Remembering Sept. 11

Remember and reflect on the events of Sept. 11, 2001, at the NYC, Pentagon and Flight 93 national memorials.

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Dock Street Theatre
Dock Street Theatre

Dock Street Theatre

Opened in 1735, this working performance arts theatre has a long history of surviving fires, earthquakes, moves and renovations. Most recently remodeled in 2010, Dock Street Theatre remains the heart of Charleston’s arts scene with its performances by the Charleston Stage Company, concert series and Spoleto Arts festivals performances throughout the year. 960 1280

istock  

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

Visit the home of “the forgotten founder,” Charles Pinckney, an author and signer of the US Constitution. Take the half-mile tour of the Snee Farm just outside Charleston to learn about his life and the slaves that lived and worked on his lowcountry coastal plantation. 960 1280

Ken Lund, flickr  

Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter

While visiting Charleston, don’t miss seeing the location of the official start of the Civil War. Fort Sumter, built after the War of 1812, was the site of the opening Civil War battle on April 12, 1861. Located outside downtown Charleston on Sullivan’s Island, this national monument is run today by the National Park Service and open for visitors. 960 1280

istock  

Powder Magazine

Powder Magazine

South Carolina’s oldest public building, the Powder Magazine was built in 1713 and used as storage for gunpowder during the colonial days and the American Revolution. Today, the historic landmark is a museum showcasing Charleston’s combative history. 960 1280

Courtesy of The Post & Courier  

Aiken-Rhett House

Aiken-Rhett House

Located in downtown Charleston, Aiken-Rhett House and Museum was built in 1820 and remains the most well-preserved antebellum house in Charleston. Visitors can tour the grand house that William Aiken Jr., governor of South Carolina and one of its wealthiest citizens, lived in and then later left to his wife, daughter and son-in-law. 960 1280

David McSpadden, flickr  

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon

Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon

This historic treasure in Charleston played many roles in the city’s past -- it was the site of 18th-century assemblies, a prison during the American Revolution, a place where President George Washington greeted locals, and a spot where the Declaration of Independence was read. 960 1280

sfgamchick, flickr  

Magnolia Cemetery

Magnolia Cemetery

This historic cemetery is the oldest public cemetery in Charleston. Founded in 1849, Magnolia Cemetery is located on the banks of Cooper River and is the final resting place for famous Southerners, like politician William Aiken, Jr., author John Bennett and over 2,200 Civil War soldiers. 960 1280

Kristen Bobo, flickr  

Old Slave Mart Museum

Old Slave Mart Museum

Delve into Charleston’s historic role in the inter-state slave trade at the site where the slave auctions occurred. After the US Constitution was ratified in 1780 to include a ban on the importation of African slaves, the demand for domestic slaves increased. The museum not only tells the history of the city’s slave trade, but also the stories and the cultural legacies of the African-Americans who passed through Charleston. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Fort Moultrie

Fort Moultrie

Located on Sullivan’s Island, this series of citadels protected the city of Charleston during the Revolutionary War and almost a century later during the Civil War. The original fort, constructed of palmetto logs, inspired the South Carolina flag and state nickname, “The Palmetto State.” 960 1280

Getty Images  

City Market

City Market

Charleston's City Market has a long history dating back to the 1790s after Charles Picnkey donated a strip of his land for the establishment of a public market. Today it’s a popular destination for tourists and locals alike with 4 city blocks full of food, southern seafood specialties, clothing, artwork and the famous lowcountry sweetgrass baskets, perfect for souvenirs. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Old City Jail

Old City Jail

In the heart of the historic district lies the Old City Jail, a remembrance of Charleston’s tumultuous and dark past. The jail housed the city’s most notorious criminals, pirates and Civil War prisoners, and it was the site of the first US female serial killer’s public execution. Not surprisingly, there’s no shortage of ghost stories about this supposedly haunted historic landmark. 960 1280

  

H.L. Hunley Submarine

H.L. Hunley Submarine

H.L. Hunley earned its place in undersea warfare history as the first submarine to sink a warship. In 1864, the Confederate submarine torpedoed and sank the Union Navy’s largest warship, the Housatonic, and then sank to bottom of the ocean in the Charleston Harbor. Now you can tour the wreck, only recently discovered in the harbor in 1995. 960 1280

Friends of Hunley  

In 1963, nearly 300,000 protestors headed to the nation's capital for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which was a step in the right direction for passing the Civil Rights Act of1964. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his memorable 'I Have a Dream' speech at this spot on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington in 1963. 960 1280

Getty  

On March 30, 1965, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King led protestors in a march from Selma, AL, to the capitol in Montgomery to fight for black voting rights. 960 1280

Getty  

Martin Luther King Jr. slept in Room 306 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, TN, on the night before he was assassinated while standing on the hotel's balcony in 1968. 960 1280

Reuters  

The Lorraine Motel is now home to the National Civil Rights Museum, which chronicles the civil rights movement and provides opportunities to learn more about peace and justice in our world. 960 1280

Reuters  

Visitors pay their respects to Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King at the crypt at the King Center in Atlanta. 960 1280

Reuters  

Martin Luther King Jr. was the pastor at the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church & Parsonage in Montgomery, AL, between 1954 and 1960. Today, you can take a tour of the church and parsonage, both National Historic Landmarks. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Two great civil rights leaders are celebrated at the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Detroit. 960 1280

Reuters  

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati celebrates our country's civil rights heroes from the days of slavery and the Underground Railroad to modern times. 960 1280

Farshid Assassi/Assassi Productions  

In 1955, Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, refused to give up her seat on the bus for a white man. This action rocked the country and sparked another battle in the war for civil rights. Today, the public can step on the bus where it all began at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI. 960 1280

Getty  

The Rosa Parks Museum tells the tale of the 'victory ride' and the 381-day boycott of the Montgomery bus system that happened after Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on the bus. 960 1280

Getty  

Rosa Parks passed away in 2005 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Detroit. 960 1280

Getty  

Martin Luther King Jr. preached about nonviolence and peace from the pulpit of the original Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, which was across the street from the new sanctuary on the grounds of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site. 960 1280

  

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

In October 2011, after more than 2 decades of planning, the MLK Memorial opened in Washington, DC. Critics were unhappy with “drum major” quote abbreviation (pictured); the Department of Interior has since announced the quote will be removed. 960 1280

PBS NewsHour, flickr  

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