Papohaku Beach Park
Punaluu Black Sand Beach

Punaluu Black Sand Beach

Take a stroll along one of Hawaii’s most famous black-sand beaches. Located south of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Punaluu Black Sand Beach is home to large honu, or green sea turtles. Don’t get too close: Beachgoers are forbidden to touch these protected turtles or leave the beach with black sand as a souvenir. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Mauna Kea

Mauna Kea

At 33,100 feet from the ocean floor, the peak of Mauna Kea — Hawaiian for “white mountain” — is the highest point on Hawaii. Measuring base to peak, the dormant volcano is twice the size of Mount Everest, making it the tallest mountain in the world. The peak is sacred, according to Hawaiian mythology, and ancient law said that only high-ranking tribal chiefs were allowed to visit the top. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Kirk Lee Aeder  

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Be an eyewitness to nature at its hottest by exploring the 333,000-acre Volcanoes National Park. This popular park features more than 150 miles of trails through volcanic craters, petroglyphs and a walk-in lava tube, and it is home to 2 active volcanoes: Mauna Loa and Kilauea. Often referred to as a “drive-in” volcano, Kilauea spews 250,000 to 650,000 cubic yards of lava each day. 960 1280

Big Island Visitors Bureau/ Ethan Tweedie  

Puu Pehe

Puu Pehe

Staying at the Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay? Then don’t miss taking a short hike to see Puu Pehe, aka Sweetheart Rock. According to legend, Makakehau, a young warrior, brought his lover, Hawaiian maiden Pehe, from Lahaina to hide her in a sea cave near Manele Bay’s cliffs. Pehe drowned, and, stricken with grief, the warrior plunged to his death from the 80-foot summit. See the setting of the lovers’ tale, and you may even spot a spinner dolphin along the way. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Na Pali Coast

Na Pali Coast

You can’t leave the Hawaiian Islands without seeing the majestic landscape of the 17-mile, mountainous coastline along Kauai’s North Shore. The Na Pali Coast is the location for hikers, beach campers and kayakers. Avoid hiking in the winter, when trails become muddy from heavy rainfall, making it treacherous, especially for amateurs. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Hanauma Bay

Hanauma Bay

Located on the southeast coast of Oahu, Hanauma Bay is a popular destination for snorkeling. This pristine coastline has attracted as many as 3 million visitors in a year. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Heather Titus  

Rainbow Falls

Rainbow Falls

Rainbow (or Waianuenue) Falls flows 80 feet down on a lava cave, which, according to Hawaiian mythology, is the home of the goddess Hina. Look closely near the bottom, and you may see rainbows form in the waterfall’s mist. What’s the best way to get there? Park officials advise tourists to make their way to this natural wonder by following clearly marked access roads to Wailuku River State Park. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Haleakala

Haleakala

More than 75% of Maui was formed by Haleakala, a shield volcano located on the southeast side of the island. Puu Ulaula, or Red Hill, is more than 10,000 feet tall, making it the volcano’s tallest peak. Go hiking in the 30,000-acre Haleakala National Park and experience various landscapes, from tropical forests to unique desert terrain. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Diamond Head

Diamond Head

Head to Oahu to hike one of Hawaii’s most famous landmarks, Diamond Head State Monument. Used as a military lookout through the 20th century, this natural wonder is now a popular hiking destination. Diamond Head offers awe-inspiring views of Waikiki and Honolulu. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Waimea Canyon

Waimea Canyon

Waimea is Hawaiian for “reddish water.” Located on the west side of Kauai, this canyon — which stretches 14 miles long, 1 mile wide and 3,600 feet deep — has reddish soil that is traversed by dozens of hiking trails. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Road to Hana

Road to Hana

Take a road trip and hit the famous Hana Highway, a 52-mile stretch with 620 curves and 59 bridges. The road starts at Kahului and ends in Hana, but we recommend spending some extra time on the drive to take in the sights, including lush rain forests and dramatic waterfalls. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Wailua Falls

Wailua Falls

Mr. Roarke wasn’t the real star in the opening credits of the late-’70s TV show Fantasy Island. The real star was Kauai’s Wailua Falls, but don’t blink, because you might miss its cameo. This waterfall is located on the south end of the Wailua River and north of Lihue. The best views are from the road. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Papohaku Beach Park

Papohaku Beach Park

Known as Three Mile Beach, Molokai’s Papohaku Beach Park is one of Hawaii’s largest white-sand beaches. This natural wonder isn’t just for sunbathing; campers also converge on the quiet beach. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Dana Edmunds  

Akaka Falls

Akaka Falls

Visit the Big Island’s Akaka Falls State Park, where you can see 2 amazing waterfalls: the 100-foot Kahuna Falls and the 442-foot Akaka Falls (pictured). The latter is Hawaii’s most famous waterfall. Take a hike, and you’ll arrive at this natural wonder in less than an hour. 960 1280

Hawaii Tourism Authority/ Tor Johnson  

Chicago

Chicago

In addition to deep-dish pizza slices bigger than your face, Windy City must-dos include cruising on a riverboat architectural tour, taking a "Bean" selfie at Millenium Park and catching an improv comedy show at Second City. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Photographer's Choice / Getty Images  

Las Vegas

Las Vegas

Make your 72 hours in Sin City count with pool parties, incredible shows and the infamous casinos on the strip. Venture out to the Neon Museum and tour the sign graveyard if you love vintage Americana. Skip the crowds in front of the Bellagio by staying at the Cosmo. Most of their balcony rooms overlook the famous fountains and the view makes an incredible Instagram. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Sylvain Sonnet / Photolibrary / Getty Images  

New York City

New York City

If you've never been to the Big Apple, stay in Manhattan and check off iconic sights like Central Park, the Met and the National History Museum. If you're coming back, stay in Brooklyn and check out the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and tour famous Brooklyn Brewery. No matter what borough, fresh-made bagels are a must. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Manakin/iStock/Thinkstock  

Atlanta

Atlanta

Whether you have kids or are a kid at heart, don't miss the Atlanta Aquarium, the largest aquarium in the western hemisphere, and the World of Coca-Cola museum, where you can try samples of sodas all over the world. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Nashville

Nashville

Music lovers have to pay a visit to Nashville, just for the roaring bars on Broadway. Rock, country, kararoke, dueling pianos -- they've got it all. Make time to visit Jack White's Third Man Records and our friends at Great American Country say Biscuit Love is the best biscuit in Tennessee. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Brent Moore, Flickr  

Austin

Austin

The funky town is synonymous with SXSW, but we love to visit in October. The first weekend of the month is the Austin City Limits music festival and on Halloween they shut down 6th Street for one big bar-hopping costume party. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

RBStevens / Getty Images / iStockphoto  

New Orleans

New Orleans

Soak up the Big Easy with iconic food spots Felix's for creole favorites and Cafe du Monde for beignets and hazelnut coffee. Sunday jazz brunch at The Court of Two Sisters is a rite of passage. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Denver

Denver

Just east of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado's largest city has a lot of small town charm. Shop the mile-long 16th Street in the heart of downtown and schedule your trip around a show at the Red Rocks ampitheatre inside Red Rocks Park. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Stan Obert, Denver Metro Convention And Visitors Bureau  

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

For a quick escape from L.A., head north to Santa Barbara or the "American Riviera" for picturesque beaches and the rolling green hills of wine country. Make time to visit and Instagram the iconic Old Mission and the gardens at Lotusland. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Bacara Resort and Spa  

San Antonio

San Antonio

You have to cross off a visit to the Alamo and the River Walk if you're in San Antonio, but if you want to spend a weekend like the locals, try the Pearl Farmers Market or tube down the Guadalupe River. And if you're adventurous, make time to visit the underground Natural Bridge Caverns. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Carol Wood/Getty Images  

Charleston

Charleston

No weekend in this Southern food capital is complete without a bowl of shrimp and grits. If you're an early bird, catch the sunrise at Folly Beach. Runners and bikers will love the view from the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

  

Louisville

Louisville

One-third of the world's bourbon comes from Louisville and bourbon lovers can pick up a passport at the visitor's center for stamps at local bars and distilleries. Literary fans should have a drink at The Old Seelbach Bar where F. Scott Fitzgerald once listened to jazz. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Local Louisville, Flickr  

Memphis

Memphis

If you love live music and BBQ there's no better place to visit than Memphis. It might be touristy but camping out at The Peabody Hotel lobby to watch the daily march of the ducks really is adorable, especially if you're traveling with kids. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Tetra Images / Getty Images,Tetra Images  

Savannah

Savannah

If you only have 48 hours in The Hostess City, start at River Street, stopping at Broughton Street for shopping and then head south, meandering through the iconic squares toward Forsyth Park. Lunch at Zuni's is a must. Order the Conquistador with both sauces and don't be alarmed when the staff gives you a hearty cheer. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Photography By iStock  

Monterery

Monterery

A weekend in this California beach town wouldn't be complete without a visit to the Monterey Bay Aquarium. It's one of the largest in the world with more than 35,000 plants and animals. Skip the crowds at Fisherman's Wharf and head out to Pebble Beach to see the famous Lonely Cypress tree. Watch this video for more trip ideas. 960 1280

Aurora / Getty Images  

Williamsburg

Williamsburg

Colonial Williamsburg is a history buff's paradise. Watch reenactments, tour famous homes and walk in the footsteps of George Washington. Schedule a fun and spooky haunted tour at night. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Williamsburg Manor Bed & Breakfast  

Sedona

Sedona

A weekend in red-rock country wouldn't be complete without a hike by day and night. Schedule a moonlit hike through Sedona Hiking Adventures for a different perspective on the landscape. Most resorts offer yoga and spa packages to unwind after a long day outdoors. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

E+ / Getty Images  

Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs

Make it a weekend of natural and historic wonders with a hike up the 224 steps beside Seven Falls, mile walk through Cave of the Winds and a visit to the Manitou Cliff Dwellings. Get more ideas here. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Miami Beach

Miami Beach

Miami Beach is a color explosion with teal water and bright pink and yellow Art Deco buildings. Make time to explore Little Havana east of downtown Miami for vibrant murals, delicious Cuban coffee and plaintain ice cream. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Hilton Worldwide  

Vancouver

Vancouver

Vancouver has European charm with a Portland attitude. And the Pacific seafood and sushi game is strong. Make time for Instagrams at Capilano Suspension Bridge Park and the historic Gastown district. Plan your weekend here. 960 1280

Tourism Vancouver  

Gatlinburg

Gatlinburg

The German-style town nestled beside Tennessee's Great Smoky Mountains National Park offers fun for the whole family with museums, dinner theaters and helicopter tours. For a relaxing weekend, skip the downtown strip and camp inside the national park for beautiful waterfall hikes like Abrahm's Falls and Rainbow Falls. Plan you weekend here. 960 1280

Tennessee Department of Tourist Development  

Pacific Northwest Trail
Pacific Northwest Trail

Pacific Northwest Trail

The Pacific Northwest Trail spans 1,200 miles -- including 3 national parks and 7 national forests. To tackle this route, which runs through Montana, Idaho and Washington, you'll have to keep a pace of 20 miles per day. That'll get you to the trail's end in about 60 days.

Best times to hike:Year-round at lower elevations, summer and fall at higher elevations.
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Andy Porter, flickr   

Appalachian Trail

Appalachian Trail

The famed Appalachian Trail spans more than 2,180 miles. A thru-hike usually takes between 5 and 7 months, cutting through 14 states between Georgia and Maine. Along the way, enjoy views of pink rhododendrons along the trail’s Tennessee-North Carolina state line and in southwest Virginia, from late spring to early summer.

Best times to hike: Spring to fall.
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Thinkstock  

John Muir Trail

John Muir Trail

Naturalist John Muir loved this area of California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range. Today, the trail named in his honor runs 211 miles, from Yosemite Valley to Mount Whitney (the highest point on America’s mainland). Most hikers start their trek at Yosemite’s Happy Isles or Tuolumne Meadows.

Best times to hike: Generally July to September.
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Steve Dunleavy, flickr  

Hayduke Trail

Hayduke Trail

Uber-hiker Andrew Skurka calls Hayduke Trail “one of the finest ways to discover the Colorado Plateau … and get away from it all.” No wonder. The 800-mile trail running through Utah and Arizona covers the area’s big national parks: Zion, Grand Canyon, Bryce, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands and Arches.

Best times to hike: Spring and fall.
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Thinkstock  

Pacific Crest Trail

Pacific Crest Trail

The massive Pacific Crest Trail covers more than 2,600 miles, from California, Oregon and Washington to British Columbia. The trail is among the “Big 3”: If you hike the Pacific Trail, as well as the Continental Divide Trail and the Appalachian Trail, you’ll get the American Long Distance Hiking Association’s Triple Crown Award.

Best times to hike: Late April to late September.
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Marshmallow, flickr  

Sierra High Route

Sierra High Route

The Sierra High Route is one of pro hiker Andrew Skurka’s favorite trails. The 195-mile trail in California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains offers amazing views of meadowlands, lake basins and mountain peaks. Keep a pace of roughly 20 miles per day, and you’ll complete the trail in a little over a week. Also, keep in mind logistical considerations.

Best time to hike: Depends on skill level.
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Getty Images  

Arizona Trail

Arizona Trail

The 800-mile Arizona Trail runs north and south through the state, and showcases some of the region's most unspoiled terrain: ridges, mountains and wilderness areas that have remained untouched since Arizona became a territory in 1863. That remoteness also means hikers must stay current on Arizona Trail conditions.

Best times to hike: Year-round at lower elevations, summer and fall at higher elevations.
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Rick Hall, flickr  

Long Trail

Long Trail

Known simply as the Long Trail, this route runs 273 miles through Vermont -- the whole length of the state. The trail also happens to be America’s first long-distance hiking trail. Construction began in 1912 and continued for nearly 20 years. Today, hikers can enjoy short day hikes and extended treks (including to Mount Mansfield, Vermont’s highest mountain).

Best times to hike: Late spring through late fall.
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dvs, flickr  

Continental Divide Trail

Continental Divide Trail

At 3,100 miles, the Continental Divide Trail is not for the faint of heart: Only about 25 people a year attempt to hike the entire trail, which runs between Mexico and Canada. Some areas can only be traveled by bushwacking, aka make-your-own-trails, and roadwalking.

Best times to hike: April to October.
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Getty Images  

Superior Hiking Trail

Superior Hiking Trail

Everyone loves Superior: Hiker Andrew Skurka ranks the trail among his 10 favorite US hikes, Readers Digest ranks it among its top 5. The 275-mile footpath showcases scenic views -- boreal forests, rushing waterfalls and the 30-mile-long Sawtooth Mountains are among the attractions -- as well as 81 campsites for a little R&R.

Best times to hike: Late spring to early fall.
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Thinkstock  

Florida Trail

Florida Trail

Alligators are among the wild critters that hikers can encounter along the Florida Trail. The 1,400-mile trail starts at Big Cypress National Preserve (about 45 miles west of Miami) and ends in the Pensacola, FL, area. And if you see a gator along the way? Give it space, circling around its tail end so it doesn’t feel threatened.

Best times to hike: Year-round.
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B A Bowen Photography, flickr  

Colorado Trail

Colorado Trail

Hikers, horse riders and bicyclists, the Colorado Trail is calling your name. The 486-mile trail runs from the Denver area to Durango, CO, with some of Colorado’s most beautiful scenery in between: wildlife (marmots, deer, sheep and more), as well as wildflowers, forests, lakes and streams ideal for fishing. A thru-hike generally takes 4 to 6 weeks to complete -- a feat accomplished by roughly 150 people per year.

Best times to hike: Primarily July and August.
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Kimon Berlin, flickr  

Eiffel Tower
Seine River

Seine River

Begin your tour of Paris with a stroll along the Seine River. Explore Île Saint-Louis and Île de la Cité, 2 small islands linked to the banks of the Seine by a series of bridges. Head to Île de la Cité to see the Notre Dame Cathedral or head east to visit the charming hotels, cozy restaurants and small shops. 960 1280

Ekaterina Pokrovsky, Istock  

The Louvre

The Louvre

Be one of 8 million people who flock to the Louvre each year. This grand art museum houses 35,000 masterpieces, including the great Venus de Milo, Leonardo da Vinci’s "Mona Lisa," Eugene Delacroix’s “Liberty Leading the People” and, in the Egyptian wing, “The Seated Scribe.” If it’s your first visit, we recommend taking the introductory guided tour for an overview of the museum’s most famous works. 960 1280

Christophe Lehenaff, Getty Images  

Moulin Rouge

Moulin Rouge

Eat dinner and see a show at the Moulin Rouge -- the birthplace of can-can in its modern form. Located in Paris’ Pigalle district, this tourist attraction was co-founded in 1889 by businessmen Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller. Artists of all stripes soon flocked to the cabaret, including French painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and, in the decades to come, singer Edith Piaf. 960 1280

Valerie Loiseleux, iStock  

Palace of Versailles

Palace of Versailles

Take a day trip outside of Paris and explore the Palace of Versailles. This enormous castle and gardens was once home to 3 generations of French kings and queens, including Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, the last reigning king and queen of France. See the Hall of Mirrors, the Chapelle Royale, the Grand Trianon, estate of Marie-Antoinette and beautiful gardens. Between April and October, the Musical Fountains Show is worth seeing. 960 1280

VERONICA GARBUTT, Getty Images  

Montmartre and the Sacre Coeur Basilica

Montmartre and the Sacre Coeur Basilica

Walk the cobblestone streets of Montmartre and make the steep climb to visit the Sacre Coeur Basilica, also known as the Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris. The basilica is located at the highest point in the city, making it the perfect place for panoramic views of Paris. 960 1280

DanitaDelimont.com, Getty Images  

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower

French engineer Gustave Eiffel spent 2 years trying to erect the Eiffel Tower for the World’s Fair in 1889. And once he did, Parisians were not immediate fans of the metal monument. Today, of course, it has become part of the city’s familiar landscape. We recommend making a stop at the tower at night to see the amazing light show that usually ends at 1 a.m. 960 1280

Steve Lorillere, Getty Images  

Disneyland Paris

Disneyland Paris

For tourists looking for some amusement park fun, we recommend visiting Disneyland Paris. Although the park has been molded to appeal to European tastes (it has plenty of patio seats for outdoor eating), it is still styled similar to the original theme park, with a Main Street U.S.A., Frontierland, Adventureland, Fantasyland and Discoveryland. 960 1280

Pawel Libera, Getty Images  

Pont Alexandre III and Grand Palais

Pont Alexandre III and Grand Palais

Cross over the River Seine, by walking along the ornate Pont Alexandre III bridge, to see Grand Palais. The main exhibition space hosts large-scale shows. Previous must-see art shows included an Edward Hopper retrospective, “Marie Antoinette,” and “Picasso and the Masters.” We suggest you book tickets online before you go. 960 1280

Arjan de Jager, iStock  

Musee d'Orsay

Musee d'Orsay

For art lovers, we suggest a visit to the Musée d'Orsay. Once a railway station, this museum now holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1915. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist masterpieces in the world. Monet, Degas, Renoir and van Gogh are just a few painters whose works are on display at the museum. 960 1280

Atlantide Phototravel, Getty Images  

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

One of the most famous monuments in Paris, the Arc de Triomphe honors those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars. Located in the center of the Place Charles de Gaulle -- at the west end of the Champs-Elysees -- the monument has the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its surface. There is a vault beneath the arc that holds the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I. 960 1280

Lydia Shalet, iStock  

Champ-Elysees

Champ-Elysees

Champs-Elysees is to Paris what Times Square is to New York City. This famous avenue is a popular destination for shoppers with deep pockets, but shopping isn’t the only reason why people flock to this area. Stop by the statue-lined plaza-terrace at the Place du Trocadero for the city’s best view of the Eiffel Tower. Check out a world-class collection of art from all over Asia at the Musee Guimet. Choose from more than 2 dozen flavors of macaroons at Laduree. 960 1280

alxpin, Istock  

Notre Dame Cathedral

Notre Dame Cathedral

The bishop of Paris from 1160 to 1196, Maurice de Sully spearheaded the movement to rebuild a cathedral dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Located on the Île de la Cité, Notre Dame Cathedral offers guided tours, but the 360-degree views of the city are what’s really amazing and not to be missed. 960 1280

gbarm, Istock  

Palais Garnier Opera House of Paris

Palais Garnier Opera House of Paris

Built between 1861 and 1875, the Palais Garnier is known for its opulence and architecture, and, most notably, for being the setting for Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel, The Phantom of the Opera. Palais Garnier does provide unaccompanied tours, which also include a walk through the Paris Opera Library-Museum. Designed by Charles Garnier, this palatial, nearly 2,000-seat opera house is now primarily used for ballet performances. 960 1280

AlexKozlov, iStock  

Les Marais

Les Marais

Les Marais is the cool neighborhood in Paris, with hip boutiques, art galleries, designer hotels and fashion houses. Although Les Marais is the hub of the city’s gay community, there are numerous must-see attractions here, including Place des Vosges, the oldest square in Paris, Musee Carnavalet, a museum that shows how Paris has evolved, Musee des Arts et Metiers, Europe’s oldest science museum, and Centre Pompidou, which houses a large public reading library and the National Museum of Modern Art. 960 1280

DanitaDelimont.com, Getty Images  

Rainbow row
Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge

Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge

The impressive Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge not only offers a beautiful drive across the Cooper River, it also makes for a nice walk or bike ride in the early-morning and late-evening hours. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Isle of Palms

Isle of Palms

A popular destination for many visitors and residents in Charleston is the Isle of Palms, which offers plenty of vacation rentals. Only about 25 minutes from downtown Charleston, it is a great spot for a quick walk on the beach -- and you’ll be back just in time for dinner. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Charleston City Market

Charleston City Market

Situated along the “beaten path” -- but still definitely worth a visit -- is the Charleston City Market. Go shopping for handmade baskets, Southern spices and more. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Fort Sumter National Monument

Fort Sumter National Monument

The monument marking the official location of the start of the Civil War is accessible via ferry from downtown Charleston or Mount Pleasant. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Old Exchange Building and Provost Dungeon

Old Exchange Building and Provost Dungeon

This is a must-see in Charleston. Take a tour and learn all about the rich history of the site, where President Washington greeted locals, assemblies were held in the 18th century and a prison operated during the American Revolution. 960 1280

Travis S., Flickr  

Charleston Farmers Market

Charleston Farmers Market

Located in Marion Square, the Charleston Farmers Market is open every Saturday from early April through mid-December. The market sells fresh produce and specialty items, including homemade candles, textiles and jewelry. Local vendors serve breakfast and lunch.  960 1280

Charleston's TheDigitel, Flickr  

Battery Park

Battery Park

So-called Battery Park, aka White Point Garden, is a bucket-list item for all Charleston visitors. Cornered by the Cooper River on 1 side and the Ashley River on another, it is home to gorgeous Southern mansions, as well as American Revolution and Civil War history. 960 1280

Charleston Area CVB   

Belmond Charleston Place

Belmond Charleston Place

Belmond Charleston Place is a luxurious hotel option for those visiting the city. It includes wonderful dining options, such as the Charleston Grill and the Palmetto Cafe, as well as high-end shopping. 960 1280

Joe Vaughn/ Orient-Express  

King Street

King Street

The place to be in Charleston is King Street, where much of the action occurs between Calhoun and Market streets. The area is home to a handful of cute boutiques, mainstream shops and mom-and-pop restaurants.

 

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Panoramic Images/ Getty Images  

Hyman’s Seafood Restaurant

Hyman’s Seafood Restaurant

A favorite among out-of-towners, Hyman’s Seafood is a great place for low-country cuisine. Be prepared for a long wait to be seated — not uncommon for several restaurants in Charleston. 960 1280

Rani Robinson  

South Carolina Aquarium

South Carolina Aquarium

This attraction on Charleston Harbor is a wonderful stop for the family. See the renovated Saltmarsh Aviary; the Coastal Plain exhibit, which houses a rare albino alligator; and a 4-D adventure theater.  960 1280

South Carolina Aquarium  

Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry

Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry

Located in downtown Charleston, this museum is a must for the kids. Children ages 10 and under interact with 9 hands-on, interactive exhibits, including a “true-to-size” grocery store. 960 1280

Rani Robinson  

Rainbow Row

Rainbow Row

Established in the 1700s, the area now known as “Rainbow Row” was the center of Charleston’s commerce district. Today, it’s all residential, but it’s a beautiful place to see before you leave the city. 960 1280

Rani Robinson  

Colonial Lake

Colonial Lake

Explore historical Charleston in a mini coach to see sights such as Rainbow Row, the Joseph Manigault House and Colonial Lake (pictured). The tidal pond with walkways is a popular park area and hangout for locals. 960 1280

Cindy Robinson/Moment/Getty Images  

Folly Beach

Folly Beach

Take a private charter from Charleston and sail to Morris Island and Folly Island. And don’t forget to make a stop to visit quaint Folly Beach to enjoy sun, sand, fishing and a leisurely stroll along the pier. 960 1280

Aimintang/iStock/Getty Images  

Joseph Manigault House

Joseph Manigault House

Take a step back in time at the Joseph Manigault House, one of Charleston’s most fascinating antebellum homes. Built in 1803, this residence was the home of a wealthy rice-planting family and its African-American slaves. Gabriel Manigault designed the home for his brother, and most of its rooms have been restored to their original color schemes, with furniture dating back to the early 19th century. 960 1280

Richard Cummins/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images  

For the Music Lover: New Orleans
For the Jet Setter: Puerto Rico

For the Jet Setter: Puerto Rico

East Coasters looking for an exotic locale without technically leaving the country should consider Puerto Rico's stunning beaches and tropical weather. Head straight to a resort for some R&R or soak up San Juan's nightlife with bottle service at Club Brava inside the San Juan Hotel or salsa dancing to a live band at Nuyorican Cafe. Hint: let a local lead. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

For the Sex-and-the-City Devotee: New York City

For the Sex-and-the-City Devotee: New York City

The Big Apple is the quintessential bachelorette party destination -- no matter which borough you choose to celebrate in -- boutique shopping with a side of cronut in Soho, rooftop cocktails at The Standard in the Meatpacking District, or craft beer and pizza at hipster-haven Roberta's in Brooklyn. 960 1280

iStock  

For the Party Girl: Las Vegas

For the Party Girl: Las Vegas

The life of the party expects nothing less than a big ole' Vegas-style bachelorette. Splurge on a poolside cabana at REHAB at the Hard Rock, see some Cirque and then hit the club -- just hopefully you won't end the weekend on the Hangover Bus. 960 1280

Getty Images  

For the Adventurer: Vail, CO

For the Adventurer: Vail, CO

Vail is a great option for the bride who can't sit still. Off the slopes, your party can take a Cocktails & Canvas class at the Alpine Arts Center, go whitewater rafting, zip line in the Colorado Mountains or ride horses from Beaver Creek Stables. Regardless of the season, check into the luxurious Cordillera Lodge -- the mountaintop retreat's award-winning spa is renowned for its relaxation treatments. 960 1280

Getty Images  

For the Music Lover: New Orleans

For the Music Lover: New Orleans

Depending on the bride’s music taste, we suggest either attending New Orleans’ annual Jazz Fest or singing karaoke on stage at Cat's Meow -- they'll even provide a DVD of her performance. Dine al fresco on Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar's patio along St. Charles Avenue for traditional Louisiana seafood and Creole fare or spice things up with class at the New Orleans School of Burlesque before a Bourbon Street bar crawl. 960 1280

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For the Sun Worshipper: Miami

For the Sun Worshipper: Miami

After a day of oceanfront lounging drinking and dining in South Beach hit Blo a blow-dry bar where you can sip wine and primp for your big night out. Then prepare to see-and-be-seen at STK steakhouse and hotspot LIV. For those still feeling inspired by Channing Tatum's moves in Magic Mike Hunk-O-Mania is a Miami bachelorette party mainstay. 960 1280

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For the Foodie: Charleston

For the Foodie: Charleston

Consider renting a beach house in nearby Sullivan's Island or stay in downtown Charleston for Upper King Street shopping Lowcountry cooking classes at Maverick Southern Kitchens and a smattering of stylish downtown restaurants and bars like Social Wine Bar. The Cocktail Club is a foodie's dream -- the rooftop terrace houses a garden where many of the drinks' garnishes are picked daily. 960 1280

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For the Francophile: Montreal

For the Francophile: Montreal

She may only dream of honeymooning in Paris but she can get a taste of French culture (and cuisine) as you stroll by the mostly French shops and restos along rue St.-Denis. To truly take advantage of Montreal's nightlife get chauffeured around by Montreal Limousine (which offers everything from town cars to party buses). Then partake in the Saint-Laurent club scene à la Le Rouge or take in an entertaining drag queen show at Cabaret Mado. 960 1280

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For the Celeb Spotter: Cabo San Lucas

For the Celeb Spotter: Cabo San Lucas

With dreams of marrying Justin Timberlake now out the window she can still vacation like a celebrity in Cabo San Lucas Mexico. Rent a yacht from the Love Shack and spend the day snorkeling swimming and lounging margarita-in-hand on deck. Just a 2-hour flight from Los Angeles there's no telling how many A-listers you might run into (infinity) poolside especially if you splurge on a suite at Las Ventanas al Paraiso. The hotel -- and spa -- are said to be among Jennifer Aniston and Jennifer Lopez favorites. 960 1280

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For the Quirky Girl: Austin

For the Quirky Girl: Austin

"Get weird" in a town that embraces it. Yes it has a dueling piano bar and Cherry Bomb party bus but we suggest focusing on daytime activities like floating down the Guadalupe River beer in hand with River Sports Tubes or sipping cocktails at the W Austin's rowdy pool party. Indulge in mouthwatering Tex Mex at La Condesa (where you can book a private dining room for up to 20) before heading out into the "live music capital of the world." 960 1280

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For the Oenophile: Napa Valley

For the Oenophile: Napa Valley

Your friendship is like a fine wine it keeps getting better over time. Check into the scenic Carneros Inn where you can lounge by the pool in between spa treatments. After a weekend of Napa Valley wine tours catch the sunrise from a hot air balloon with Balloons Above the Valley that also offers a champagne brunch upon landing. 960 1280

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Start Planning

Seaside, South Walton, FL

Seaside, South Walton, FL

With turquoise waters, white sandy beaches and 16 charming beach neighborhoods, it’s hard to pick just one best beach for kids in South Walton, but time and again, families flock to Seaside on Florida’s northwest coast. Enjoy biking and stand-up paddleboarding before heading to Airstream Row for food trucks serving up everything from grilled cheese to homemade custard.  960 1280

Shuvabrata Deb  

Kailua Beach Park, Kailua, HI

Kailua Beach Park, Kailua, HI

A favorite beach for many on Oahu, Kailua Beach Park boasts turquoise blue waters, plenty of free parking and lots of family-friendly water activities, like kayaking and boogie boarding. Kids will love watching the kite surfers, maybe even more than a trip to Island Snow for shave ice. Kalapawai Market is located at the park entrance, so pick up some deli sandwiches for an afternoon picnic on the beach. 

 

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Laszlo Podor Photography  

Agios Georgios Beach, Naxos, Greece

Agios Georgios Beach, Naxos, Greece

Many of the beaches in Naxos boast warm waters that are gentle and shallow, particularly those on the southwest coast of the island, making them ideal for families with small children. One of the best is Agios Georgios Beach. Eat breakfast at one of the cafés on the beach for fantastic views of the bay. The beach is also an easy walk to Hora, the island’s colorful capital city.  960 1280

Danita Delimont  

St. Pete Beach, St. Petersburg, FL

St. Pete Beach, St. Petersburg, FL

For white sandy beaches and calm, clear waters, St. Pete Beach is a must for families. Grab your fishing poles and sleeping bags for a camp-out right on the beach at Fort De Soto Park. Bike along a 7-mile paved trail, kayak or canoe through mangrove forests and take time to explore the historic fort. You can even take your furry pal to a dog park called Paw Playground.  960 1280

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Maho Bay Beach, St. John

Maho Bay Beach, St. John

Situated on the north shore of St. John, the calm waters make Maho Bay Beach the ideal spot for learning to stand-up paddleboard as a family. It’s also one of the best places on the island to see sea turtles, particularly on the west side of the bay where snorkelers can watch turtles and rays munching on the sea grasses. For hiking, try the Cinnamon Bay Nature Trail.  960 1280

Christian Wheatley  

St. Augustine Beach, St. Augustine, FL

St. Augustine Beach, St. Augustine, FL

For wide beaches, a 4-acre beachfront park and plenty of space to play, even with your dog, head to St. Augustine Beach in St. Augustine. Walk along the shores where Spanish explorers landed so many years ago, then let the kids go wild at the splash park on the pier. Spend time at nearby Anastasia State Park where you can bike on the beach and paddle in a saltwater lagoon.    960 1280

Danita Delimont  

Carmel Beach, Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA

Carmel Beach, Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA

Kids can play on the white sandy beach by day and make s’mores around a bonfire by night at Carmel Beach. Pet lovers will love this dog-friendly (and leash-free) beach, so bring a tennis ball or two to make a few new furry friends. Take the free trolley into town for cheese blintzes at the Little Swiss Café or ride out to Monterey for an afternoon at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.  960 1280

Elfi Kluck  

Menemsha Beach, Martha's Vineyard, MA

Menemsha Beach, Martha's Vineyard, MA

Martha’s Vineyard is widely touted as one of the loveliest parts of New England, though kids may love the area more for its beaches than its beauty. Try Menemsha Beach, a popular pick for families in search of gentle surf, fantastic sunsets and one of the best clam shacks on the island. Crowds at The Bite line up early, so keep this in mind if you’re thinking about a beach picnic.  960 1280

Jihan Abdalla  

Coligny Beach, Hilton Head, SC

Coligny Beach, Hilton Head, SC

For families who want to be active from morning until night, head to Hilton Head for kayaking, tennis, crabbing, stand-up paddleboarding, and of course, splashing in the waves at Coligny Beach. Rent bikes at Hilton Head Outfitters in Palmetto Dunes. It’s the best way to explore the island. Go on a boat cruise with Pirates of Hilton Head or fly through the sky at Zipline Hilton Head.  960 1280

Pam McLean  

Short Sands Beach, York, ME

Short Sands Beach, York, ME

One of several popular beaches in York, Short Sands Beach has sand, surf, a playground, and even an arcade. Have a picnic at Ellis Park then spend the afternoon at York’s Wild Kingdom, the largest zoo and amusement park in Maine. Take the trolley to Long Sands Beach for views of the Cape Leddick Lighthouse before heading to the “Surfing Only” area to pick up pointers from the surfers. 960 1280

John Churchman  

Coronado Central Beach, San Diego, CA

Coronado Central Beach, San Diego, CA

Just across the bridge from downtown San Diego you’ll find Coronado Central Beach. Kids will love building castles from sand that glistens year-round thanks to the glittery mineral, mica, which is mixed in with the sand. Walk along the beach to take in historic mansions, as well as the majestic Hotel del Coronado, the inspiration behind Walt Disney World’s Grand Floridian.  960 1280

Chiara Salvadori  

Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman Island

Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman Island

Consistently ranked among the best beaches in the Caribbean, Seven Mile Beach has soft, white sand and gentle waters that are ideal for first-time snorkelers eager to see tropical fish and colorful coral reefs. Off the beach, kids can splash in the fountains at Camana Bay, pet stingrays at Stingray City and get up-close with green sea turtles at the Cayman Turtle Farm.  960 1280

Robin Hill  

Resort Beach, Virginia Beach, VA

Resort Beach, Virginia Beach, VA

There’s no shortage of things to do both on and off the beach in Virginia Beach. Walk or ride a surrey bike along the 3-mile boardwalk before snapping a selfie with the 34-foot bronze statue of King Neptune. Go horseback riding or take surfing lessons at Resort Beach, then let the kids go wild at Grommet Island Beach Park, a 100% wheelchair accessible children’s park.  960 1280

Don Klumpp  

Podaca Beach, Makarska Riviera, Croatia

Podaca Beach, Makarska Riviera, Croatia

Stretching nearly 40 miles between Makarska and Split is the Makarska Riviera, which boasts a number of beach towns with palm tree-lined promenades, ice cream shops and pedal boats to take out onto the delightfully blue water. Book a villa or stay in a family-run campsite along the pebble beach. Off the beach, kids will love hiking around nearby Biokovo Nature Park.   960 1280

Graham Monro/gm photographics  

Cannon Beach, OR

Cannon Beach, OR

Cannon Beach is wide and flat, offering plenty of room for kids to walk, run, ride three-wheelers or go tide pooling in search of sea life and shells. Its postcard attraction is Haystack Rock, a 235-foot tall rock, which sits on the beach near the downtown area. Kite flying is perfect at Cannon Beach since the winds seem to blow at just the right speed. 960 1280

Stephen Curtin  

Coast Guard Beach, Eastham, MA

Coast Guard Beach, Eastham, MA

Cape Cod is a favorite year after year and Coast Guard Beach is perfect for long walks and building sand castles as a family. At the Salt Pond Visitor Center, pick up the park newspaper for the scoop on ranger-led nature walks and Junior Ranger programs. Ride bikes along one of three paved bike trails or go kayaking through the famous salt marshes.  960 1280

John Greim  

Corolla, NC

Corolla, NC

The Outer Banks of North Carolina has long been a top pick for families. Book a vacation rental right on the soft, sandy beach or park near the southernmost beach access point in Corolla for restrooms and showers. Go biking, take the ferry to Knotts Island or get hip to all kinds of water sports at Kitty Hawk Kayaks & Surf School.  960 1280

Josh Rinehults  

Gulf State Park, Gulf Shores, AL

Gulf State Park, Gulf Shores, AL

In summer, families flock to incredible beach towns in Alabama, like Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. Kids will have a ball swimming, crabbing and kayaking along the two-mile stretch of beach at Gulf State Park. There are hiking and biking trails, as well as a nature center that hosts guided nature walks. Just off the beach, head to Waterville USA for water slides, a lazy river and mini golf.  960 1280

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Poipu Beach Park, Kauai, HI

Poipu Beach Park, Kauai, HI

Families with kids of all ages will love Poipu Beach Park. Look for snorkeling and surfing for the big kids, as well as a playground and a shallow wading area for little ones. Enjoy a picnic under the shade of the palm trees or go for a coastal hike along the Mahaulepu Heritage Trail. In the evening, book a relaxing sunset catamaran cruise to see more of the scenic south side of the island.  960 1280

Steven Greaves  

Coco Plum Beach, Exumas, Bahamas

Coco Plum Beach, Exumas, Bahamas

The beaches of the Exumas are among the best in the Bahamas, especially for those eager to return home with beautiful shells and sand dollars. Located on the north end of Grand Exuma, Coco Plum Beach is a quiet beach with plenty of shady palm trees. For lunch, head to Big D’s Conch Stop, which serves up tasty conch fritters and salads.  960 1280

Danita Delimont  

La Concha Beach, San Sebastian, Spain

La Concha Beach, San Sebastian, Spain

One of the most famous city beaches in Europe, La Concha Beach, is also one of the best beaches for familes. Look for a carousel and multiple playgrounds that dot the beach and the town. Take the funicular railway to the top of Monte Igueldo for unmatched views of La Concha Bay. As a bonus, there’s an amusement park at the summit complete with bumper cars and pony rides.  960 1280

Alex Lapuerta  

Kiawah Beachwalker Park, Kiawah Island, SC

Kiawah Beachwalker Park, Kiawah Island, SC

Just south of Charleston, explore nature, wildlife and beautiful South Carolina coastline on Kiawah Island. Kids can sing songs and take art lessons at Kamp Kiawah, as well as splash and play at Kiawah Beachwalker Park, a quiet beach that’s well-suited for small children. Rent bikes to explore the island or take classes to become a Junior Naturalist.  960 1280

Ash Lindsey Photography  

Long Beach, WA

Long Beach, WA

Dig for razor clams or take in the views of the Pacific from the half-mile wooden boardwalk located on the Long Beach Peninsula. Explore nearby lighthouses with the kids, hike along the Willapa Interpretive Art Trail or get your game on at the Funland Arcade. Work up an appetite paddling at Willapa Bay before indulging in a milkshake at Hungry Harbor Grille.  960 1280

photo by p.Folrev  

Bowman’s Beach, Sanibel Island, FL

Bowman’s Beach, Sanibel Island, FL

With more than 25 miles of paved trails, Sanibel Island is a fantastic place to explore by bike. Look for warm waters and gentle surf, as well as more than 300 kinds of seashells. Enroll the kids in Sanibel Sea School to learn about marine conservation before hopping a ferry to Cayo Costa State Park. Families will especially love Bowman’s Beach, which has a playground and magical sunsets.   960 1280

Danita Delimont  

Assateague Island National Seashore, MD

Assateague Island National Seashore, MD

Nearly 38 miles long, the Assateague Island National Seashore is a protected wildlife sanctuary. Stay in nearby Chincoteague or camp out on the beach of this barrier island. Kids will love hiking, clamming, crabbing and fishing on the beach, but the main attraction is the wild ponies, which have roamed the beaches and saltwater marshes since the 1600s.  960 1280

Trina Dopp Photography  

Wingaersheek Beach, Gloucester, MA

Wingaersheek Beach, Gloucester, MA

Known for soft, white sands and gentle waters, Wingaersheek Beach is the place to take the kids at low tide where you’ll find loads of clams, shells, even sand dollars, all over the beach. Pack a picnic lunch or grab a bite at one of several snack shops that that dot the beach. Parking isn’t cheap and you’ll need to get there early but you will be rewarded with kids who can’t wait to go back.  960 1280

Garry Black  

Eagle Beach, Aruba

Eagle Beach, Aruba

Kids and families love Eagle Beach in Aruba. It’s a beach where you can easily spend the entire day relaxing in a beach chair and splashing in the turquoise waters. Walk along the beach in search of the island’s famous Divi Divi trees. Water sports are popular, so rent a jet ski, a kayak or a stand-up paddleboard, or get set up to go snorkeling or parasailing.  960 1280

Holger Leue  

Sunset Beach, Cape May, NJ

Sunset Beach, Cape May, NJ

Sunset Beach is one of a handful of spots on the east coast where you can see the sunset from the beach. Come for the Victorian homes, the free parking and the crab cake sandwiches at the Sunset Beach Grill. Kids will love splashing in the surf and hunting for Cape May diamonds (quartz pebbles). Bring a camera to snap photos of the S.S. Atlantus, which sits just offshore.  960 1280

chrisstadlerphotography  

Camusdarach Beach, Arisaig, Scotland

Camusdarach Beach, Arisaig, Scotland

Located in one of the most scenic parts of the Scottish Highlands, you won’t go wrong camping near Camusdarach Beach and taking sea kayaks out into the water to explore the coves. Children will love playing in the sand and the calm, clear waters on the beach. Collect shells and enjoy the views of the Isle of Skye before settling in for the evening sunset.  960 1280

Peter Lewis  

Clearwater Beach, Clearwater, FL

Clearwater Beach, Clearwater, FL

Pier 60 is the place to be in Clearwater Beach for spectacular sunsets and a nightly sunset festival that includes live music, magicians, stilt walkers and local artisans. The crystal clear, warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico makes this a great choice for families. Book a dolphin cruise or take to the sky for parasailing. Look to nearby Caladesi Island State Park for great shelling.  960 1280

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For the Sports Fanatic: Chicago

For the Sports Fanatic: Chicago

It’s easy to see why Chicago is quickly becoming one of the most popular bachelor party destinations in the US. The city has something for everyone. Beach? Check. Professional sports? Check. The Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, Cubs and White Sox all call Chicago home. Food? Check. Deep-dish pizza and Italian sausage are a must. And Beer? Um, check! Chicago has more than 60 breweries inside its city limits alone. 960 1280

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For the Jetsetter on a Coach Budget: Montreal

For the Jetsetter on a Coach Budget: Montreal

There are a myriad of reasons to visit Montreal, not least of which is its affordable and late-club scene centered along the 7-mile-long Boulevard Saint-Laurent, as well as the city’s fantastic summer festival lineup (including its fantastic beer, jazz and comedy fests), and its access to European flair without ever leaving the continent.
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For the Over-Indulgent: New Orleans

For the Over-Indulgent: New Orleans

The Big Easy is unmatched for its ready-made party atmosphere and dedication to nonstop indulgence -- and no boulevard in the city is better suited to carousing than Bourbon Street. Some of the country's best music can be found at joints like Tipitina’s and Preservation Hall, and legendary restaurants like Brennan's will have you savoring your waning days of bachelorhood with bull shots, red roosters and so much more.
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For the Beer Lover: Milwaukee

For the Beer Lover: Milwaukee

Wisconsin isn’t the most obvious potential bachelor party locale, but its biggest city has a lot more going for it bro-wise than you might think. Home to both MillerCoors and an abundance of worthy microbreweries, from Horny Goat Brewing Co. to good ole Milwaukee Brewing Company, Milwaukee has well earned its Brew City nickname. Stay at the bro-riffically brand new Brewhouse Inn & Suites, a boutique hotel located in the 20-acre downtown complex that housed the Pabst Brewery for over 150 years. 960 1280

Darren Hauck / Getty Images  

For the Music Fan: Nashville

For the Music Fan: Nashville

It ain’t called the Music City for nothin’! Now, I’m not saying there aren’t other places music lover’s should go on their bachelor parties (see New Orleans), but there is nowhere better in the world — for fans of country music — than Nashville. Without fail, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, you can find live music. Maybe music isn’t your thing. Don’t worry. Nashville still has plenty of amazing options for a bachelor. Like sports? Maybe a Predators hockey game or a Titans football game is more your speed. And no place on our list does barbecue quite like Nashville. 960 1280

Danita Delimont / Getty Images  

For the Classic Party Guy: Las Vegas

For the Classic Party Guy: Las Vegas

Sure a Vegas getaway for the guys is popular, but for good reason. From high-stakes gambling and all-day pool parties, to over-the-top clubs, Las Vegas is a nonstop full-tilt playground that’s the stuff of countless epic bro weekends.
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For the Adventure Seeker: Aspen

For the Adventure Seeker: Aspen

If you’re looking to hit the slopes for a fun, fast-paced bachelor party, you really can’t go wrong heading out west. However, there is one particular Colorado destination that seems to stand out the most for me, and that’s Aspen. I know, I know, the word Aspen immediately makes people think wealth and pretentiousness. Not to say that those things aren’t present, but Aspen also offers its visitors so much more than that. Rent a cabin or stay at one of the famous ski-in/ski-out resorts with a bunch of your buddies and immerse yourself in Aspen’s cool, laid-back environment. The Apres-ski conditions don’t get much better either. Fire pits, hot tubs, live music and great food amongst other things are available at your fingertips around every corner. 960 1280

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For the Sea Lover: Yacht Week

For the Sea Lover: Yacht Week

Perhaps the ultimate bachelor party destination isn’t just one destination at all. Maybe, it’s a choice between several awe-inspiring European countries, known simply as Yacht Week. Throughout the summer, friends get together for the perfect “marriage” of partying and sailing through picturesque landscapes on the high seas. Bachelors get to choose which route they’d like to cruise, with special offers including trips around Croatia, Greece, Italy, Turkey, the British Virgin Islands and Thailand. And don’t forget to sign up well in advance; the different countries only have a limited number of yachts permitted per route, per week. 960 1280

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For the Night Life Enthusiast: Miami

For the Night Life Enthusiast: Miami

With its awesome oceanfront views, amazing food, easy access to some of the country's best sports, and 24-hour club scene, Miami’s South Beach has all the features of an ultimate bachelor fest. The restaurant scene is teeming with superstars like the 10,000-square-foot penthouse Juvia and the Florida outposts of New York City icons like Scarpetta and The Dutch. Not-to-miss party spots include Nikki Beach Club by day and LIV by night. 960 1280

Scott B Smith Photography / Getty Images  

For the Golf Pro: Phoenix

For the Golf Pro: Phoenix

For the sports-minded posse, the greater Phoenix area aims to please, with year-round sunshine and warm temps that make it perfect for enjoying the scores of superb golf courses, pro baseball’s Cactus League lineup, and a multitude of fantastic hiking and climbing options nearby in great outdoor spots like Camelback Mountain. And since no self-respecting bachelor weekend can be 100% healthy, the area is also surprisingly rife with nightlife and several casinos are within easy driving distance. 960 1280

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For the Beach Bro: Rio de Janeiro

For the Beach Bro: Rio de Janeiro

When it’s winter in the Northern Hemisphere, opposite-seasoned Rio de Janeiro makes for an especially magnetic stag party destination. And how many of your buddies can say they had their bachelor fests in the sizzling beachside host city of both the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics? You’ll never need to leave the utopian Copacabana/Ipanema area, but for a little more authenticity and adventure, check out the even livelier Lapa neighborhood. 960 1280

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Wizarding World of Harry Potter
Wizarding World of Harry Potter

Wizarding World of Harry Potter

Based on the "Harry Potter" books and films, The Wizarding World of Harry Potter is a $200-million theme-park at Universal Orlando that had its grand opening on June 18, 2010.  The park includes rides like the Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey, Dragon Challenge and Flight of the Hippogriff.  Diagon Alley opened July 8, 2014. 960 1280

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Triple-Decker Knight Bus

Triple-Decker Knight Bus

Hop aboard the Knight Bus if you're a stranded member of the wizarding community. To hail the bus, a witch or wizard can just stick their wand up in the air in the same manner that a muggle would do to hail a taxi. It is possible to book tickets for travel on the bus in advance. 960 1280

Universal Orlando Resort  

Hogwarts Express

Hogwarts Express

The Hogwarts Express waits to transport young wizards at Hogsmeade Station at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter.
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By Rain0975 [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Diagon Alley

Diagon Alley

Diagon Alley, with its cobblestone-ladden roads, is the perfect place to get all of your necessities for the upcoming school year at Hogwarts. Diagon Alley is lined with inns, pubs, book shops, clothing stores and much more. 960 1280

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Gringotts Bank

Gringotts Bank

Diagon Alley includes the thrill ride, Harry Potter and the Escape from Gringotts. This attraction combines 360-degree themed sets, high-definition animation, state-of-the-art 3-D projection systems and live effects with characters and moments form the final "Harry Potter" book and film. And make sure you visit Gringotts Bank (pictured) -- it's the only bank in the Wizarding World owned and operated by goblins. 960 1280

Universal Orlando Resort  

Ollivander's Wand Shop

Ollivander's Wand Shop

An essential stop for any witch or wizard going to choose a wand (or better yet, let the wand choose them), Ollivander’s Wand Shop is a must-visit in Diagon Alley.
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Bloomburg/Getty Images  

Daily Prophet

Daily Prophet

The place to turn your attention for all-things  wizarding, the Daily Prophet is a long-standing newspaper conglomerate located in Diagon Alley.
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By osseous from Oakland Park, U.S.A. (October 25, 2014) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry

Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry

Hogwarts school majestically towers over the theme park, bringing the tales of Harry and friends to life. 960 1280

Rstoplabe14 at English Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons  

Hogwarts Portrait Gallery

Hogwarts Portrait Gallery

The Hogwarts portrait gallery is just as described in the books with talking portraits of wizards decorating the walls. 960 1280

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Hogsmeade Village

Hogsmeade Village

The Harry Potter theme park re-creates the picturesque Hogsmeade village with shops and restaurants you'll recognize straight from the books. 960 1280

Orlando Sentinial/Getty Images  

Honeydukes

Honeydukes

You’ll enjoy your trip to Hogsmeade like a kid in a candy shop … or should I say, like a wizard in a candy shop! Honeydukes is the premier place to get all your chocolate and candy needs in one stop.

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By The Conmunity - Pop Culture Geek from Los Angeles, CA, USA [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Hog's Head Pub

Hog's Head Pub

Looking for a cold glass of butterbeer? Hog’s Head is a local pub located in Hogsmeade where muggles can stop in and try an assortment of alcoholic beverages. 960 1280

By Snowman Guy [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons  

Three Broomsticks

Three Broomsticks

Located in the heart of Hogsmeade, Three Broomsticks is a popular restaurant known for their fish and chips, as well as shepherd’s pie and other assorted goodies. 960 1280

By The Conmunity - Pop Culture Geek from Los Angeles, CA, USA [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

The Owlery

The Owlery

Visitors can rest their legs and observe the roosting owls at the Owlery across from the Three Broomsticks. 960 1280
Dumbledore's Office

Dumbledore's Office

Guests get a peek at Dumbledore's office tucked inside Hogwarts castle where the magic happens.
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By Karen Roe from Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, UK [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Dragon Challenge

Dragon Challenge

Guests make their way to Dragon Challenge, two dueling roller coasters that twist, turn and careen toward each other.
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By Snowman Guy (talk).Snowman Guy at en.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons  

Hagrid's Hut

Hagrid's Hut

Guests can view a re-creation of Hagrid's Hut on their way to ride the Flight of the Hippogriff.
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By The Conmunity - Pop Culture Geek from Los Angeles, CA, USA (Wizarding World of Harry Potter - Hagrid's hut) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Flight of the Hippogriff

Flight of the Hippogriff

Named after the Hippogriff Buckbeak, (which has the head of an eagle and the body of a horse), Flight of the Hippogriff is a family-friendly coaster that flies past Hagrid's hut. 960 1280

By popculturegeek.com from Los Angeles, CA, USA [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Flying Ford Anglia

Flying Ford Anglia

After Ron and Harry miss the Hogwarts Express in the "The Chamber of Secrets," they steal Mr. Weasley’s flying car in an attempt to make it to school on time. Unfortunately, the car never made it back to The Burrow, the home of Ron's family, but now resides here, trapped amongst the trees.
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By Jeremy Thompson from United States of America [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Paddle the Pacific

Paddle the Pacific

Anacapa Island in the Channel Islands National Park, just off the coast of Los Angeles, is home to some of the best kayaking on the West Coast. Rich with marine life and boasting the much-photographed Arch Rock, Anacapa is the perfect day trip or overnighter for the city dweller looking to get into some rough water. It’s a cliff island, so beware of winds, currents and fog.  

 

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Great Art Productions  

Float the Border

Float the Border

The mighty Rio Grande runs through Big Bend National Park in Texas, but it also represents the border between the U.S. and Mexico. Rafting down the river not only takes you through some eye-widening scenery, like 1500-foot deep canyons, but will also toss you back and forth across the border. 960 1280

Witold Skrypczak  

Hit the Sandy Slopes

Hit the Sandy Slopes

Colorado has Aspen, one of the most famous skiing destinations on the planet. It also has Sand Dunes National Park, one of the only sandboarding and sandsledding destinations on the planet. Slalom down the granular slopes like some diabolical combination of Jean-Claude Killy and Lawrence of Arabia. Hit the dunes early in the morning or late in the evening, lest you roast in the 150° midday heat. And don’t forget the lip balm.

 

 

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Simon Russell  

Cold Storage

Cold Storage

The upper regions of Washington’s Mount Rainier National Park have over 35 square miles of permanent ice and snow, providing a year-round paradise for hearty souls who consider ice camping a pleasure. If you’re going to stay the night on the mountain, securely lock your vittles to keep them from the clutches of foxes and other aggressive winter wildlife. 960 1280

Peter Haley  

Take in the Lights

Take in the Lights

Minnesota's Voyageurs National Park sits just below the Canadian border and offers campers a ringside seat to the Northern Lights. Voyageurs encompasses 270 campsites only accessible by watercraft, but we recommend the remote Echo Lake Campground for best visibility. Check a variety of weather services to determine your best chance of seeing the Northern Lights. 960 1280

Steve Burns  

Yosemite Gliding

Yosemite Gliding

It may seem crazy, but people have been leaping off Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park for decades. Hang gliding was once sanctioned and overseen by park employees. These days the private Yosemite Hang Gliding Association coordinates it. 960 1280

Celso Diniz  

The Rafters

The Rafters

If a weekend of seething whitewater just doesn’t cut it anymore, try an eight-day Grand Canyon raft trip down the Colorado River. There are a host of operators who will happily guide you down 200 miles of rapids. By the end of it, you’ll have seen Native-American ruins, mile-high cliff walls and countless eagles. 960 1280

  

Hit the Heights

Hit the Heights

Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park boasts rock formations that will set a climber’s mouth to watering. The 415-square-mile park is a full-service climbing destination, featuring opportunities for scaling rock, wall, ice and snow. Lumpy Ridge and Longs Peak are favorites of local and international climbers. Whether you are an experienced sport climber or a beginning boulderer, be safe and leave no trace of your visit.

 

 

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Forest Woodward  

Lost in America

Lost in America

It makes sense that America’s largest national park is in Alaska, its largest state. Wrangell-Saint Elias stretches across 13,200,000 acres. You could fit Yellowstone, Everglades, and Death Valley inside it, and still have room for Denali, the third largest park (also in Alaska) at 6,075,030 acres. 960 1280

  

Take Me to the River

Take Me to the River

In addition to being the most popular hike in Zion National Park, the Narrows has something for every ability level over its 16 miles. The trail follows the Virgin River, which is convenient during the summer months, since you’ll be at least ankle-deep most of the time. If it starts to rain, head for high ground; flash floods are common and have a tendency to drop by without calling first.  960 1280

  

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