Street Eats: Latin America Pictures

Whether you're hungry for tacos in Mexico or ceviche in Peru, the street vendors of Latin America serve the tastiest local cuisine.

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Mrs. McMullen’s Appleberry Pie
Mrs. McMullen’s Appleberry Pie

Mrs. McMullen’s Appleberry Pie

Raise your spirits this Thanksgiving with Mrs. McMullen's Appleberry Pie. We’d happily trade canned cranberry sauce for this cocktail combination of raspberry, blueberry and blackberry. 960 1280

  

Frozen Mint Julep

Frozen Mint Julep

Start the summer off with a bang this Memorial Day by toasting with Frozen Mint Juleps. For non-southerners, this twist on the Kentucky Derby delight may make the bourbon more palatable -- and refreshing. 960 1280

  

Liam’s Midnight Toast

Liam’s Midnight Toast

Ring in the New Year (or Christmas -- it’s festive) with a classy, champagne cocktail like Liam's Midnight Toast. Garnish with an orange slice, and leave the speeches to your guests! 960 1280

  

Black Devil Martini

Black Devil Martini

For your adults-only Halloween party, serve this Black Devil Martini. This spooky spirit gets its color from dark rum, course orange sugar and a black olive garnish. 960 1280

  

Autumn Colors Cocktail

Autumn Colors Cocktail

The name says it all. This crisp, sweet-tea-vodka mixture is pretty enough for the Thanksgiving table thanks to pomegranate liqueur and orange zest. 960 1280

  

Hot Buttered Rum

Hot Buttered Rum

Warm your belly during the holidays with beloved Hot Buttered Rum. This classic mixed drink containing rum, caramelized brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg is perfect for enjoying fireside. 960 1280

  

Clarence’s Cranberry Toddy

Clarence’s Cranberry Toddy

It’s a wonderful life! We think right after Clarence, George Bailey’s guardian angel, finally got his wings he reached for this hot, cranberry concoction. 960 1280

  

Santa’s Pumpkin Pie Martini

Santa’s Pumpkin Pie Martini

One part Thanksgiving, 2 parts Christmas, we bet the big guy in red loves Santa's Pumpkin Pie Martini -- we do, too! 960 1280

  

Cocoa Raspberry Heaven

Cocoa Raspberry Heaven

Paradise is found with a sip of this raspberry-infused, hot-chocolate cocktail, some people might say. Top the whipped cream with a drizzle of Chambord and a fresh raspberry. 960 1280

  

Flavored with spices and warmed to perfection, a glass of mulled wine soothes the spirit. 960 1280

  

It's everyone's favorite spicy brunch cocktail, the Bloody Mary. 960 1280

  

Grab your beach blanket and bathing suit and hit the sand ' it's frozen daiquiri time. 960 1280

  

Not just for the Kentucky Derby, the Mint Julep is always a refreshing treat. 960 1280

  

Believed to have been invented in Puerto Rico, a Piña Colada hits the spot no matter where you drink it. 960 1280

  

Once considered an old-fashioned cocktail, the gimlet is gaining in popularity across America. 960 1280

  

Long a favorite in Spain, a fruity glass of sangria is the perfect summer cocktail. 960 1280

  

All you really need are tequila, triple sec and lime if you want to visit Margaritaville. 960 1280

  

Sweet cinnamon sticky buns are perfect with pecans on top. 960 1280

  

Cooked in a vat of bubbling oil, these french fries are a true indulgence. 960 1280

  

Fill up with a plate of tasty spaghetti served with tomato sauce and flecks of fresh basil. 960 1280

  

The only thing that can improve on a tasty slice of rich New York cheesecake is a gooey topping of sweet cherries. 960 1280

  

This burger is an all-American favorite, topped with cheese, lettuce, tomato, onions, special sauce and, of course, bacon. 960 1280

  

Don't just dismiss mac and cheese as kids' food; the luscious, creamy goodness tempts adult palates, too. 960 1280

  

The crisp green beans and burst cherry tomatoes look tasty, but the star on this plate is the mouthwatering steak. 960 1280

  

Who needs a plain doughnut when you can enjoy one topped with creamy icing and colorful sprinkles? 960 1280

  

Food Porn  8 Photos

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13 Photos
Mexican Chili Peppers

Mexican Chili Peppers

A feast of Hispanic cuisine gets its bite from a variety of Mexican chili peppers, including chipotle, ancho and guajillo. 960 1280

  

The Margarita

The Margarita

Whether it’s frozen or on the rocks, with salt or without, a margarita is the perfect way to quench your thirst during a Mexican feast. 960 1280

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Guacamole

Guacamole

Grab some chips and dig into a bowl of creamy guacamole made from fresh avocados. 960 1280

  

Tacos

Tacos

Dig into a plate of crunchy tacos filled with spicy meat, lettuce and fresh salsa. 960 1280

  

Pico de Gallo

Pico de Gallo

Perfect pico de gallo is a combination of tomatoes, onions, peppers and cilantro for a spicy kick. 960 1280

  

Sangria

Sangria

A Spanish import that’s served in Mexico, sangria is a sweet and delicious wine punch made with fresh fruit. Just be careful -- there’s more wine soaked into those apples than you think! 960 1280

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The Essentials

The Essentials

No Mexican meal is complete without the essential sides of chips, salsa, sour cream and guacamole. 960 1280

  

Tamales

Tamales

Tamales are a traditional Latin American favorite wrapped in corn husks. 960 1280

  

Tamale Ingredients

Tamale Ingredients

Dig into these tasty tamale packages packed with chicken, beans or peppers. 960 1280

  

Corona

Corona

Beer has a long history in Mexico and people all over the world recognize the blue and white label of a Corona. In fact, it’s one of the 5 most-consumed beers in the world. Try some of Mexico’s other popular beers: Tecate, Sol, Dos Equis, Modelo, Bohemia and Pacifico. 960 1280

arndw, flickr  

Tequila

Tequila

Tequila, made from blue agave plant, is another staple of Mexican drinks. Mix it with lime and Cointreau for a refreshing margarita, or take it as a shot with salt and a lime wedge. 960 1280

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Enchiladas

Enchiladas

A plate of steaming hot enchiladas is topped with spicy red sauce and served alongside rice and beans. 960 1280

  

Mexican Staples

Mexican Staples

Refried beans and yellow rice are menu staples at any authentic Mexican restaurant. 960 1280

  

Turkey: Raki

Turkey: Raki

Known as the national drink of Turkey, raki — pronounced “raka” — can be found at most large-scale liquor stores in the US. The trick to making the drink correctly? Use 1 part raki and 2 parts ice-cold water. Because the anise oils in the raki emulsify when mixed with water, the clear liquids combine to form a white beverage known as Lion’s Milk. It’s named that because Turks believe that raki gives you the strength of a lion. 960 1280

  

Russia: Vodka

Russia: Vodka

According to legend, a monk named Isidore -- from Chudov Monastery inside the Moscow Kremlin -- made the first Russian vodka. Since then, Russian vodka producers like Smirnoff, Stolichnaya and Russian Standard have become popular among vodka connoisseurs. This spirit is traditionally drunk neat, but it is also commonly used in cocktails like the vodka martini, Bloody Mary, Sex on the Beach, Screwdriver and White Russian. 960 1280

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Peru: Pisco Sour

Peru: Pisco Sour

Chile and Peru both claim the Pisco Sour as their national drink, but the cocktail originated in Lima, Peru. American bartender Victor Vaughn Morris invented and then served the first Pisco Sour at the counter of Morris’ Bar in the early 1920s. This concoction is usually made with bourbon or whiskey, lemon or lime juice, and a sweetener. 960 1280

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Japan: Sake

Japan: Sake

With its origin dating back to the 3rd century, sake is the beverage of choice in Japan. Sake is made from fermented rice. Undiluted, it contains 18 to 20% ABV (alcohol by volume). That’s double the amount of alcohol found in most beer. So sip slowly -- and savor its taste. 960 1280

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Mexico: Tequila

Mexico: Tequila

Tequila is made from the blue agave plant, located in the city of Tequila, in Jalisco, Mexico. And if you didn’t know already, Mexico has claimed the exclusive international right to the word “tequila,” which allows the country to take legal action against countries who manufacture the distilled blue agave spirits. Mexico’s national drink is the Paloma -- made by mixing tequila with a grapefruit-flavored soda, a lime wedge, and served in a glass rimmed with salt. Tequila is also mixed to make cocktails like the margarita, Tequila Sunrise, Matador and Tequila Slammer. 960 1280

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France: Champagne

France: Champagne

Wine and absinthe are popular spirits in France, but champagne is, too. The sparkling wine is produced from grapes grown in the country’s Champagne region, which includes Aube, Côte des Blancs, Côte de Sézanne, Montagne de Reims and Vallée de la Marne. Since the 17th century, champagne has been associated with luxury and power among royalty throughout Europe. Times have changed and now the tasty beverage is mixed with orange juice to create a mimosa, a tangy breakfast concoction. 960 1280

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New Orleans: Sazerac

New Orleans: Sazerac

In New Orleans, the Hurricane is a popular cocktail, but did you know about the Sazerac -- sometimes referred to as the oldest American cocktail? Mixologists believe this drink originated in the period before the American Civil War. This stiff drink is a mixture of cognac or rye whiskey, absinthe or Herbsaint, sugar and Peychaud’s Bitters. 960 1280

Patrick, Flickr  

Puerto Rico: Piña colada

Puerto Rico: Piña colada

Puerto Rican bartender Ramon Marrero created and sold the piña colada in 1954, while working at the Caribe Hilton International Hotel. He received numerous accolades, which included receiving an award from Coco Lopez -- the maker of the coconut cream used in the drink -- for selling his 3 millionth cocktail. In 1978, the government declared the piña colada the official drink of Puerto Rico. 960 1280

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Brazil: Caipirinha

Brazil: Caipirinha

Sit back and sip on Brazil’s national drink, the Caipirinha. The sweet, but refreshing cocktail is made with cachaça (sugarcane rum), sugar and lime. Looking for a more fruity taste? Try the caipifruta, made with cachaça, crushed ice and crushed fresh fruit or fruits, including tangerine, lime kiwifruit, passion fruit caju, mango, grapes, lemon, caja and/or pineapple. 960 1280

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NYC: Manhattan

NYC: Manhattan

Dr. Iain Marshall was the genius and creator behind the Manhattan cocktail first served at a banquet in honor of US presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden in 1870. Usually garnished with a maraschino cherry, the Manhattan is closely related to the Brooklyn cocktail, made using dry vermouth and Maraschino liqueur. A Manhattan is made with sweet vermouth, whiskey and bitters, an alcohol flavored with herbal essences. 960 1280

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Greece: Ouzo

Greece: Ouzo

A symbol of Greek culture, ouzo is an anise-flavored aperitif usually served with a small plate of appetizers that usually include small fresh fish, fries, olives and feta cheese. This drink is popular in Greece and Cyprus. It evolved from tsipouro, a beverage created by a group of 14th-century monks living in a monastery on Mount Athos. 960 1280

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Scotland: Scotch

Scotland: Scotch

After a long day at work, slowly sipping from a glass of Scotch whisky seems to make the worries of the world melt away. Scotch is a malt or grain whisky made in Scotland and aged in oak barrels for at least 3 years. Notable Scotch whisky brands include Bell’s, Dewar’s, Johnnie Walker, J&B, Chivas Regal and Cutty Sark. 960 1280

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UK: Pimm's Cup

UK: Pimm's Cup

James Kent was the first to serve Pimm’s Cup, in 1823 at a London oyster bar, making it a popular drink in England, particularly southern England. It is the one of 2 staple drinks at the Wimbledon tennis tournament, Henley Royal Regatta and the Glyndebourne Festival Opera. There are 7 Pimm’s products, but only Cup Nos. 1, 3 and 6 are still available. For a refreshing summer cocktail, we recommend the gin-based Pimm’s Cup No. 1 with chopped fruit and mixed with ginger ale or champagne. 960 1280

Whitney, Flickr  

Spain: Sangria

Spain: Sangria

Stop and share a pitcher of sangria with friends if you’re strolling through Barcelona’s Plaza Mayor. This tasty wine punch consists of wine (of course), chopped fruit, a splash of brandy and a sweetener, like honey, sugar, syrup or orange juice. Sangria is popular is Spain, Portugal, Mexico and Argentina. 960 1280

Kurmanstaff, Flickr  

Cuba: Mojito

Cuba: Mojito

Historians believe the African slaves who worked in Cuba’s sugarcane fields during the 19th century were instrumental in the mojito’s origin. The traditional Cuban cocktail consists of white rum, sugar, lime juice, sparkling water and mint. The mojito is not only popular in Cuba but was also author Ernest Hemingway’s favorite cocktail. 960 1280

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Singapore: Singapore Sling

Singapore: Singapore Sling

In Singapore, Ngiam Tong Boon, a bartender working at the Long Bar in Raffles Hotel Singapore, created the Singapore Sling sometime prior to 1915. The original recipe used gin, Cherry Heering, Benedictine and pineapple juice. Decades later, the hotel served the premixed drink from an automatic dispenser, but customers can request a shaken version from the bartender. 960 1280

Vasenka, Flickr  

Italy: Bellini

Italy: Bellini

Try this delicious cocktail if you’re visiting Italy. The Bellini is one of Italy’s most popular long drinks created by Giuseppe Cipriani, the founder of Harry’s Bar in Venice. The color of the drink reminded the mixologist of the color of a saint’s toga in a painting by the 15th-century artist Giovanni Bellini. So what’s in it? This mixed drink consists of Prosecco sparkling wine and peach puree. 960 1280

  

Belgium: Black Russian

Belgium: Black Russian

Belgian bartender Gustave Tops created the first Black Russian cocktail in 1949, at the Hotel Metropole in Brussels, in honor of Perle Mesta, who was (at that time) the US ambassador to Luxembourg. This cocktail contains 3 parts vodka and 2 parts coffee liqueur, owing its name to the use of vodka, a traditional Russian spirit. 960 1280

Todd Lappin, Flickr  

Sufganiyot (Israel)

Sufganiyot (Israel)

It’s not uncommon for Jewish people to eat fried food for Hanukkah to celebrate the miracle of oil, which refers to the oil in a lamp in an ancient temple lasting 8 days when there was only enough in the lamp for 1 day. Potato pancakes (latkes) are usually a common staple at the beginning of dinner, but sufganiyots (pictured) – jelly- or custard-filled doughnuts – are the most popular food eaten in Israel during this religious holiday. 960 1280

David Silverman / Getty Images  

Mince Pies (England)

Mince Pies (England)

Christmas dinner in the UK is similar to a typical Thanksgiving meal in US, which is usually comprised of roast turkey or duck with cranberry sauce, served with potatoes and vegetables. In addition to Christmas pudding, mince pie (pictured) is another popular food in the UK. This holiday treat is filled with minced meat, raw beef or mutton fat, fruits and spices. 960 1280

Donald Lain Smith/ Moment/ Getty Images  

Panettone (Italy)

Panettone (Italy)

In Southern Italians and Italian Americans celebrate the holidays by eating fish and other seafood for the Feast of the Seven Fishes. However, panettone, is a popular sweet bread loaf that contains raisins, citron, lemon peel shavings and candied orange. It is usually served with a hot drink, sweet wine or crema di mascarpone during Christmas and New Year’s Day. 960 1280

Vincenzo Lombardo / Getty Images  

Tamales (Mexico)

Tamales (Mexico)

With Aztec and Maya origins as early as 8000 to 5000 BC, tamales are a popular food eaten in Mexico during the holidays – sometimes replacing traditional turkey or bacalao. This delicious holiday treat – filled with meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables and chilies – is usually wrapped in corn husks or plantain leaves and steamed to perfection. 960 1280

Karin Dreyer/ Blend Images/ Getty Images  

Bûche de Noël (France)

Bûche de Noël (France)

Looking for something sweet in France? Don’t miss out on tasting the bûche de noël! This traditional dessert is a frosted sponge cake filled with chocolate buttercream or other flavored fillings. The cake resembles a yule log. In the medieval era, families would gather and throw a yule log on a fire at the end of December to welcome the Winter Solstice. The ashes were saved for good luck.  960 1280

Junghee Choi/ E+/ Getty Images  

Melomakarona (Greece)

Melomakarona (Greece)

Pork, egg-lemon chicken and rice soup, christopsomo, baklava and yaprakia are few traditional Greek food and dishes eaten during the holidays. Top it all off with melomakarona cookies made with cinnamon, cloves and orange. After they come out of the oven, the baked goods are dipped in spiced syrup and sprinkled with nuts. 960 1280

Steve Outram / Getty Images  

Babka (Poland)

Babka (Poland)

The first star seen starts the big Christmas Eve feast in Poland. Twelve dishes, usually a variety of fish and vegetables, are served as a reminder of the 12 Apostles. Beetroot soup, carp, pickled herring, potato dumplings and cabbage rolls are a few dishes served. Don’t eat too much and save space in your stomach for some delicious babka or cake. 960 1280

Boston Globe / Getty Images  

Kentucky Fried Chicken (Japan)

Kentucky Fried Chicken (Japan)

It’s not uncommon to see a crowd at the local KFC during the holidays in Japan. Why? Because it’s usually the popular food choice for Christmas dinner since turkey is nonexistent in the country. Japanese patrons have been known to place their KFC order 2 months in advance. So plan ahead and place your order early if plan on celebrating a Christmas like the locals. 960 1280

David Silverman/ Getty Images  

Saffron Buns (Sweden)

Saffron Buns (Sweden)

Swedish meatballs, Christmas ham, sweet and sour red cabbage, mulled wine, sliced beet root and an assortment of other goodies are traditional holiday food in Sweden. Don’t forget to add a basket of saffron buns – spiced sweet buns flavored with saffron, cinnamon or nutmeg. 960 1280

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Kutia (Ukraine)

Kutia (Ukraine)

Start your 12-dish meal on Christmas Eve in the Ukraine with kutia, a sweet grain pudding made with wheat berries, poppy seeds, raisins, honey or sugar and milk or cream. 960 1280

Izakorwel/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Christstollen (Germany)

Christstollen (Germany)

Taste christstollen, the German version of fruit cake eaten during the Christmas season. The traditional German cake is filled several ingredients such as almonds, cinnamon, dried fruit and marzipan. 960 1280

A.&F. Michler/ Photolibrary/ Getty Images  

Spiced Hot Chocolate (Peru)

Spiced Hot Chocolate (Peru)

Add chili to sweet hot chocolate and you’ve just made a traditional holiday drink in Peru. Spiced hot chocolate, served with panettone (traditional Italian bread), is usually given to the poor or less fortunate leading up to Christmas. Similar to Mexico, Peruvians holiday staples include tamales and roast turkey. 960 1280

Bhofack2/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Stroopwafels (Holland)

Stroopwafels (Holland)

These deliciously thin treats are a traditional dessert in Holland. Stroopwafels’ or syrup waffles’ main ingredients are butter, brown sugar, syrup and cinnamon. Try ginger nuts, Dutch Christmas bread and bishop’s wine if you’re looking for other traditional food and drink to sample in Holland or the Netherlands during the holidays. 960 1280

Dima P/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Kimchi (South Korea)

Kimchi (South Korea)

Don’t stay in … take your significant other out for a romantic dinner at a restaurant if you’re in South Korea. It’s normal for families to go out for Christmas dinner and attend holiday-themed events at local venues and theme parks. Kimchi is a year-round staple for families dining in for the holiday. After all, it is Korea’s national dish. 960 1280

Jukree/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Egg Nog (US)

Egg Nog (US)

Turkey, apple cider, candy canes, Christmas cookies, gingerbread, fruitcake are typical traditional foods served during the holidays in the US. But eggnog – made with milk, cream, sugar and whipped eggs – is a popular holiday treat, too. Add brandy, rum or bourbon to warm cold spirits and garnish with cinnamon or nutmeg for a decorative touch. 960 1280

Lauri Patterson/ E+/ Getty Images  

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