DC's Overlooked Memorials

You’ve heard of DC’s famous memorials around the National Mall. But the nation's capital has many others worth checking out, too. So ditch the guidebook and discover these overlooked DC memorials.

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Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II

London Celebrates the Queen
Queen Elizabeth II celebrates her Diamond Jubilee this year, marking her 60th year as monarch. A weekend of events in June is planned throughout the Commonwealth, culminating in a Royal Air Force flyover and a "Fire of Joy," a celebratory cascade of rifle fire given as a salute by the Queen's Guard.
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Getty Images  

Spider-Man turns 50

Spider-Man turns 50

Spider-Man Turns 50
Spider-Man made his first appearance in comics in 1962, making this his 50th anniversary. The newest Spiderman movie is also set for release this summer -- the perfect birthday gift for Spidey.
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Getty Images  

A War of 1812 reenactment

A War of 1812 reenactment

War of 1812 Bicentennial
The US declared war on Britain 200 years ago, setting off the War of 1812. This year bicentennial celebrations are being held by 10 states, as well as Washington, DC and Ontario.
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Titanic Exhibit in DC

Titanic Exhibit in DC

100 Years After the Titanic Tragedy
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Titanic's sinking, sparking renewed interest in the tragedy. James Cameron's Titanic movie has been rereleased in 3-D, and the National Geographic Museum in Washington, DC, has a new exhibit, "Titanic: 100 Year Obsession," which includes props from the 1997 movie.
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Arizona celebrates its centennial

Arizona celebrates its centennial

Arizona Celebrates Its Centennial
Arizona has taken on a series of statewide projects to commemorate its centennial. Projects include a documentary following 100 Arizona ranchers whose families have been ranching in the state since 1912 and a new museum that explores what it means to be an Arizonian.
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Thinkstock  

100 years of the Cherry Blossom Festival

100 years of the Cherry Blossom Festival

The National Cherry Blossom Festival
A century ago, Japan gave Washington, DC, a gift of 3,000 cherry blossom trees as a token of friendship. Each year, the US capital is painted pink with the blossoms, which lure visitors from all over the world.
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Thinkstock  

Louisiana's 200th year of statehood

Louisiana's 200th year of statehood

Louisiana's Bicentennial
To commemorate Louisiana's 200th anniversary, the Louisiana Bicentennial Commission has drawn up with a list of 200 free things that visitors can do in the state. These include visiting the state's 180-mile long Creole Nature Trail, which is home to 400 bird species.
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Thinkstock  

Charles Dickens turns 200

Charles Dickens turns 200

Charles Dickens' Birthday
Even though Charles Dickens turned 200 back in February, the party is continuing all year long with a Dickensian exhibit at the Museum of London and a guided tour through Chalk Church, which was featured in Great Expectations.
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Getty Images  

New Mexico's 100th year as a state

New Mexico's 100th year as a state

New Mexico's 100th Year
New Mexico celebrates 100 years of statehood this year. As part of the celebration, the state's governor created the Centennial Children's Legacy Fund, which hopes to improve the education and welfare of New Mexico's children.
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Nicholas_T, flickr  

Golden Gate Bridge celebrates 75 years

Golden Gate Bridge celebrates 75 years

The Golden Gate Bridge Turns 75
For the Golden Gate Bridge's 75th anniversary in May, San Francisco is going all out with a day-long festival that will celebrate the history of the bridge and the culture of the city -- all culminating in a fireworks grand finale.
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Geoff Stearns, flickr  

The Space Needle opened 50 years ago

The Space Needle opened 50 years ago

The Space Needle's 50th Anniversary
Fifty years ago, when the Space Needle opened at the Seattle World's Fair, it was called "The Space Cage." It was built in just 1 year and 4 days.
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Thinkstock  

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center

Amid cheers and whistles from workers, the final piece of the spire of One World Trade Center is hoisted into place in May 2013. More than 10 years after NYC’s skyline was changed forever, the new building -- now the tallest in the United States -- rises 1,776 feet into the air, a testament to the Big Apple’s resilience in the years following the day that would come to mark the single-largest loss of civilian life on US soil. 960 1280

REUTERS/Gary He  

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center

In years past, visitors from around the world came to pay their respects and see the progress being made on 1 World Trade Center. 960 1280

Travel Channel  

9/11 Memorial Plaza

9/11 Memorial Plaza

People walk through the 9/11 Memorial Plaza at One World Trade Center, site of the original World Trade Center Towers. Nearly 400 trees fill the plaza, inviting visitors to reflect on the events that occurred here. Meanwhile, One World Trade Center is set to open for business in 2014, with companies including Conde Nast and Vantone Holdings soon to have offices here. 960 1280

Mario Tama/Getty Images  

9/11 Memorial Plaza

9/11 Memorial Plaza

New York police, firefighters and Port Authority officers at one of the entrances of the 9/11 Memorial Plaza during the 10th anniversary ceremony. In all, 343 firefighters (including FDNY fire chaplain Mychal Judge), 23 NYPD officers and 37 Port Authority police officers lost their lives in the Sept. 11 attacks. Roughly 2,000 first responders were also injured that day. 960 1280

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images   

9/11 Memorial Museum

9/11 Memorial Museum

Two steel "tridents," which once held up the Twin Towers’ walls, stand in the entry of the pavilion area of the future 9/11 Memorial Museum. The museum, located 7 stories below the Memorial Plaza, is set to open in spring 2014, with 110,000 square feet of exhibition space dedicated to recounting the events of 9/11 through multimedia displays and voice recordings, like that of flight attendant CeeCee Lyles. 960 1280

REUTERS/Mike Segar  

WTC Site, Lower Manhattan

WTC Site, Lower Manhattan

In past years on Sept. 11, 2 columns of lights marked the place where NYC's Twin Towers once stood. 960 1280

Reuters  

9/11 Memorial

9/11 Memorial

The 9/11 Memorial in NYC honors the nearly 3,000 people who died in the Twin Towers and on the ground, near Shanksville, PA, and at the Pentagon, along with those who died in the World Trade Center bombing in 1993. 960 1280

Joe Woolhead  

North Memorial Pool

North Memorial Pool

US flags honor the memory of 25-year-old Bryan Bennett, whose name is etched into the rim of the north pool of the 9/11 Memorial. Bennett was one of the 2,606 who died in the World Trade Center attacks; he worked for eSpeed, a company that occupied the North Tower (1 World Trade Center). 960 1280

Jefferson Siegel-Pool/Getty Images  

Flight 93 Memorial

Flight 93 Memorial

After nearly 10 years of planning and fundraising, the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, PA, was officially dedicated on Sept. 10, 2011. The first phase of the memorial saw completion with the Wall of Names. The names of all 40 passengers and crew who perished on the flight are etched into the white marble. 960 1280

Jeff Swensen/Getty Images  

Flight 93 Memorial

Flight 93 Memorial

The Flight 93 memorial near Shanksville, PA, honors the 40 people who died on the hijacked flight trying to save others. The memorial was dedicated on the 10th anniversary of the attacks, with fundraising efforts led in large part by Flight 93 families. 960 1280

Paul Murdoch  

Pentagon at Night

Pentagon at Night

Dedicated in 2008, the Pentagon Memorial honors those 184 men and women who died on American Airlines Flight 77 and in the Pentagon itself. Each of the benches displays the name of a victim. They are organized from youngest to oldest, from 3-year-old Dana Falkenberg to 71-year-old John Yamnicky Sr. 960 1280

Michael Myers, flickr  

Pentagon Memorial

Pentagon Memorial

Young visitors pay their respects at the 9/11 memorial outside the Pentagon in Washington, DC. Maple trees are planted on the grounds of the memorial, which is open 7 days a week, year-round. 960 1280

Reuters  

Pentagon Memorial

Pentagon Memorial

Each year DC-area residents pay tribute to the victims of the attack on the Pentagon. Here, members of the military stand in unison, holding state flags. In 2013, President Obama will travel to the Pentagon Memorial to attend the Sept. 11th Observance Ceremony. 960 1280

Reuters  

Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970) was a guitarist and singer-songwriter. He has been called the greatest electric guitar player of all time. Learn more about him at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. 960 1280

Evening Standard/Getty Images  

Maya Angelou (born 1928) is a civil-rights activist, poet and autobiographer. Author of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Angelou was recently awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom. In October, 2010, 343 boxes of Angelou's correspondence, notes and personal papers were donated to the Schromberg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City, and will be available to the public some time in 2012. 960 1280

Kris Connor/Getty Images  

Louis Armstrong (1901-1971) was an American trumpet player and singer. He played a pivotal role in the development of jazz. Visit the Louis Armstrong House Museum in Queens, NY, to learn more. 960 1280

Central Press/Getty Images  

Civil-rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) remains the most iconic figure of the American civil-rights movement. He is known for his teachings of nonviolence, and a memorial to honor his life is currently under construction in Washington, DC. To learn more about Dr. King, visit the King Center in Atlanta, GA. 960 1280

William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images  

American boxer Muhammad Ali (born 1942) is considered one of the greatest heavyweight championship boxers of all time. Visit the Ali Center in Louisville, KY, to learn more about his remarkable life. 960 1280

R. McPhedran/Express/Getty Images  

A television personality and philanthropist, Oprah Winfrey (born 1954) has been called one of the most influential women in the world. On an episode of her show, she mentioned that she loved angel statuettes but couldn't find any black ones. Her viewers responded and mailed her so many, that she recently donated her collection to the Angel Museum in Beloit, WI. 960 1280

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images  

Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993), shown here with former President Lyndon Johnson, was the first African-American member of the Supreme Court. Visit the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, for a look at his personal notes and papers. 960 1280

Keystone/Getty Images  

Michael Jordan (born 1963) is considered one of the best basketball players of all time, and is credited with helping popularize the NBA around the world. Visit the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, MA, to learn more. 960 1280

Doug Pensinger/Allsports/Getty Images   

Rosa Parks (1913-2005) was an American civil-rights activist, famous for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, an important turning point in the civil-rights movement. Visit the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI, to get a look at the bus Parks rode. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Malcolm X (1925-1965) was an influential Muslim minister, autobiographer, and human-rights activist. Learn more about Malcolm X by visiting New York City's Memorial/Education Center at the Shabazz Center, the site of his assassination in 1965. 960 1280

Library of Congress  

Aretha Franklin (born 1942) is a singer, songwriter and pianist who has been called one of the greatest singers of all time and is widely regarded as the Queen of Soul. Learn more at the new exhibit, Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power, opening in May at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. 960 1280

Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images  

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was a former slave who taught himself to read and write and became an author, orator and abolitionist. To learn more, take a tour of Cedar Hill, Douglass' home in Washington, DC. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images. Engraving by A.H. Ritchie  

Hank Aaron (born 1934) is considered one of the best baseball players of all time. In 1973 he broke Babe Ruth's home-run record. Visit Turner Field in Atlanta, GA, to see the fence that Aaron hit his 715th home run over. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Harriet Tubman (1822-1913) was an abolitionist famous for her many trips along the Underground Railroad. After escaping from slavery herself, she helped more than 70 others escape to freedom. Learn more about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, OH. 960 1280

National Portrait Gallery  

James Brown (1933-2005) was a singer and has been referred to as the Godfather of Soul. Visit the Augusta Museum of History in Augusta, GA, to learn more. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Miles Davis (1926-1991) was a composer, trumpeter and key figure in the history of jazz. You can pay your respects at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York City. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Ray Charles (1930-2004) has been called one of the greatest artists of all time. He was one of the first African-American musicians to be given artistic control by a mainstream record company and is often called the pioneer of soul music. To learn more, visit the Ray Charles Memorial Library in Los Angeles, CA, when it opens to the public in 2011. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Jackie Robinson (1919-1972) was the American baseball player who broke the 'color line' in baseball when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Learn more about Jackie Robinson at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, located in Cooperstown, NY. 960 1280

Curt Gunther/Keystone/Getty Images  

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was born into slavery but escaped to become an abolitionist, women's-rights activist and orator. Visit Florence, MA, to see her memorial. 960 1280

Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

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