Obama vs. Romney: Travel Showdown

As Obama and Romney near the election countdown, it’s time to answer the question: Who can lay claim to the better travel destinations? Let the debate begin with our city vs. city showdown.

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In 1963, nearly 300,000 protestors headed to the nation's capital for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which was a step in the right direction for passing the Civil Rights Act of1964. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his memorable 'I Have a Dream' speech at this spot on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington in 1963. 960 1280

Getty  

On March 30, 1965, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King led protestors in a march from Selma, AL, to the capitol in Montgomery to fight for black voting rights. 960 1280

Getty  

Martin Luther King Jr. slept in Room 306 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, TN, on the night before he was assassinated while standing on the hotel's balcony in 1968. 960 1280

Reuters  

The Lorraine Motel is now home to the National Civil Rights Museum, which chronicles the civil rights movement and provides opportunities to learn more about peace and justice in our world. 960 1280

Reuters  

Visitors pay their respects to Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King at the crypt at the King Center in Atlanta. 960 1280

Reuters  

Martin Luther King Jr. was the pastor at the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage in Montgomery, AL, between 1954 and 1960. Today, you can take a tour of the church and parsonage, both National Historic Landmarks. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Two great civil rights leaders are celebrated at the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Detroit. 960 1280

Reuters  

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati celebrates our country's civil rights heroes from the days of slavery and the Underground Railroad to modern times. 960 1280

Farshid Assassi/Assassi Productions  

In 1955, Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, refused to give up her seat on the bus for a white man. This action rocked the country and sparked another battle in the war for civil rights. Today, the public can step on the bus where it all began at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI. 960 1280

Getty  

The Rosa Parks Museum tells the tale of the 'victory ride' and the 381-day boycott of the Montgomery bus system that happened after Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on the bus. 960 1280

Getty  

Rosa Parks passed away in 2005 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Detroit. 960 1280

Getty  

Martin Luther King Jr. preached about nonviolence and peace from the pulpit of the original Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, which was across the street from the new sanctuary on the grounds of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site. 960 1280

  

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

In October 2011, after more than 2 decades of planning, the MLK Memorial opened in Washington, DC. Critics were unhappy with “drum major” quote abbreviation (pictured); the Department of Interior has since announced the quote will be removed. 960 1280

PBS NewsHour, flickr  

Sunset Strip

Sunset Strip

The mile-and-a-half stretch of Sunset Boulevard, better known as Sunset Strip, passes through West Hollywood, extending from Hollywood on Harper Avenue to Beverly Hills at Sierra Drive. 960 1280

Anna Bryukhanova/iStock.com  

Capitol Records Building

Capitol Records Building

The Capitol Records Tower, located in the Hollywood Boulevard commercial and entertainment district on Vine Street, was built in 1956, and is considered one of the city's historic landmarks. 960 1280

Dan Bannister/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images  

Hollywood Walk of Fame

Hollywood Walk of Fame

The Hollywood Walk of Fame, located near the Kodak Theatre, consists of more then 2,000 celebrity permanent public monuments (stars) on more than 15 blocks of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street. 960 1280

Gavin Hellier/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images  

The Viper Room

The Viper Room

The always-popular Viper Room nightclub on Sunset Strip, which opened in 1993, was once partly owned by Johnny Depp, and is infamous for the drug-related death of actor River Phoenix. 960 1280

Jim Steinfeldt/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images  

Kodak Theatre

Kodak Theatre

Located in the Hollywood and Highland Center shopping mall and entertainment complex on Hollywood Boulevard and North Highland Avenue, the Kodak Theatre was built in 2001 and is the first permanent home of the Academy Awards. 960 1280

Lucy Nicholson/AFP/Getty Images  

Hollywood Sign

Hollywood Sign

The iconic Hollywood Sign, which is about 45 feet high and 350 feet wide, was created in 1923. 960 1280

Tim Hawley  

Chateau Marmont

Chateau Marmont

Modeled after a French chateau in France's Loire Valley, the Chateau Marmont was built in 1927. Chateau Marmont has been referenced in songs, seen on album covers and has been a high-end place to crash for some of the biggest celebrity party animals. 960 1280

David Freund/iStock.com  

Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Located on the historic Hollywood Walk of Fame, Grauman's Chinese Theatre has played host to many of the biggest movie premieres. 960 1280

Hisham Ibrahim/Photolibrary/Getty Images  

Hand and Footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Hand and Footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Quite possibly the most revered "blonde" in history, Marilyn Monroe left her handprints in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre after the release of her movie Gentleman Prefer Blondes in 1953. 960 1280

Glowimages/Getty Images  

Hollywood Bowl

Hollywood Bowl

Seating almost 18,000 people, the Hollywood Bowl is the largest natural amphitheater in the US, and is set against the backdrop of the Hollywood Hills. 960 1280

Mathew Imaging/WireImage/Getty Images  

Rodeo Drive

Rodeo Drive

If shopping is what you fancy, there is no better place in Hollywood than Rodeo Drive. The 3-block stretch is lined with boutiques and shops: Versace, Prada and Jimmy Choo, to name a few. 960 1280

Izzet Keribar/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Paramount Studios

Paramount Studios

Founded in 1912, Paramount Studios on Melrose Avenue is America's oldest existing film studio and the only remaining major film studio in Hollywood.
960 1280

Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Hollywood Forever

Hollywood Forever

The Hollywood Forever Cemetery located on Santa Monica Boulevard is the final resting place for some of Hollywood's most talented. It was founded in 1899 and, on the verge of bankruptcy in 1998, was bought, restored and refurbished by Tyler Cassity of Forever Enterprises. It is still active today. 960 1280

Barry Winiker/Photolibrary/Getty Images  

The Beverly Hills Hotel

The Beverly Hills Hotel

Referred to by some as just "The Hotel," the Beverly Hills Hotel opened in 1912 as the first building in the greater area, and is partly responsible for the creation of the surrounding city of Beverly Hills.
960 1280

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images  

Mammoth Tragedy at La Brea Tar Pits

Mammoth Tragedy at La Brea Tar Pits

While excavating in the La Brea Tar Pits in order to build an underground parking garage for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art next door, a nearly intact woolly mammoth skeleton was discovered. It is now on display at George C. Page Museum on Wilshire Boulevard. 960 1280

Elizabeth W. Kearley/Moment Mobile/Getty Images  

Iconic Hollywood  15 Photos

Photos

In 1963, nearly 300,000 protestors headed to the nation's capital for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which was a step in the right direction for passing the Civil Rights Act of1964. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his memorable 'I Have a Dream' speech at this spot on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington in 1963. 960 1280

Getty  

On March 30, 1965, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King led protestors in a march from Selma, AL, to the capitol in Montgomery to fight for black voting rights. 960 1280

Getty  

Martin Luther King Jr. slept in Room 306 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, TN, on the night before he was assassinated while standing on the hotel's balcony in 1968. 960 1280

Reuters  

The Lorraine Motel is now home to the National Civil Rights Museum, which chronicles the civil rights movement and provides opportunities to learn more about peace and justice in our world. 960 1280

Reuters  

Visitors pay their respects to Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King at the crypt at the King Center in Atlanta. 960 1280

Reuters  

Martin Luther King Jr. was the pastor at the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage in Montgomery, AL, between 1954 and 1960. Today, you can take a tour of the church and parsonage, both National Historic Landmarks. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Two great civil rights leaders are celebrated at the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Detroit. 960 1280

Reuters  

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati celebrates our country's civil rights heroes from the days of slavery and the Underground Railroad to modern times. 960 1280

Farshid Assassi/Assassi Productions  

In 1955, Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, refused to give up her seat on the bus for a white man. This action rocked the country and sparked another battle in the war for civil rights. Today, the public can step on the bus where it all began at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI. 960 1280

Getty  

The Rosa Parks Museum tells the tale of the 'victory ride' and the 381-day boycott of the Montgomery bus system that happened after Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on the bus. 960 1280

Getty  

Rosa Parks passed away in 2005 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Detroit. 960 1280

Getty  

Martin Luther King Jr. preached about nonviolence and peace from the pulpit of the original Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, which was across the street from the new sanctuary on the grounds of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site. 960 1280

  

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

In October 2011, after more than 2 decades of planning, the MLK Memorial opened in Washington, DC. Critics were unhappy with “drum major” quote abbreviation (pictured); the Department of Interior has since announced the quote will be removed. 960 1280

PBS NewsHour, flickr