10 NYC Restaurants You Have to Try

A Travel Channel editor picks her high-end to affordable favorites in New York City right now.

Bevy Eclairs

Bevy Eclairs

The whimsical eclair plate at New York's Bevy.

Photo by: Kate June Burton

Kate June Burton

The whimsical eclair plate at New York's Bevy.

Related To:

Whether tucked into 5-star hotels or in the hipster depths of the East Village, these hidden gems are worth the trip to experience some of the city’s best, most innovative food. Whether you are in the mood for an atmospheric French boite or a trip further afield to a Long Island City gem, these picks will keep you busy on your next trip to NYC.

Tuome Restaurant Chicken Dish

Tuome Restaurant Chicken Dish

Chicken and porridge at Tuome.

Photo by: Noah Fecks/Tuome

Noah Fecks/Tuome

Chicken and porridge at Tuome.

1: Tuome

Prepare to have your mind blown with Tuome's combination of ambiance, food and a heavy infusion of hip at this stealth spot that has garnered raves from Zagat, The New York Times and Eater. Tuome is fine dining with an East Village rock-and-roll edge and a playlist of Tom Petty, Zeppelin and the Stones that make it feel like a party at your coolest friend’s apartment.

Chef Thomas Chen

Chef Thomas Chen

Chef Thomas Chen

Photo by: Tuome

Tuome

Chef Thomas Chen

Laid back but on-his-game accountant-turned-chef Thomas Chen is all about white-table touches but with a hip, unpretentious vibe and a memorable mix of food blending Chinese and contemporary American influences. The servers know their stuff but seem more like the coolest people in your yoga class than the typical overexplanatory foodie fetishists. Like so much at this creative, intimate spot, disadvantages become advantages: the lack of a liquor license doesn’t keep Tuome from concocting some of the most incredible wine and sake-based cocktails around. Fire in the Sky rivals any mixology-centric bar’s craft cocktail star, a spicy mix of sake, Thai chili and yuzu juice for the perfect balance of spice and sweetness.

Fire in the Sky Cocktail at Tuome

Fire in the Sky Cocktail at Tuome

The Fire in the Sky cocktail

Photo by: Tuome

Tuome

The Fire in the Sky cocktail

Deviled Eggs at Tuome

Deviled Eggs at Tuome

Deviled egg, Tuome style.

Photo by: Noah Fecks

Noah Fecks

Deviled egg, Tuome style.

You’ll want to start with the kind of appetizer that quickly knocks that chip off your shoulder about having tried every variation of a deviled egg under the sun. Chen’s egg white is panko-coated and deep fried, full of umami and not to be missed. A bowl of sautéed eggplant elevates this ubiquitous veg to new heights and octopus served with a kind of brown butter and potato mousse siphoned out tableside is an opportunity to congratulate Chen for his work in person. An Asian-infused comfort dish, the chicken with porridge in a savory berth of rice is congee-meets-risotto heaven. There’s only one dessert on offer (sweets are not Chen’s thing): Chinese beignets. I highly recommend you go for it even if dessert is not your thing; this is a supremely decadent take on beignets with a goat’s milk caramel sauce served in a squeeze bottle to make you master-of-your-own-portion and a smear of tart citron marmalade to cut the milky sugar rush.

Tuome Dining Room

Tuome Dining Room

The laid-back Tuome dining room.

Photo by: Paul Wagtouicz

Paul Wagtouicz

The laid-back Tuome dining room.

2: Bevy

Monkfish at Bevy

Monkfish at Bevy

Monkfish at Bevy

Photo by: Kate June Burton

Kate June Burton

Monkfish at Bevy

The perfect sophisticated, polished setting for drinks and small bites before a concert at Carnegie Hall or a romantic dinner for two, Bevy and The Living Room bar tucked inside the upstairs lobby level of the elegant Central Park South 5-star Park Hyatt are my new favorites for NYC drinks and dining. Both spots put a premium on attentive but never fussy service in a refined setting enriched by great art. A kinetic piece by Random International “Swarm” hangs over the bar at Bevy, striking a note of smart, cosmopolitan opulence.

Sphinx of Savoy Cocktail at Park Hyatt

Sphinx of Savoy Cocktail at Park Hyatt

Sphinx of Savoy cocktail at the Living Room bar.

Photo by: Kate June Burton

Kate June Burton

Sphinx of Savoy cocktail at the Living Room bar.

Start your evening with one of the craft cocktails at swanky Living Room bar, which rivals any Manhattan cocktail destination. Then proceed to Bevy, the kind of spot that feels like an insider secret, where moody lighting and intimate tables tucked away into quiet corners make everyone feel like a VIP. It’s a romantic, slow-burn space where service is well-oiled, unobtrusive and perfectionist without being overbearing. 

Chef Chad Brauze at Bevy

Chef Chad Brauze at Bevy

Bevy chef Chad Bauze

Photo by: Melissa Hom

Melissa Hom

Bevy chef Chad Bauze

Chef Chad Brauze is a fine-dining maestro with a cutting-edge sensibility and a particular master of the kind of veg-centric dishes that other chefs consider secondary players to protein stars. The farm stand is Brauze’s muse. This is a man who aggressively sources new heirloom vegetables and treats them with the respect they deserve. Seasonality dictates the vegetable offerings, but if you can catch the charred leaks with anchovy and a smart spin on the classic horiataki salata with perfect heirloom tomatoes and a Kalamata tapenade, count yourself lucky. Typical of Brauze’s innovative approach is a toothsome, so-fresh-it-crunches corn in bearnaise sauce bursting with a wonderful blend of farmers’ market freshness and French decadence, like your grandmother’s favorite summer dish gussied up for the debutante ball. The Yelp masses have spoken, and the decadent fried lemon oyster mushrooms full of incredible depth of flavor are reason enough to just grab a glass of wine and experience culinary heaven. Lamb merguez served with a poached egg and a thin, garlicky slice of bread is full of rich, gamey Mediterranean flavors, the intensity of the sausage wonderfully counterbalanced by the tang of yogurt. Mains are nothing to sneeze at either, including the monk fish; an ethereal blend of earthy legume and delicate, perfectly executed fish.

Bevy Oyster Mushrooms

Bevy Oyster Mushrooms

Lemon oyster mushrooms at Bevy.

Photo by: Melissa Hom

Melissa Hom

Lemon oyster mushrooms at Bevy.

Pastry chef Scott Cioe is known for his exquisite desserts including a classic, old-world Pavlova with savory elements amplified in an olive oil Chantilly. A plate of small eclairs with whimsical flavors like pineapple upside down cake and birthday cake show a definite sense of humor even within this very refined setting. Bevy is a restaurant that takes dining very seriously in a gorgeous setting, but that never lets you forget food’s surprise-factor. Bevy casts a spell that lingers as you step out into the night and even this already magical city glows with a special enchantment.

Bevy Dining Room

Bevy Dining Room

The Bevy bar with Random International's artwork "Swarm."

Photo by: Kate June Burton

Kate June Burton

The Bevy bar with Random International's artwork "Swarm."

3: Neta

A tiny but very memorable sushi spot in the West Village, Neta is destination-dining for sushi lovers. The plain exterior and unassuming minimalism inside can fool you into thinking this is a run-of-the-mill spot. But perfectionism is a constant here, with attentive service and extraordinary care in preparation and ingredients to justify the high prices. Sit at the counter for the best view of the precise work done in the kitchen helmed by a slew of chefs and a very attentive manager working in impressive coordination considering the cramped space. The omakase menu is recommended for the variety of surprising, unique, perfectly harmonized dishes. Menu highlights include a refreshing daikon salad that operates as a palate cleanser between the succulent seafood dishes or as a refreshing starter. The nama yuba seafood salad is a thrilling play of textures and flavors with scallop, crab and salmon all in the mix and the toro tartar and osetra caviar with grilled toast is the kind of jewel-of-the-sea richness that makes you sad when it’s gone. By all means don’t miss the exceptional uni porridge: a blend of highbrow ingredients and lowbrow comfort. And though we didn’t try it, our very animated waiter, a kind of humorous sidekick to the communion-serious chefs, said the fried chicken was his favorite. Next time.

4: Boucherie

Like being transported to Paris, this atmospheric West Village bistro is a great pick for some beloved French classics and wood-fired steaks. Boucherie chef Jerome Dihui is a veteran of another classic NYC French restaurant, Pastis and the Art Nouveau aesthetics here are a mix of bistro standards with a grand New York twist. The cavernous space features a traditional behind-the-bar mirror that has gone Times Square supersized and the exposed duct work gives the spot-on Francophile space (including the requisite tiny tables) an industrial vibe. An impressive selection of house cocktails centered on absinthe do justice to this idiosyncratic licorice spirit. Nailing that uniquely French blend of perfect, fresh ingredients and an artist’s touch, the salade d’auvergne with candied walnuts, a piquant Fourme d’Ambert and delicate greens is a memorably bright starter along with a well-executed steak tartare topped with a tiny quail egg. The trout almandine and steak frites au poivre are just the kind of solid renditions you’d expect at a high-end Paris bistro. The buzzing crowd both inside and at the café tables on the sidewalk make you feel in the center of the action.

5: Casa Enrique

An unexpected Michelin-star rated, postage-stamp sized Mexican restaurant in Long Island City—what some are calling the “new Brooklyn”—with a lively bar scene, Casa Enrique is a definite reservation-required local hot spot. Service is great and the crowd is fun and chatty, maybe because they know they are about to experience some of the most satisfying Mexican in the NYC metro area. Expect solid standards like chunky hguacamole with house-made totopos and amazing seasonal cocktails like a watermelon mojito. Authenticity is a big deal here, with intense regional flavors like the incomparably earthy, rich, fragrant mole de piaxtla full of intense spice notes that will transport you directly to Chiapas (chef Cosme Aguilar’s hometown) but you’ll only have to go one subway stop from Grand Central Station to get this authentic taste of Mexico.

6: Taukeman New York 

This hip, tiny Long Island City spot just one subway stop on the 7 train from Manhattan is definitely worth the trip. The avocado and poke bowls are especially well-executed and craveable (you may feel compelled to stop by one more time on your way to LaGuardia). Taukeman's poke bowl features pickled vegetables, potato salad, fresh tuna and avocado and the ramen bowls are notable too, all served up in a compact but beautifully designed space. A small coffee bar featuring Parlor Coffee beans is ornamented with a wooden Japanese fishing boat. At the front of the restaurant is a mini-international grocery with items including artisanal, Brooklyn-made goods, matcha tea and Kewpie mayonnaise for sale. The spot gets bonus points for lo-fi style: water is served in enamel metal cups and the eclectic menu offers donuts, peanut butter cookies and other comfort food options for dessert or just a snack.  The space features rotating shows of local artists and a low-key cool vibe that makes it a favorite local hangout.  Founded by Japanese expat friends, this is one of those consummately NYC spots I know I will put on regular rotation.

7: Empire Diner

Empire Diner Exterior

Empire Diner Exterior

Chelsea's Empire Diner

Photo by: Quentin Bacon

Quentin Bacon

Chelsea's Empire Diner

This beautifully Art Moderne retro metal diner has stood on this spot in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan since 1946. The Empire Diner has weathered changes in food fashion, countless owners and chefs but finds itself in the solid hands of chef John Delucie who offers up a fitting menu of new classics (hello poke bowl) well-suited to this vintage gem.  Globe light fixtures, subway tile and a bright, hip ambiance make the space as much a pleasure as the food.

Burger at Empire Diner

Burger at Empire Diner

Don't miss the artisanal burger at Empire Diner.

Photo by: Quentin Bacon

Quentin Bacon

Don't miss the artisanal burger at Empire Diner.

You can’t go wrong with the basics here, which bring a foodie flourish to diner classics. The wedge salad loaded with tiny chopped-salad portions of avocado, lardons, slightly charred grape tomatoes and pickled onions crowning an enormous slice of iceberg sounds easy, but is a feat to pull off. The subtle blue cheese dressing never overwhelms this flavor medley and the enormous steak knife planted in its center is both witty and the perfect answer to this big mountain of green. And then there’s the burger: fans won’t be disappointed with this tower of two beef patties ably supported by aioli and house made pickles. Another clever take on one of the consummate American cakes, the coconut cake with caramelized pineapple is a fun, neat square (so coconut commands almost every forkful) of coconut cake like a snack cake packed by a dream mom in your lunch. And because hard-boiled New Yorkers of yore probably also needed a stiff drink now and again, this revamped cocktail bar has some big city power players like mezcal on the cocktail menu. The Bolt Bramble is the perfect blend of that smoky spirit, along with Ancho Reyes, cassis and fresh berry goodness to make you feel all is right with the world.

Blackberry Cocktail at Empire Diner

Blackberry Cocktail at Empire Diner

The Bolt Bramble at Empire Diner

Photo by: Empire Diner

Empire Diner

The Bolt Bramble at Empire Diner

8: Red Rooster

Chef Marcus Samuelsson at Red Rooster

Chef Marcus Samuelsson at Red Rooster

Marcus Samuelsson, the brains and talent behind Harlem's Red Rooster.

Photo by: Matt Dutile

Matt Dutile

Marcus Samuelsson, the brains and talent behind Harlem's Red Rooster.

A huge part of the Harlem foodie renaissance, Swedish chef Marcus Samuelsson’s sophisticated Southern spot on Lenox Avenue is a new classic serving up the kind of satisfying salt and butter and cracklings goodness that makes the impromptu dancing to the hopping live band all the more necessary. Southerners craving a homey fix won’t be disappointed by Red Rooster's cornbread so dense and rich, it rivals a pound cake and luscious mac and cheese better than your mother ever made (because she never enlivened it with brie or Gouda, for one). If you’re aiming for over-the-top fun, try the Fried Bird Royale for 2, a full-sized bird presented in its original glory before being whisked away for serving that comes with mac and cheese, biscuits and spicy honey. If it’s on the menu, don’t hesitate to order the jerk catfish with black beans, as satisfying a dish as they come. Street corn and Samuelsson’s mother’s meatball recipe define Red Rooster’s South-meets-global style where an equally diverse clientele makes everyone feel right at home.

Bedford and Company Interior

Bedford and Company Interior

The atmospheric, intimate NYC restaurant Bedford & Co.

Photo by: Bedford and Company

Bedford and Company

The atmospheric, intimate NYC restaurant Bedford & Co.

9: Bedford & Co

Cozy and unpretentious, Bedford & Co is that rare low-key restaurant where service is fine-dining top-notch. Tucked inside the Renwick Hotel. Bedford & Co has the vibe of a clubby, chummy British pub. The restaurant advertises its attention to detail right off the bat with its sommelier and manager cruising the dining room on a regular basis to ask about customers’ meals and a waitstaff that can tell you about the ingredients and preparation top to bottom. The cocktails are definitely worth a sip, especially the feminine but powerful Parasol, a perfumed blend of vodka, Lillet and St. Germain. The small plates are some of the stars of the show here, spotlighting the wood-fired oven. Don’t miss the smoky wood-grilled oysters and the fried artichoke appetizer with an aioli you won’t even need and a solid steak tartare. Desserts are also notable, ranging from a homespun raspberry cheesecake in a jar to a bracing, flavor-packed lemon basil sorbet.

Bedford and Company Fried Artichoke

Bedford and Company Fried Artichoke

Fried artichokes at Bedford & Co.

Photo by: Bedford and Company

Bedford and Company

Fried artichokes at Bedford & Co.

10: Sauvage

Part of Sauvage's charm is the shock of the unexpected. Perched on a fairly nondescript Greenpoint, Brooklyn intersection adjacent to McCarren Park, nothing prepares you for the gorgeous tiled floor, café curtains, craft cocktail vintage Paris bistro vibe (with a Brooklyn edge) inside.

Sauvage Restaurant

Sauvage Restaurant

Paris-meets-Brooklyn at Sauvage.

Photo by: Nicole Franzen/Sauvage

Nicole Franzen/Sauvage

Paris-meets-Brooklyn at Sauvage.

Aesthetics are an obsession at this visually precocious spot from the Eighties-meets-Constructivist graphics of the website to the Vienna-meets-Paris vibe of the restaurant itself boasting what, I have to add, may be the most gorgeous bathrooms in New York. The team of co-owner and proprietor Joshua Boissy and designer Michael Smart of Urban Aesthetics makes this spot a must-stop for lovers of understated but spot-on design.

Sauvage Bar

Sauvage Bar

The bar at Sauvage

Photo by: Nicole Franzen

Nicole Franzen

The bar at Sauvage

Every detail of Sauvage is exquisitely curated, from the caraway-flecked bread that comes with a delicate sliver of radish and whipped, salted house-made butter to the Art Nouveau teacups and artisanal sugar cubes that accompany your after-dinner tea and coffee. When a firefly made its way into the restaurant, adding its tiny flashing light to the magical glow of the hand blown glass chandeliers, for a moment I thought that had been orchestrated too. Some really unique cocktails served up at the French walnut bar play up the restaurant’s Europhile and cocktail pedigree (the Sauvage team is renowned for their destination-cocktail spot, Williamsburg’s Maison Premiere): try the refreshing Bitter Storm Over Ulm which sounds like Guy Maddin’s next film. It’s a surprisingly refreshing, subtle blend of piquant lemon and rich anise and the fruity punch of Macvin. A flavorful Amish chicken dish served up in a vintage enamel pot is comfort food at its finest. And don’t miss the local favorite, silky cavatelli with chunks of peekytoe crab to hunt out of the luscious sauce. Even those who usually skip dessert will want to save room for the complex chocolate tart whose sweetness is cut with smoked salt and a side of rosemary cream you’ll want to eat by the spoonful all by itself.

Keep Reading

Next Up

12 Family-Friendly NYC Restaurants

Hit up these fun, food-forward spots for good eats for the entire family.

The Ultimate Way to See All of NYC

Get a bird's eye view of the Big Apple with this thrilling helicopter ride.

Steak Paradise: 6 Best Beef-Centric Restaurants

With so many top-notch steakhouses across the United States, there is no wonder why Americans are hooked on red meat.

The Top 5 Places to Eat Poke in Hawaii

What better way to eat your favorite seafood than deliciously raw in a traditional poke bowl?

4 Must-Try Portland Brunch Spots

Dishing up a lot more than just bacon and eggs.

Pizza Paradise

We've zeroed in on some of the best pizza in the United States.

Kansas City BBQ: 6 Top Picks You Won’t Want to Miss

When in Kansas City, you’ll be surrounded by some of the best barbecue joints in the country. The only question is where to go first.

Steak Paradise: Part II

From Beverly Hills to Allegan, Michigan, we're serving up seconds of your favorite item on the menu.

Cheap Eats in NYC

Eat well and find cheap meals at these popular restaurants in New York City, including Gray's Papaya, Gotham Bar & Gril, Ippudo, and Prosperity Dumpling.