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A Journey Through Time

Every city, state and country has historic sites that tell a story, whether it’s as significant as the signing of the Declaration of Independence or as simple as the childhood of a famous author. And when you connect with those stories, you can truly connect with your destination.

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Abraham Lincoln's Birthplace (Hodgenville, KY)
On February 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin on Sinking Farm. Today this site bears the address of 2995 Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgenville, KY. A cabin symbolic of the one Lincoln was born in, is preserved in a memorial building at the site.
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National Park Service  

Old State Capitol (Springfield, IL)
Abraham Lincoln announced his candidacy for the US President in 1858 at The Old State Capitol State Historic Site in Springfield, IL. President Obama also announced his presidential run at the same location in 2007.
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Getty Images  

Cooper Union Speech (New York, NY)
On February 27, 1860, Abraham Lincoln delivered The Cooper Union Speech in New York City. It is considered one of his most important speeches. Lincoln elaborated on his views about slavery, affirming that he did not want it to expand into the Western Territories, claiming that the Founding Fathers would agree with this position.
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DavidShankbone [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC-BY-SA-2.5-2.0-1.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons  

Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as President (Washington, DC)
Abraham Lincoln was sworn into office as the 16th US President at his inauguration on March 4, 1861, in Washington, DC.
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Library of Congress  

Fort Sumter Charleston, SC
On April 12, 1861, the first shots in the Civil War were fired here at Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, SC.
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Lincoln's Summer Home (Washington, DC)
Located on a picturesque hilltop in Washington, DC, President Lincoln's Cottage is the most significant historic site directly associated with Lincoln's presidency aside from the White House. During the Civil War, President Lincoln and his family resided here from June to November of 1862, 1863 and 1864.
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Library of Congress  

Antietam Battlefied (Antietam, MD)
Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation after claiming a Union victory at this bloody battle in Antietam, MD, in September 1862.
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Getty Images  

Gettysburg Address (Gettysburg, PA)
On November 19, 1863, President Lincoln (center without cap) delivered the Gettysburg Address during the American Civil War at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, PA. The speech is regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history.
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Library of Congress  

Ford's Theater (Washington, DC)
Ford's Theater, a historic theater in Washington, DC, was the site of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. John Wilkes Booth shot the president who was fatally wounded and carried across the street to the Petersen House. President Lincoln died the next morning.
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Library of Congress  

Peterson House (Washington, DC)
On April 15, 1865, Mary Todd Lincoln and her son waited in the front parlor of the Peterson Boarding House, as her husband lay wounded in the back bedroom. He later died in the house.
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Library of Congress  

Mount Rushmore (Keystone, SD)
Abraham Lincoln, along with Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Theodore Roosevelt, was memorialized in a 60-foot sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore, located near Keystone, SD. The carving started in 1927 and ended in 1941.
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Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum (Springfield, IL)
Figures representing the family of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln (far R) and Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth (L, background), are pictured in front of a small replica of the White House inside the new Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, IL. President George W. Bush took part in ceremonies dedicating the library to President Lincoln.
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REUTERS/Jason Reed JIR  

Lincoln Memorial (Washington, DC)
The Lincoln Memorial, located on Washington, DC's National Mall, was built to honor Abraham Lincoln. Henry Bacon was the architect, Daniel Chester French was the sculptor of the main statue and Jules Guerin was the painter of the memorial's interior. A dedication ceremony was held in May 1922.
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Reuters  

Blink and you may miss this desk-size memorial to America’s 32nd president. When asked how he’d like to be remembered, FDR said a simple stone in front of the National Archives would do. For 30 years, he got his wish -- until a 7.5-acre memorial was dedicated to him by the Tidal Basin.

Get more info about The Capital City. Check out our Travel Guide to Washington, DC.
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M.V. Jantzen, flickr  

Sure, they’re a traffic nuisance. But the circles that cut through DC’s avenues are also loaded with history. Many of the circles (34, in all) are named after American Civil War generals, like Thomas Circle. Here, a statue honors General George Henry Thomas, a Southerner who stayed loyal to the Union at great personal cost. 960 1280

Elvert Barnes, flickr  

When civil engineer Pierre Charles L’Enfant envisioned a future US capital, he thought it should include a memorial “to celebrate the first rise of the Navy and consecrate its progress and achievements.” But it wasn’t until 1987 that the US Navy Memorial was dedicated on Pennsylvania Avenue, America’s Main Street. 960 1280

Kate Mere and Sinha, flickr  

“What are those arches over there?” Anyone driving along 1-95 has had this thought when catching a glimpse of the US Air Force Memorial from afar. Dedicated in 2006, its 3 stainless steel spires evoke the image of Air Force Thunderbirds in a precision bomb-burst maneuver. 960 1280

Rob & Lisa Meehan, flickr   

Go ahead, sit on Uncle Albert’s lap. This personable memorial honors physics’ great genius. Tucked behind a grove of trees, beside the National Academy of Sciences, the memorial was dedicated in 1979 -- the centennial of Einstein’s birth. 960 1280

Zack Lee, flickr   

At DC’s Southwest Waterfront, you’ll find this haunting tribute to the Titanic’s men, who gave up their lives so that women and children could be saved. Erected by the “women of America” in 1931, the 13-foot granite figure was designed by American sculptor Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. 960 1280

Josh, flickr   

The Civil War saw African Americans granted the right to fight in defense of their country. The African American Civil War Memorial, at the corner of Vermont Avenue, honors the 209,145 such men who fought for the Union. 960 1280

  

“Here we admit a wrong.” With these words, the Memorial to Japanese-American Patriotism in World War II commemorates the 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent forcibly placed in internment camps. It also honors the 30,000 who volunteered for the US Armed Forces -- 800 of whom perished. 960 1280

M.V. Jantzen, flickr   

265,000 women served in the Vietnam War. All were volunteers. The Vietnam Women’s Memorial honors their role, often as nurses on the frontlines. 960 1280

Gorik Francois, flickr   

As in life, George Mason sits in the shadow of Thomas Jefferson, whose own memorial is a short walk away. Mason was the only Founding Father not to sign the US Constitution, fearing it did not go far enough in protecting individual rights. What followed was the Bill of Rights. 960 1280

Cliff, flickr   

In the 1880s, one man made it his personal mission to discourage people nationwide from drinking alcohol. So he funded “Temperance Fountains” across the US. Here’s one, on Pennsylvania Avenue. Pay your respects at this 4-columned sculpture, before grabbing a beer at the tavern across the street. 960 1280

Cliff, flickr   

DC is home to many war memorials, but none yet honor the 116,708 Americans killed in WWI. The closest that the nation’s capital comes is the District of Columbia War Memorial -- an understated marble structure that enshrines the names of nearly 500 Washingtonians killed in “the war to end all wars.” 960 1280

Cliff, flickr   

Born to former slaves in South Carolina, Mary McLeod Bethune rose to become an American education and civil rights leader. This statue of her in DC’s Lincoln Park is inscribed with her last will and testament: “I leave you love. I love you hope ...” 960 1280

Daniel Lobo, flickr  

Overlooking the city he helped lay out, the Benjamin Banneker Park and Memorial in southwest DC honors the self-taught African-American astronomer and surveyor who helped survey the future US capital in 1791. 960 1280

FinsUp0531, flickr   

The president who ensured that future generations would have national parks to enjoy is, fittingly, honored in a bucolic setting of his own: the Theodore Roosevelt Island National Memorial, on an 88.5-acre island beside the Potomac River. 960 1280

dctourism, flickr   

Every May, during National Police Week, thousands of officers and survivors visit the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial; it honors the 19,000 individuals who have died in the line of duty. 960 1280

Elvert Barnes, flickr   

The Victims of Communism Memorial honors its victims, both known and unknown. It was dedicated on June 12, 2007, the 20th anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s “tear down this wall” speech in front of the Berlin Wall. 960 1280

Prince Roy, flickr  

The Civil War was fought in DC, too. The Battle of Fort Stevens occurred in the district’s northwest quadrant on July 11-12, 1864. Years later, this memorial was dedicated to honor the men of the 25th NY Volunteer Cavalry, who died in battle.

Get more info about The Capital City. Check out our Travel Guide to Washington, DC.
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Joshua Kranzberg  


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