateway to other dimensions. Add Bell Rock to your must-see list. It’s located north of the Village of Oak Creek, AZ, and south of Sedona. 960 1280

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Grand Canyon Skywalk

Grand Canyon Skywalk

Get awe-inspiring views from the Grand Canyon Skywalk, owned by the Hualapai Indian tribe. The transparent-horseshoe bridge operates like a conveyor belt, providing tourists with great vantage points to gaze at the majestic canyon from 4,770 feet above the Colorado River. 960 1280

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Rim Trail

Rim Trail

Plan a day of hiking on the Rim Trail, located on the North/South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. Hikers can start their trek from any viewpoint in Grand Canyon Village or along Hermit Road. The trail stretches 13 miles from South Kaibab Trailhead west to Hermit’s Rest. Make sure you pack water before you start this hiking trail. Water is available at the beginning and end of the trail. 960 1280

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