New Seven Wonders of the World

More than 100 million people voted to choose the New Seven Wonders of the World. We put together a slideshow of the winners -- just in case you don't have time to visit them.

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You don't need to climb the 29,000 feet to the "Top of the World" to experience Mt. Everest's magnificence and beauty. 960 1280

  

Africa's stunning desert sand dunes have been shaped by over 4 billion years of geological activity. 960 1280

  

Costa Rica is home to one of the planet's most diverse ecosystems with a wide variety of habitats for wildlife. 960 1280

  

More than 1,000 miles of backcountry hiking trails through Yellowstone lead travelers to steaming, bubbling hot springs. 960 1280

  

The Great Barrier Reef is an underwater tropical paradise with amazing scuba diving and snorkeling. 960 1280

  

Visitors to Redwood National Park feel awestruck by the enormity of the tallest and oldest trees on Earth. 960 1280

  

The Galapagos Islands were named after the giant tortoises that bask on the sandy beaches. 960 1280

  

Ireland earns its nickname -- 'The Emerald Isle' -- thanks to its lush green pastures and clear blue lakes. 960 1280

  

Greenland provides the perfect backdrop for a true bonding experience with nature with stunning glaciers and icebergs. 960 1280

  

Gran Sabana, between Venezuela and Brazil, is dominated by tepuyes, flat-topped mountains with steep vertical walls. 960 1280

  

Multnomah Falls
Multnomah Falls

Multnomah Falls

Multnomah Falls, Oregon
After an ice storm, freezing cold water continues to plummet an impressive 620 feet into the Columbia River. Visitors can take in the spectacular view from the Benson Bridge, built in 1914 for scenes like this one.
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Yellowstone

Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Snow coats the ground around the Belgian Pool, a hot spring in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. You can look, but don't get too close! Originally named Oyster Spring, the natural wonder was renamed after a Belgian visitor who fell into it in 1929 and suffered fatal thermal burns.
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Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah
A snowy shot of Bryce Canyon's hoodoos, tall rock structures that form from water, wind and ice erosion.
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St. Joseph Lighthouse

St. Joseph Lighthouse

St. Joseph Lighthouses, Michigan
The St. Joseph Lighthouses attempt to withstand the elements on frozen Lake Michigan. The 2 lighthouses were built in the early 1900s, and the outer light is one of the oldest on the lake.
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Yosemite

Yosemite

Yosemite National Park, California
The setting sun illuminates El Capitan monolith in frozen Yosemite National Park. A favorite for advanced rock climbers, "The Chief" is the world's largest solid granite block, rising an awe-inspiring 3,500 feet above the ground.
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Coyote Butts

Coyote Butts

Coyote Buttes, Arizona
Jack Frost puts an icy touch on "The Wave," an incredible sandstone rock formation in Coyote Buttes North, a section of the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. In order to preserve the spectacular sight, only 20 hikers (with permits) per day are allowed to visit.
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Rennett Stowe through Flickr Creative Commons

Rennett Stowe through Flickr Creative Commons

Joshua Tree National Park, California
The sun rises over snow-clad Joshua trees in California's Mojave Desert.
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