Video: History Lesson in Belfast

Michael and Mariana speak with Protestant loyalist about "the Troubles."
Bwzenith / iStock / Getty Images Plus

A Journey Through Time

Every city, state and country has historic sites that tell a story, whether it’s as significant as the signing of the Declaration of Independence or as simple as the childhood of a famous author. And when you connect with those stories, you can truly connect with your destination.

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On March 11 and 12, 1888, a devastating nor'easter dumped 40 to 50 inches of snow in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York. Huge snow drifts buried houses and trains, and the turbulent seas sank 200 ships with a loss of over 400 lives. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

The Great Blizzard of February 11-14, 1899, impacted a large area from Georgia to Maine, producing record low temperatures, some of which still stand today. Snowfall began in Florida and moved rapidly north. Washington, DC, recorded 20 inches in a single day; New Jersey, 34 inches -- still a record. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

The Great Lakes Storm (aka 'The White Hurricane') of 1913 was a blizzard with hurricane-force winds that devastated the region from November 7 to 10, 1913. It was the deadliest and most destructive natural disaster ever to hit the lakes, killing more than 250 people. In this photo, the people of Cleveland dig out of the mess. 960 1280

Wikimedia Commons  

The Knickerbocker Storm was a blizzard that occurred on January 27 and 28, 1922, in the upper South and Mid-Atlantic. The storm took its name from the resulting collapse of the Knickerbocker Theatre in Washington, DC, (pictured here), which killed 98 people and injured 133. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

The Armistice Day Blizzard pounded the Midwest on November 11, 1940. The raging storm produced snowfalls of up to 27 inches, winds of 50 to 80 mph, 20-foot snow drifts and 50-degree temperature drops over much of Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. A total of 145 deaths were blamed on the storm. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

The Blizzard of 1977 was a deadly blizzard that hit upstate New York and Southern Ontario from January 28 to February 1, 1977. The actual snowfall total was only 12 inches, but several days of sustained arctic gale-force winds kicked up huge snow drifts piled high on frozen Lake Erie and dumped them into the surrounding area. The blizzard was the first to be declared a Federal Emergency. 960 1280

Photo taken by Jeff Wurstner, Tonawanda, New York, Wikimedia Commons  

The Blizzard of 1978 was a catastrophic nor'easter that brought blizzard conditions to New England and the New York metropolitan area from February 5 to 7. Boston set a record with 27.1 inches of snow, as did Providence, RI, with 27.6 inches. The storm killed approximately 100 people and caused over $520 million in damage. 960 1280

By Dahoov2 (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons  

The Storm of the Century was a large cyclonic storm that occurred on March 12 and 13, 1993. It is unique for its hurricane-force winds and massive size -- stretching from Canada to Central America. Areas as far south as Alabama and Georgia received 8 to 16 inches of snow. The storm was responsible for 300 deaths and the loss of electric power to over 10 million customers. 960 1280

NOAA  

The Blizzard of 1999 slammed Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio on January 2-4, 1999. It dumped as much as 2 feet of snow in many areas. Travel was severely disrupted throughout the region and Chicago (pictured here) was paralyzed. Additionally, record low temperatures were measured in many towns in the days immediately after the storm. 960 1280

Reuters  

The February 2010 "Snowmageddon" blizzard buried the mid-Atlantic under 2 to 3 feet of snow. The storm set the all-time record for heaviest snowfall in Delaware history (26.5"), the second heaviest in Philadelphia (28.5"), second heaviest in Atlantic City (18.2"), third heaviest in Baltimore (24.8"), and the fourth heaviest in Washington, DC (17.8"). 960 1280

Getty Images  

An Art Car and Burning Man Statue
An Art Car and Burning Man Statue

An Art Car and Burning Man Statue

Held in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, Burning Man Festival is an “anything goes” event that’s been described as Mad Max meets Woodstock. The festival starts the last Monday in August and ends on the first Monday in September. 960 1280

Reuters  

Painted faces and peculiar, life-sized creatures of another dimension roam at the Roswell UFO Festival in New Mexico. 960 1280

Roswell UFO Festival  

For 4 days each summer, aliens are glorified in Roswell. 960 1280

Roswell UFO Festival  

Thousands of people make the trek to Roswell for haunted houses, parades and alien disc golf. 960 1280

Roswell UFO Festival  

You'll find the World's Largest Moon Pie at the RC and Moon Pie Festival in Bell Buckle, TN. 960 1280

TJ Hall  

Who cuts and serves the world's largest Moon Pie? The king, queen and knights of the Moon Pie Round. 960 1280

TJ Hall  

Each July, Gilroy, CA, celebrates its pride and joy at the Gilroy Garlic Festival. 960 1280

Bill Strange  

The epicenter of the garlic festival is Gourmet Alley, where pyro chefs entertain bystanders. 960 1280

Bill Strange  

Spamarama in Austin, TX, pays homage to everyone's favorite meat in a can. 960 1280

TheMuuj through Flickr Creative Commons  

Another name for Spamarama? The Pandemonious Potted Pork Festival. 960 1280

TheMuuj through Flickr Creative Commons  

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