Street Performers Around the World

You've seen them: fire walkers, gold fixtures and levitators. From California to India, street performers make their living entertaining tourists and locals. Take a closer look at these modern marvels

Photos

1st Arrondissement: Louvre

1st Arrondissement: Louvre

The 1st arrondissement in Paris includes several notable tourist attractions. See the Mona Lisa and Venus de Milo at the world-renowned Louvre; visit the La Comedie-Francaise, where French playwright Moliere (aka Jean-Baptiste Poquelin) performed; go shopping at the Forum des Halles; explore the Conciergerie, where Queen Marie Antoinette was imprisoned; or just spend a relaxing day at the perfectly manicured Jardin des Tuileries.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

2nd Arrondissement: Bourse

2nd Arrondissement: Bourse

The historic headquarters of the Bourse de Paris (Paris Stock Exchange) and a branch of the National Library of France are located in the 2nd arrondissement, but the real star is Rue Montorgueil, one of the best open-market streets in the city. We suggest a stop by Galerie Vivienne (pictured), an indoor passage built in 1823 that features several shops, cafes and restaurants.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

3rd Arrondissement: Temple

3rd Arrondissement: Temple

The Marais neighborhood, also located in part of the 4th arrondissement, is a popular spot for hipsters and the LGBT community. Walk down Rue Dupetit-Thouars to see a small square called Place Nathalie Lemel, which was named after a French feminist who fought during the Commune de Paris in 1871. Looking for other things to do? Visit the Picasso Museum, the French National Archives and the Carnavalet Museum, which is dedicated to Paris’ history.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

4th Arrondissement: Hôtel de Ville

4th Arrondissement: Hôtel de Ville

Wake up in the morning with a view of Ile de la Cité from Ponts des Arts. In the Hôtel de Ville neighborhood, tourists can stroll through the streets of the Marais; check out modern art at the Centre Pompidou; take a tour of Notre Dame, the setting for Victor Hugo’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame; and see the author’s home -- located near Place des Vosges -- where he wrote Les Miserables. 960 1280

Jerome Treize  

5th Arrondissement: Pantheon

5th Arrondissement: Pantheon

In the 5th arrondissement, Rue Mouffetard is one of the oldest streets in the Latin Quarter. The famous Sorbonne University, the Pantheon and the Jardin des Plantes are also located here. History buffs may want to stop by the National Medieval Art Museum (Musee de Cluny) and the Roman-era coliseum, Arenes de Lutece.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

6th Arrondissement: Luxembourg

6th Arrondissement: Luxembourg

Welcome to the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood, which was named after the first president of the Paris Parliament in 1352.  You can’t leave this arrondissement without visiting the Luxembourg Museum and Gardens, as well as Le Procope, the oldest cafe in Paris. In addition, this area has several other cafes that are noted as regular spots for famous artists and writers. For example, Les Deux Magots was a regular hangout for Pablo Picasso and Ernest Hemingway.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

7th Arrondissement: Palais-Bourbon

7th Arrondissement: Palais-Bourbon

In 1674, Louis XIV opened Hôtel des Invalides (pictured) as a shelter to his soldiers. This neighborhood is also home to the Eiffel Tower, the tomb of French military and political leader Napoleon Bonaparte, and the Musee d’Orsay, which showcases artwork by famous artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Claude Monet. 960 1280

Jerome Treize  

8th Arrondissement: Élysée

8th Arrondissement: Élysée

Located in the center of Place Charles de Gaulle, the Arc de Triomphe is a must-see attraction if you’re visiting this neighborhood. The Champs-Elysees is lined with numerous cafes, upscale restaurants and high-end stores. Don’t hesitant to take a break from shopping to sit in the nearby gardens (Jardins des Champs-Elysees) or watch cars zip around Place de la Concorde.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

9th Arrondissement: Opéra

9th Arrondissement: Opéra

The centerpiece for the 9th arrondissement is the Palais Garnier, home of the Paris Opera. It was built by Charles Garnier from 1861 to 1875 and served as the inspiration for Gaston Leroux’s gothic love story, The Phantom of the Opera. If opera isn’t your thing, then visit the Olympia theater and concert hall, where French songstress Edith Piaf and other singers had historic performances. Visit the Musee Grevin (a wax museum); shop at Printemps department store; stroll through the Grand Boulevards neighborhood; or experience the Fragonard Musee du Parfum (a perfume museum). 960 1280

Jerome Treize  

10th Arrondissement: Entrepôt

10th Arrondissement: Entrepôt

Two of the city’s main railway stations are located here: Gare de l’Est and Gare du Nord. Don’t be scared off because this arrondissement is primarily a working-class area that attracts young professionals and artists. It’s actually a great place to grab a cup of coffee or a glass of wine to relax. In addition to having several cafes and restaurants, the Canal Saint-Martin neighborhood is a great place to have a picnic along the Seine; take a tour of the canal by boat; or rent a bike and explore this part of the city a different way. For music buffs, we suggest a visit to the famous Parisian jazz club New Morning to soothe your soul.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

11th Arrondissement: Popincourt

11th Arrondissement: Popincourt

Visit the 11th arrondissement, specifically the Oberkampf neighborhood, if you want to kick up your heels and dance into the wee hours of the morning. This area is known for its vibrant nightlife scene and its hip bars and clubs, such as Le Balajo. Place de la Bastille, which is shared with the 4th and 12th arrondissements, and the Edith Piaf Museum are a couple of other popular tourist attractions here.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

12th Arrondissement: Reuilly

12th Arrondissement: Reuilly

Port de l'Arsenal, a boat basin in Paris, was built where the former Bastille jail was once located. It’s also where Canal Saint-Martin and the Seine River connect. The Opera Bastille and the Bois de Vincennes are among the popular spots here. One of the city’s best restaurants, Le Train Bleu, is located in Gare de Lyon, a busy train station. After a nice meal, travelers can burn off a few calories on the Promenade Plantee, a 3-mile, tree-lined walkway built on the site of an old railway. This green space is what inspired New York City to build the High Line in Manhattan.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

13th Arrondissement: Gobelins

13th Arrondissement: Gobelins

A main square, between Rue de Tolbiac and Avenue d'Ivry, is one of several places in Chinatown used to host annual Chinese New Year celebrations in Paris. The huge residential area is also home to a branch of the National Library of France. Take a fun stroll along the cobblestone streets of the Butte aux Cailles’ art-deco architecture. It’s a quaint neighborhood and definitely one of the city’s hidden gems. 960 1280

Jerome Treize  

14th Arrondissement: Observatoire

14th Arrondissement: Observatoire

When visiting the 14th arrondissement, we suggest a stop along Villa Seurat, a private street with studios built in the 1920s and ’30s for artists such as sculptor Chana Orloff. American writer Henry Miller lived here while writing Tropic of Cancer. Walk around the City University campus or, if you’re feeling adventurous, take a tour of Paris’ mysterious underground catacombs, which are accessible from the Place Denfert-Rochereau.   960 1280

Jerome Treize  

15th Arrondissement: Vaugirard

15th Arrondissement: Vaugirard

Enjoy a brisk walk on Ile aux Cygnes, which is located near Quartier Beaugrenelle and the Eiffel Tower. Paris’ largest arrondissement (in both size and population) is also home to the Louis Pasteur Museum, Andre Citroen Park, Aquaboulevard (Europe’s largest water park) and Montparnasse Tower, arguably the best place to get amazing panoramic views of the city.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

16th Arrondissement: Passy

16th Arrondissement: Passy

The 16th arrondissement is home to several popular museums: Palais de Chaillot, which features architectural, naval and ethnographic museums; the Guimet Museum, which is known for its collection of Asian art; the Marmottan Monet Museum, which has the world’s largest collection of Claude Monet’s works; and the Palais de Tokyo, an edgy modern-art museum. For kids, we suggest a trip to the Jardin d’Acclimatation, an amusement park and garden.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

17th Arrondissement: Batignolles-Monceau

17th Arrondissement: Batignolles-Monceau

Rue des Batignolles is a street lined with stylish cafes and pricey boutiques. Looking for more to do in this area? Spend some quality time with someone special in the romantic Square des Batignolles; marvel at the crazy intersection at Place de Clichy and compare it to NYC’s Times Square; or enjoy a picnic at Parc Monceau, where there are a couple of playgrounds to keep the kids busy.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

18th Arrondissement: Butte-Montmartre

18th Arrondissement: Butte-Montmartre

In Montmartre, the Sacré Coeur Basilica offers wonderful views of the city. Check out a burlesque show at Moulin Rouge; experience Pigalle, the city’s racy red-light district; explore the Dali Museum, which is dedicated primarily to the sculptures and drawings of Salvador Dali; and get your portrait drawn by a local artist in the Place du Tertre.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

19th Arrondissement: Buttes-Chaumont

19th Arrondissement: Buttes-Chaumont

Built between 1813 and 1821, Canal de l'Ourcq goes from Paris to Mareuil-sur-Ourcq, a distance of about 55 miles. In addition to the canal, this arrondissement is home to 2 of the city’s most interesting parks: Parc des Buttes-Chaumont and Parc de la Villette.  960 1280

Jerome Treize  

20th Arrondissement: Ménilmontant

20th Arrondissement: Ménilmontant

This arrondissement is great for the contemplative tourist. Head to Parc de Belleville for a quiet respite to enjoy great views of Paris, or visit the Pere-Lachaise Cemetery to see where the Doors frontman Jim Morrison was buried. Music fans familiar with French singer Edith Piaf can also stop by the memorial dedicated to the eccentric songstress, who’s known for her famous tune La Vie en Rose. 960 1280

Jerome Treize  

Gothic Quarter

Gothic Quarter

Take a stroll through Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, located in the city’s Ciutat Vella (“Old City”) district. Most of the streets are closed to traffic, allowing tourists to wander from La Rambla to Via Laietana to view the city’s medieval past. 960 1280

Manfred Gottschalk/Lonely Planet Images  

Casa Batlló

Casa Batlló

You can’t leave Barcelona without admiring the amazing work of Spain’s most famous art nouveau architect, Antoni Gaudi. Casa Batlló, aka the House of Bones, was built in 1877 and later restored by Gaudi. 960 1280

Nikada/iStock/Getty Images  

Mercat de les Flors Theater

Mercat de les Flors Theater

Don’t miss out on stopping by the Mercat de les Flors Theater, located on Montjuic hill in Barcelona. Get a little culture and see one of many dance and musical performances featuring world-renowned international production companies. 960 1280

Enric Archivell, via CC-BY-NC-SA-2.0  

Christopher Columbus Monument

Christopher Columbus Monument

This monument is at the site where Christopher Columbus returned to Spain after his first trip to the Americas. 960 1280

Marcp_Dmoz/Moment Open/Getty Images  

Margarita Blue

Margarita Blue

Grab a drink at Margarita Blue, where you can check out live flamenco dancing, indulge in a jazz brunch or simply let the bar's DJs entertain you. 960 1280

Margarita Blue  

Frederic Marès Museum

Frederic Marès Museum

Step inside this medieval complex to see sculptor Frederic Marès’ eclectic collection of knickknacks, including religious art, 19th-century playing cards, toys, apothecary jars, a reconstructed Romanesque doorway with 4 arches, and old cameras. The Frederic Marès Museum is sure to keep your attention focused on its wide array of interesting curios. 960 1280

DEA / C. MAURY, Getty Images  

La Boqueria

La Boqueria

Dating back as far as 1217, La Boqueria Market is one of Barcelona’s most popular tourist attractions. Dozens of vendors inside this large public market sell a variety of goods, including seafood, poultry, charcuterie, vegetables and fruits. 960 1280

Hiroshi Higucchi/Getty Images  

La Comercial

La Comercial

Go shopping at La Comercial in Barcelona’s El Born neighborhood. With 6 different boutiques, this shopping mall has a wide selection of international labels, jewelry and fragrances, such as Michael Kors, Fred Perry, Yohji Yamamoto, Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen. 960 1280

La Comercial  

Lailo

Lailo

Attention, shoppers! Make a stop at Lailo in Barcelona’s Ciutat Vella district if you enjoy browsing for vintage clothing. 960 1280

Geo Kalev  

Onofre

Onofre

Grab a glass of wine and enjoy Onofre’s cozy atmosphere. This restaurant’s specialty is pairing menu items — tapas, cheeses, salads and sausages — with your selection of wine. 960 1280

Onofr Tavern  

Monastery of Pedralbes

Monastery of Pedralbes

Founded by the Queen Elisenda de Montcada, the Monastery of Pedralbes is now a museum that houses religious art and everyday items used in the monastery from the 14th to 20th centuries. Take a relaxing, casual stroll through the gardens and courtyard if you have time. 960 1280

Elena Solodovnikova/iStock/Getty Images  

Tibidabo Amusement Park

Tibidabo Amusement Park

The 100-year-old Tibidabo Amusement Park has 25 rides, plus restaurants and picnic areas for family fun. Make sure to check out the Tibidabo Sky Walk for the best views of Barcelona.  960 1280

Boule13/iStock/Getty Images  

Sagrada Familia Basilica

Sagrada Familia Basilica

You cannot leave Barcelona without seeing the Basilica de la Sagrada Familia, a magnificent work of art that is still in progress after more than a century. In 1883, Antoni Gaudi was commissioned to complete the project started by Francisco de Paula del Villar. Gaudi finished the chapel of San Jose, the crypt and the Nativity facade, but after his death, different architects continued to work on and add to his original idea. 960 1280

Wangkun Jia/iStock/Getty Images  

Park Güell

Park Güell

Another example of Antoni Gaudi's work, Park Güell, is located on Carmel Hill and was built between 1900 and 1914. It was declared a UNESECO World Heritage Site in 1984. 960 1280

Jean-Pierre Lescourret/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Magic Fountain of Montjuic

Magic Fountain of Montjuic

Hundreds of people converge on Montjuic hill to watch the amazing light and water show at the Magic Fountain of Montjuic. Classical, modern and movie music was incorporated into the light show in the 1980s. Arrive early to claim the perfect spot, and make sure you wear waterproof gear if you’re standing near the fountain. Check out the website for performance times.  960 1280

Krysztof Dydynski/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya

Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya

Located in the Palau Nacional of Montjuic, the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya opened its doors with a large medieval Romanesque collection. Today, visitors can see other art collections, including Gothic art, Renaissance and baroque art, Catalan modernism and photography. 960 1280

Philip Lange/iStock/Getty Images  

Barcelona Zoo

Barcelona Zoo

The Barcelona Zoo was once home to Snowflake, the only known albino gorilla, who died in 2003. Now, giant anteaters, Bornean orangutans, Iberian wolves, Humboldt penguins, Cuban boas, Komodo dragons and yellow and blue poison dart frogs are a few animals that call this zoo home. 960 1280

Hiroyuki Matsumoto/Getty Images  

Aquarium Barcelona

Aquarium Barcelona

Explore marine life and go scuba diving with sharks in the Oceanarium, which is also home to moray eels and ocean sunfish. Visitors to the Aquarium Barcelona — the largest Mediterranean-themed aquarium in the world — can see more than 3,000 fish and watch zookeepers up-close as they feed sharks, stingrays and penguins. 960 1280

Artur Debat/Moment Mobile/Getty Images  

Camp Nou

Camp Nou

Visit Camp Nou, the stadium where Futbol Club Barcelona (also known as Barca) plays its home soccer games. While you’re there, take a tour of the FCB Museum and step back in time to see the history of Barca unfold via touch-screen TVs, championship trophies and Messi Space, a place dedicated to superstar soccer player Leo Messi. 960 1280

Jose Jordan/AFP/Getty Images  

11 Photos
Generalife Gardens (Granada)

Generalife Gardens (Granada)

Schedule some extra time to stroll through the Generalife’s High and Low Gardens. Take the 19th-century Stairway of the Lions to the High Gardens, and see water fountains, beautiful magnolia trees, scented shrubs and other flora spread across several terraces on the palatial estate. Tourists may be lucky enough to catch the Granada International Festival of Music and Dance, held each summer in the Generalife’s outdoor amphitheater, located nearby. 960 1280

Ivan Bastien/iStock/Getty Images  

Prado Museum (Madrid)

Prado Museum (Madrid)

Open since November 1819, the Prado Museum houses several collections and more than 2,300 paintings, including El Greco’s The Flight to Egypt and Goya’s The Countess of Chinchon. The museum hosts exhibitions featuring works by well-renowned artists such as Michelangelo, Picasso and Rembrandt.
960 1280

Emad Aljumah/Moment/Getty Images  

Plaza Mayor (Madrid)

Plaza Mayor (Madrid)

Thousands of tourists converge on Plaza Mayor each year. Shops and cafes are located around the square, and it’s not uncommon to see street performers entertaining the foot traffic that’s flowing through the popular tourist destination. Grab a seat, order a pitcher of sangria and enjoy the weather and people-watching. 960 1280

StockstudioX/Vetta/Getty Images  

Sagrada Familia Basilica (Barcelona)

Sagrada Familia Basilica (Barcelona)

You cannot leave Barcelona without seeing the Basilica de la Sagrada Familia, a magnificent work of art that is still in progress after more than a century. In 1883, Spanish architect Antoni Gaudi was commissioned to complete the project started by Francisco de Paula del Villar. Gaudi finished the chapel of San Jose, the crypt and the Nativity facade, but after his death, different architects continued to work on and add to his original idea. 960 1280

Wangkun Jia/iStock/Getty Images  

Gothic Quarter (Barcelona)

Gothic Quarter (Barcelona)

Take a stroll through Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, located in the city’s Ciutat Vella (“Old City”) district. Most of the streets are closed to traffic, allowing tourists to wander from La Rambla to Via Laietana to view the city’s medieval past. 960 1280

Manfred Gottschalk/Lonely Planet Images/ Getty Images  

Horchata (Valencia)

Horchata (Valencia)

Travel to Valencia, the home of horchata. This tasty concoction — made from tigernuts, water and sugar — is a summer beverage that is usually served cold. To sample your first horchata, head to Horchateria Santa Catalina, which is located in Valencia’s Santa Catalina Plaza. 960 1280

Bhofack2/iStock/Getty Images  

Valencian Paella (Valencia)

Valencian Paella (Valencia)

During the mid-19th century, paella originated near the Albufera lagoon in Valencia. Locals and tourists can try seafood paella, mixed paella or Valencian paella, which is made with white rice, green vegetables, chicken, rabbit, land snails, beans and seasoning. We recommend sampling paella at a local restaurant such as La Matandeta, La Pepica or Tridente Restaurant. 960 1280

Azmanl/iStock/Getty Images  

Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba (Cordoba)

Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba (Cordoba)

Tourists who visit Cordoba, Spain, should add a tour of the Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba — also known simply as the Great Mosque-Cathedral — to their must-do list. On the site originally was a Catholic church, which was then divided into Christian and Muslim halves after the Muslims conquered Spain in 711. Caliph ’Abd al-Rahman I purchased the Christian half, tore down the church and built the current magnificent structure, a monument to Moorish architecture, in 784. Today, it is a Roman Catholic cathedral, despite the pleas from Spanish Muslim lobbyists who want to be allowed to pray there. 960 1280

Perseomed/iStock/Getty Images  

Alhambra (Granada)

Alhambra (Granada)

Visit the Alhambra, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Granada. During the 13th century, this palace and fortress was the residence of the Nasrid sultans, as well as top government officials, court servants and the royal guard. Hidden by a thick wooded area, the Alhambra consists of 4 zones: the palaces, the military zone, the city and the villa of the Generalife, located on the country estate of the Nasrid emirs. 960 1280

Lenoriux/iStock/Getty Images  

Plaza de Espana (Seville)

Plaza de Espana (Seville)

Does Seville’s Plaza de Espana look familiar? The square — located on the edge of Maria Luisa Park — has been used as a filming location for movies such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Dictator, Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace and Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones. Designed by Anibal Gonzalez, the Plaza de Espana has tiled alcoves that each represent a different province of Spain. Today, it is home to museums and government buildings. 960 1280

Geography Photos/Universal Images Group/Getty Images  

The Alcazar (Seville)

The Alcazar (Seville)

The upper levels of the Alcazar of Seville are home to the royal family, making it the oldest European royal palace still in use. The Alcazar was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987, and it is well-renowned as one of the most beautiful palaces in Spain. Explore the history of this amazing complex for a small entrance fee, about $10. 960 1280

Getty Images/Nicole Thonon  

The Hot List

Explore America’s most stunning scenery.
Join the conversation on Social Media!
Stay updated on the latest travel tips and trends.
Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.