Street Performers Around the World

You've seen them: fire walkers, gold fixtures and levitators. From California to India, street performers make their living entertaining tourists and locals. Take a closer look at these modern marvels

Photos

Take a look at this nostalgic sign from when the Paris Metro first opened in 1900 for the World's Fair. Today it is the second busiest train system in the world. The official name is Compagnie du chemin de fer metropolitain de Paris. Try saying that fast a couple times. 960 1280

  

It's never a good idea to kidnap children, but this sign is posted in Paris just in case there's any doubt. 960 1280

  

Heading to the Arc de Triomphe? Walk through the underground tunnel to avoid the hectic traffic on the Champs-Élysées. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Your trip to Paris isn't complete without seeing the Notre Dame Cathedral. You may get a glimpse of the infamous hunchback Quasimodo. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

This Champs-Élysées Avenue sign is perfect for shopping aficionados. It's a clear indication that Paris' strip of boutiques and commercial stores, including Nike and Haagen Dazs, are just a few feet ahead. 960 1280

  

Are the seeing-impaired or blind really going to notice this crosswalk signal specifically designed for them? Well the likelihood that they'll see it is really slim. 960 1280

  

Here's another retro Metro sign, which marks and entrance and exit to Paris' labyrinth of train lines. 960 1280

Photographer: Bert Heydel  

As a word of caution or interest, you're strolling through Paris' infamous red-light district or the Pigalle neighborhood if you see several signs like this one. 960 1280

unknown  

It's clear! No bikes, motorcycles or mopeds are allowed near the Eiffel Tower, one of Paris' biggest tourist attractions. 960 1280

  

Cross the street with caution! Hundreds of cars race through Place Charles de Gaulle aka Place de l'Etoile, a traffic circle and meeting point for 12 avenues, including the Champs-Élysées. 960 1280

Hemera Technologies  

This traffic sign has a universal message no matter where you're traveling around the world. It's a tow-away zone in Paris; so, make sure you avoid parking nearby. 960 1280

  

We're puzzled by this 'night and day' sign. So does this mean that there's are no days or nights in Paris. It's confusing, right? 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Get your can-can on at the well-renowned Moulin Rouge, located in Pigalle or Paris' red-light district. 960 1280

  

We thought that old-school detective offices were a thing of the past, but this 1930s-style neon sign marks the location of the well-known Duluc Detective Agency on the Rue de Louvre. It looks like they're open for business. 960 1280

  

Hampstead Garden Suburb

Hampstead Garden Suburb

Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor was born to American parents in this northwest London suburb in February 1932. The youngest of 2 children, Taylor’s beauty was apparent early on. A mutation gave Taylor double eyelashes, and people would stop to behold her deep blue eyes, which appeared violet. 960 1280

Steve Cadman, flickr   

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Shortly before the start of World War II, Taylor’s parents returned to the US to avoid hostilities. Settling in Los Angeles, Taylor’s father established an art gallery, which soon attracted numerous Hollywood celebrities. This A-list crowd couldn’t help but notice the young Taylor’s beauty, and a star would soon be born. 960 1280

iStock   

San Joaquin River

San Joaquin River

One of Taylor’s earliest films, Lassie Come Home was filmed partly on location around the San Joaquin River. The largest river in central California, the 366-mile-long tributary was the setting for the 1943 film’s dramatic rapids scene. 960 1280

jcookfisher, flickr   

Pebble Beach, California

Pebble Beach, California

A year later, Taylor became a full-fledged star with the release of National Velvet. Much of the film was shot in this small coastal resort destination in California, which owes much of its picture-perfect scenery to granite rock outcroppings visible along the coast. 960 1280

iStock   

All Saints Episcopal Church

All Saints Episcopal Church

At 18, Taylor snagged her first adult role, in Father of the Bride. In the 1950 film, Taylor (as Kay Banks) walks down the aisle of this church at 504 North Camden Drive in Beverly Hills. In real life, Taylor married hotel heir Conrad Hilton the same year -- in what would be the first of her 8 marriages. 960 1280

Tony Hoffarth, flickr   

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

A dual citizen of the UK and US (the latter from 1977 on), Taylor visited London many times. She even appeared in a CBS TV special Elizabeth Taylor in London in 1963, taking viewers on a tour of various sites, including Westminster Bridge, Battersea Park and the House of Parliament. Here’s Taylor more than a decade earlier, at the age of 16, with a friend in Trafalgar Square. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Cascade Lake, California

Cascade Lake, California

This 170-foot-deep glacial lake was the backdrop for 1951’s A Place in the Sun. With luminous closeups of her perfectly symmetrical face, Taylor played American socialite Angela Vickers, the unattainable dream girl to the poor nephew of a rich industrialist. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Marfa, Texas

Marfa, Texas

This dusty town in West Texas was the site of 2 months of filming for the 1956 movie Giant, in which Taylor played socialite Leslie Lynnton. The town is also famous for the Marfa lights, visible on clear nights between Marfa and the Paisano Pass when facing southwest. 960 1280

Paul Lowry, flickr   

Oyster Bay, Long Island

Oyster Bay, Long Island

Two years later, Taylor had another hit with Cat on a Hat Tin Roof, the film adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ play. The film was shot in the town of Oyster Bay on Long Island. During filming, the 26-year-old Taylor suffered the loss of her third husband Mike Todd, who was killed in a plane crash. 960 1280

Hitchster, flickr   

S'Agaro, Spain

S'Agaro, Spain

Taylor signed on for another film adaption of a Tennessee Williams play. In Suddenly, Last Summer, Taylor played a young woman institutionalized for severe emotional disturbance. The film’s "Cabeza de Lobo" sequence was partly shot in this resort area (pictured), located in the coastal region of northeastern Spain. 960 1280

Freebird, flickr   

Fifth Avenue, NYC

Fifth Avenue, NYC

Taylor won her first Academy Award for her portrayal of part-model, part-call girl Gloria Wondrous in 1960’s Butterfield 8. Much of the film’s action occurred on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, including Fifth Avenue. By now, Taylor had married her fourth husband, Eddie Fisher, and proclaimed: “We’re house-hunting New Yorkers. Our home is here now, not in Hollywood.” 960 1280

iStock   

Rome

Rome

Liz and Dick -- the world’s most famous couple of the day met on the set of 1963’s Cleopatra. Playing the most beautiful woman of ancient times, Taylor was not to be outdone in real life: During filming in Rome, Taylor and the married actor began a very public affair. Four years later, the headline-grabbing couple returned to Italy to film The Taming of the Shrew. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Ritz Carlton, Montreal

Ritz Carlton, Montreal

After quickie divorces in Mexico from their spouses, Liz and Dick tied the knot in Montreal in 1964. The civil ceremony took place at the Ritz-Carlton hotel on 1228 Sherbrooke Street West, in the city’s luxurious Golden Square Mile area. It was Taylor’s fifth marriage, and Burton’s second. 960 1280

Ron Starr of Ron Starr Photography  

Liz and Dick's Wedding

Liz and Dick's Wedding

"I'm so happy you can't believe it,” beamed the newly married Taylor. “This marriage will last forever." Maybe not exactly, but it did prove to be Taylor’s greatest love affair. Liz and Dick’s marriage lasted 10 years; 16 months after their divorce, they married again, before finally divorcing a short time later, this time for good. 960 1280

Getty Images   

Smith College

Smith College

Elizabeth Taylor wowed the critics with her electrifying portrayal of Martha in 1966’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? The film was shot on location at Smith College in Northampton, MA, and earned Taylor her second Academy Award for Best Actress. 960 1280

cogito ergo imago, flickr   

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

In 1985, Taylor lost her longtime friend (and Giant costar) Rock Hudson to AIDS. That same year, Taylor cofounded the American Foundation for AIDS Research, and in 1986 went to Capitol Hill to testify before the Senate about the need for greater funding and public awareness of the disease. 960 1280

Thinkstock   

The Western Wall

The Western Wall

Taylor converted to Judaism at the age of 27, taking the name "Elisheba Rachel.” She went on to become a lifelong supporter of Israel, and visited the Western Wall in August 1975 with Richard Burton. Taylor returned to the country in 1982, meeting with Israeli leader Menachem Begin. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace

Paying homage to Taylor’s British roots, Buckingham Palace bestowed its highest honor on the star in 2000. That year, Taylor was named a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II. 960 1280

iStock   

Hawaii Shark Dive

Hawaii Shark Dive

At 74, Taylor proved she hadn’t lost her passion for life. Having survived a brain tumor nearly a decade earlier, Taylor enjoyed a shark-diving trip in Hawaii. "There were 12 sharks cruising the cage!" Taylor later told People. "The water was very warm. It was beautiful. I had a T-shirt on that said 'Shark Bait.'" 960 1280

Thinkstock  

The Abbey, Los Angeles

The Abbey, Los Angeles

In her final years, Taylor was a once-a-week regular at The Abbey, a gay bar in West Hollywood, CA. She’d enjoy tequila shots, watermelon and apple martinis, and wave to fans from her wheelchair. After her death, the bar staff left a remembrance to Taylor on an empty table: a Blue Velvet martini, made with vodka and blueberry schnapps, in a nod to Taylor’s 1944 film National Velvet. 960 1280

Getty Images   

14 Photos
Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

New Orleans native Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong (1900 - 1971) was a great jazz trumpeter and 'scat' vocalist who was one of the first popular African-American entertainers to 'cross-over' -- skin-color was secondary to his amazing talent during a time when America was severely racially divided. 960 1280

Keystone/Getty Images  

Cajun Music

Cajun Music

Cajun music, rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada, started in New Orleans. Popular groups including Hadley J. Castille Family & the Sharecroppers Cajun Band, seen performing at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, keep this unique style of music alive. 960 1280

Rick Diamond/Getty Images  

NOLA Native Harry Connick, Jr.

NOLA Native Harry Connick, Jr.

Musician and actor Harry Connick Jr., performs on the piano at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. The New Orleans native has 7 top-20 US albums, and 10 number-1 US jazz albums, earning more number-1 albums than any other artist in the US jazz chart history. 960 1280

REUTERS/Lee Celano  

Bourbon Street's Live Music Venues

Bourbon Street's Live Music Venues

Revelers walk along Bourbon Street in the French Quarter during New Orleans annual Mardi Gras, which features numerous bands and singers at popular establishments, including Bourbon Street Blues Company, The Eagle Saloon, Club 300 Jazz Restaurant, Funky Pirate, Old Opera House and House of Blues. 960 1280

Patrick Semansky/Getty Images  

Zydeco Music

Zydeco Music

A Zydeco band plays in a bar along Bourbon Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans, LA. Zydeco music was originally created at house dances, where families and friends gathered for socializing. It evolved from forms of Creole music, and it is usually characterized as fast-tempo music, dominated by the piano accordion and a form of washboard. 960 1280

Joe Raedle/Getty Images  

Birthplace of Jazz

Birthplace of Jazz

New Orleans is also home to many notable musicians who played pivotal role jazz music, including Ferdinand Joseph La Menthe aka Jelly Roll Morton (1885 - 1941), an American ragtime jazz musician and songwriter. There are numerous claims that Morton invented jazz in 1902. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Voodoo Music Experience

Voodoo Music Experience

Trent Reznor, frontman for the music group Nine Inch Nails, performs at the annual Voodoo Music Experience concert held at Riverview Park in New Orleans. New Orleans plays host to numerous music festivals each year, including the Rock `n' Roll Marathon, Mardi Gras, Bayou Boogaloo, Crescent City Blues & BBQ Festival, Soul Fest, Southern Decadence, Words & Music and the Essence Festival. 960 1280

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson  

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival

Buckwheat Zydeco (on the right) performs at the Fair Grounds during the annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival in New Orleans. The festival features hundreds of musical acts on more than ten stages. 960 1280

REUTERS/David Rae Morris  

The Queen of Gospel

The Queen of Gospel

American gospel singer Mahalia Jackson (1911 - 1972) was born in the Carrollton neighborhood of Uptown New Orleans. She was referred to as 'The Queen of Gospel,' and she became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world. 960 1280

Keystone/Getty Images  

Mickey's Next Club

Mickey's Next Club

Mickey's Next Club is a popular hangout among residents during Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Rock `n' Bowl and Margaritaville, owned by singer/songwriter Jimmy Buffett, are couple places music lovers can go to hear all types of music, including jazz, blues, Zydeco, southern rock and Cajun. 960 1280

Mario Tama/Getty Images  

Better than Ezra lead singer Kevin Griffin performs during the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. New Orleans has been the breeding ground for new talent and artists from different genres, including rap artists Lil' Wayne and Master P, and alternative rock band Better Than Ezra, who all hail from the Crescent City. 960 1280

Sean Gardner/Getty Images  

A family that plays together stays together. Jazz musician Wynton Marsalis performs with his brothers, Delfeayo (L) and Branford, during a concert at Lakefront Arena in New Orleans. The Marsalis family, well-renowned as solo jazz artists in their own rite, reaped the benefits of living in a city with a rich music history. 960 1280

Reuters/David Rae Morris  

New Orleans rhythm and blues legend Fats Domino performs at the 30th Annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage. 960 1280

Reuters/Lee Celano  

We couldn't forget about jazz funerals in New Orleans. Derived from African spiritual practices, this cultural tradition is a funeral procession that includes the family and friends of the deceased person, who, in most cases, had some connection to the music industry. A brass band usually starts with somber hymns, but after the deceased is buried or the hearse leaves the procession, they transition to playing upbeat music. 960 1280

Getty Images  

The Hot List

Explore America’s most stunning scenery.
Join the conversation on Social Media!
Stay updated on the latest travel tips and trends.
Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.