Signs of the City: LA

In the city of swimming pools and movie stars, check out the most famous icons, ranging from Disneyland to the Santa Monica Pier.

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Sunset Strip

Sunset Strip

The mile-and-a-half stretch of Sunset Boulevard, better known as Sunset Strip, passes through West Hollywood, extending from Hollywood on Harper Avenue to Beverly Hills at Sierra Drive. 960 1280

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Capitol Records Building

Capitol Records Building

The Capitol Records Tower, located in the Hollywood Boulevard commercial and entertainment district on Vine Street, was built in 1956, and is considered one of the city's historic landmarks. 960 1280

Dan Bannister/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images  

Hollywood Walk of Fame

Hollywood Walk of Fame

The Hollywood Walk of Fame, located near the Kodak Theatre, consists of more then 2,000 celebrity permanent public monuments (stars) on more than 15 blocks of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street. 960 1280

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The Viper Room

The Viper Room

The always-popular Viper Room nightclub on Sunset Strip, which opened in 1993, was once partly owned by Johnny Depp, and is infamous for the drug-related death of actor River Phoenix. 960 1280

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Kodak Theatre

Kodak Theatre

Located in the Hollywood and Highland Center shopping mall and entertainment complex on Hollywood Boulevard and North Highland Avenue, the Kodak Theatre was built in 2001 and is the first permanent home of the Academy Awards. 960 1280

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Hollywood Sign

Hollywood Sign

The iconic Hollywood Sign, which is about 45 feet high and 350 feet wide, was created in 1923. 960 1280

Tim Hawley  

Chateau Marmont

Chateau Marmont

Modeled after a French chateau in France's Loire Valley, the Chateau Marmont was built in 1927. Chateau Marmont has been referenced in songs, seen on album covers and has been a high-end place to crash for some of the biggest celebrity party animals. 960 1280

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Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Located on the historic Hollywood Walk of Fame, Grauman's Chinese Theatre has played host to many of the biggest movie premieres. 960 1280

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Hand and Footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Hand and Footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Quite possibly the most revered "blonde" in history, Marilyn Monroe left her handprints in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre after the release of her movie Gentleman Prefer Blondes in 1953. 960 1280

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Hollywood Bowl

Hollywood Bowl

Seating almost 18,000 people, the Hollywood Bowl is the largest natural amphitheater in the US, and is set against the backdrop of the Hollywood Hills. 960 1280

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Rodeo Drive

Rodeo Drive

If shopping is what you fancy, there is no better place in Hollywood than Rodeo Drive. The 3-block stretch is lined with boutiques and shops: Versace, Prada and Jimmy Choo, to name a few. 960 1280

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Paramount Studios

Paramount Studios

Founded in 1912, Paramount Studios on Melrose Avenue is America's oldest existing film studio and the only remaining major film studio in Hollywood.
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Hollywood Forever

Hollywood Forever

The Hollywood Forever Cemetery located on Santa Monica Boulevard is the final resting place for some of Hollywood's most talented. It was founded in 1899 and, on the verge of bankruptcy in 1998, was bought, restored and refurbished by Tyler Cassity of Forever Enterprises. It is still active today. 960 1280

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The Beverly Hills Hotel

The Beverly Hills Hotel

Referred to by some as just "The Hotel," the Beverly Hills Hotel opened in 1912 as the first building in the greater area, and is partly responsible for the creation of the surrounding city of Beverly Hills.
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Mammoth Tragedy at La Brea Tar Pits

Mammoth Tragedy at La Brea Tar Pits

While excavating in the La Brea Tar Pits in order to build an underground parking garage for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art next door, a nearly intact woolly mammoth skeleton was discovered. It is now on display at George C. Page Museum on Wilshire Boulevard. 960 1280

Elizabeth W. Kearley/Moment Mobile/Getty Images  

Iconic Hollywood  15 Photos

San Francisco Solano
Founded on July 4, 1823, by Father Jose Altimira, this historic mission was the site of the Bear Flag Revolt that led to the establishment of the California Republic in 1846.
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San Rafael Arcangel
This mission is located 20 miles north of San Francisco at the foot of Mount Tamalpais. It was established as a sanitarium and hospital for San Francisco neophytes suffering from depression and disease.
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San Francisco de Asis (Mission Dolores)
On a site selected by Juan Bautista de Anza, the first mission church was a 50-foot-long log and mud structure. It was eventually moved to higher ground, adjacent to Lake Dolores. The mission was dedicated to Saint Francis by Father Serra in 1776.
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Robert A. Estremo, Wikimedia Creative Commons  

San Jose
The most recent mission to have its church restored, the work truly captures the look and feel of 1830s prosperity. Founded in 1797 by Father Lasuen, the fertile site was chosen because of its view of Mission Dolores and Yerba Buena Island.
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Sanfranman59, Wikimedia Creative Commons  

Santa Clara de Asis
Located on the Guadeloupe River, the log chapel was founded in 1777 by Father Serra in honor of St. Clare. In 1851, work began which ultimately produced Santa Clara University as we know it today.
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Jaga, Wikimedia Creative Commons  

Santa Cruz
Although the soil was excellent and the location ideal, this mission never reached its potential. The dedication of Mission la Exaltacion de la Santa Cruz was made in 1791 by Father Lasuen, but the site was unfortunately located next to Branciforte pueblo, a community of ex-convicts and thieves.
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San Juan Bautista
Founded by Father Lasuen in 1797, this mission was unwittingly located directly above the San Andreas fault. Much of the original structure remains and has been restored. It's considered the largest California mission church and the only one with 3 aisles. It was named for John the Baptist.
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San Carlos Boorromeo de Carmelo
Founded by Father Serra in 1770 on Pentecost Sunday, this mission was considered to be his favorite. Both he and Father Lasuen are buried here. It served as the ecclesiastical capital of California, as well as Father Serra's headquarters for administrative duties as president of the missions.
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Didier B, Wikimedia Creative Commons  

Nuestra Senora de la Soledad
The padres named this mission for Our Lady of Solitude in 1791, which fits its isolated location. The rich soil and plentiful water helped the mission produce more than 100,000 bushels of wheat per year and raise nearly 17,000 head of livestock.
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San Antonio de Padua
Located 40 miles north of Paso Robles, this picturesque mission is nestled in the grasslands and oak trees of the San Antonio Valley. Named for a saint known as the "miracle worker," it was dedicated in 1771 by Father Serra. The church is known for its campanario and archway bells.
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San Miguel Arcangel
This mission was founded in 1797 by Father Lasuen. It completed the mission chain from San Luis Obispo to Mission Dolores in San Francisco. Located in the Salinas Valley, it was the mid point between the San Luis Obispo and San Antonio Missions. Under the direction of Esteban Munros, the Indians painted the walls and ceilings with ornate designs; the original murals are the best preserved in California today.
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Elf, Wikimedia Creative Commons  

San Luis Obispo de Tolosa
This humble chapel, built of logs, was dedicated to St. Louis, Bishop of Tolosa in 1772. It was the first mission to use tiles extensively on the roof due to repeated attacks by Indians who used flaming arrows to ignite the original thatched roof.
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La Purísima Concepción
Founded in 1787 by Father Lasuen, this mission is located 50 miles west of Santa Barbara. Considered to be the best example of mission architecture, it has 37 rooms that have been completely restored and furnished.
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Santa Ines
This mission was named for a 13-year-old Roman martyr, St. Agnes, who refused to sacrifice to the pagan gods in 304 AD. Santa Ines was dedicated in 1804 by Father Estevan Tapis. The museum contains a notable collection of vestments, church records and missals.
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Santa Barbara
Founded in 1786, the "Queen of the Missions" was the first to be christened by Father Lasuen and has continuously served as a parish church for the local population.
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San Buenaventura
The ninth mission in the chain was founded on Easter Sunday in 1782 by Father Serra and dedicated to St. Bonaventure. It was the last mission the humble priest would christen. Restored in 1957, the facade exhibits an unusual triangular design which opens onto the gardens.
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San Fernando Rey de Espana
Father Lasuen named this mission in honor of King Ferdinand III of Spain in 1797. Located 25 miles north of Los Angeles in the San Fernando Valley, the convent is the largest freestanding adobe in California and was originally used as a hospice for travelers.
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Geographer, Wikimedia Creative Commons  

San Gabriel Arcangel
Founded in 1771 by Junipero Serra, this fortress-like structure with 5-foot thick walls and narrow windows is a design not found in any other mission. One-fourth of the wealth of the California missions' in stock and grain was credited to San Gabriel.
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Wikimedia Creative Commons  

San Juan Capistrano
Named for Crusader Saint John of Capistrano and designed in the shape of a cross, this great stone church once consisted of 7 domes and a bell tower so tall it could be seen from 10 miles away.
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Ken Lund http://www.flickr.com/photos/kenlund  

San Luis Rey de Francia
Known as the "King of the Missions," San Luis Rey de Francia lies in a sheltered valley just east of Oceanside on State Highway 76. Named for Louis IX, the crusading King of France, the cross-shaped church was dedicated on the Feast of St. Anthony in 1798 by Father Lasuen.
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Geographer Wikimedia Creative Commons  

San Diego de Alcala
The mission trail in California began here on July 16, 1769, when Fathers Serra, Palou and Parron planted a large cross in the beachhead near the mouth of the San Diego River. A bell was suspended from a nearby tree, and the site was dedicated to St. Didacus.
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Map of all 21 missions along the coast of California, from San Francisco to San Diego. 960 1280

© 2011 Pentacle Press, www.missionscalifornia.com  


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