Christmas Crazy

Go "Christmas Crazy" with a German-style market, a gingerbread house competition and the brightest light displays, plus the coolest ice sculptures and the most extreme Santas on Earth.

You Might Also Like

november, things to do, arts and culture, sports, activities, macy's thanksgiving day parade
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Head to the Big Apple for Macy’s annual Thanksgiving Day Parade. The three-hour event starts at 9 a.m. Thanksgiving Day, but better come early (and wear warm clothes); crowds start arriving hours earlier to stake out a spot. If a 5 a.m. wakeup call’s not your thing, these NYC Hotels offer great views of the parade’s lineup of floats, clowns and more. 960 1280

TIMOTHY A. CLARY / Getty Images  

Breeders' Cup

Breeders' Cup

Wondering where to travel in November? Start by taking in two days of action-packed thoroughbred horse races. The annual Breeders’ Cup World Championship kicks off this month at California’s oldest racetrack, Santa Anita Park. Better grab your tickets fast, though; attendance is usually much higher than other stake races in North America.
 960 1280

Rob Carr / Getty Images  

Movember

Movember


Bros! Ditch the razor for a month-long celebration of some fierce facial hair. Movember (the month formerly known as November) unfolds with dozens of runs and gala parties nationwide to raise awareness of men’s health issues. That spells one perfect excuse to finally try out that wicked handlebar ’stache.
960 1280

Sasha Haagensen / Getty Images  

The Day of the Dead

The Day of the Dead

Families decorate the graves of loved ones  throughout Mexico as part of this annual national holiday. A blend of pre-Columbian and Catholic traditions, Day of the Dead may sound notoriously spooky to outsiders. But to those who celebrate it, the day offers a way to reflect and share in treasured memories of loved ones through acts of commemoration, including making altars like this.
960 1280

steve bridger, flickr  

Black Friday

Black Friday

America at its finest, folks. Yes, you too can trample over terrified cashiers in pursuit of a bargain HD TV. If you prefer something a little more orderly this Black Friday, head to some of America’s best shopping malls. Our top pick: Mall of America, home to more than 180 retailers. Bring your ID and some good walking shoes. Plus better remember where you parked! 960 1280

Sandy Huffaker / Getty Images  

Busiest Travel Days, Start Planning!

Busiest Travel Days, Start Planning!

Notoriously long lines and long waits: The day before Thanksgiving ranks as the busiest travel day of the year. Drive, fly or take the train -- we don’t care how you get here, just as long as you arrive in notorious aplomb and style (no fugly Thanksgiving sweaters, please). 960 1280

John Moore/Getty Images  

NYC Marathon

NYC Marathon

Lace up your sneakers for the New York City Marathon. More than 50,000 people compete in the world’s largest marathon. Cheer on the participants as they race through the city’s five boroughs and head to the finish line if you’re not competing in the 26-mile run. 960 1280

JEWEL SAMAD / Getty Images  

NASCAR Sprint for the Cup

NASCAR Sprint for the Cup

Feeling the need for speed? NASCAR enthusiasts will feel it in droves at one of the country's best NASCAR racetracks, the Homestead-Miami Speedway. This month, the motor racing track hosts the annual NASCAR Sprint for the Cup, in which racing’s top drivers will compete for the championship trophy – it all unfolds in the Ford EcoBoost 400 season finale. 960 1280

Orlando Sentinel / Getty Images  

Native American Heritage Month

Native American Heritage Month

Heroic resolve in the midst of often notorious treatment defines Native American Heritage Month. Kick off this special month of commemoration -- and appreciation -- with a visit to this dazzling waterfall, tucked in a land in the heart of the Grand Canyon that’s been home to the Havasupai American Indian tribe for nearly 1,000 years.
960 1280

Thinkstock  

San Diego Bay Wine + Food Festival

San Diego Bay Wine + Food Festival

Notoriously passionate wine and food lovers descend on Southern California each November for the region’s largest festival of its kind. How notorious are we talking? Well, let’s just say any festival that lures some of the best national chefs, local culinary stars, and celebrated winemakers and brewmasters means serious gastronomic pleasure is in order. 960 1280

Ken Loyst  

Fun Fun Fun Fest

Fun Fun Fun Fest

The darling of independent festivals for music lovers and music-makers alike, Fun Fun Fun Fest has some notoriously serious creds. Ever since its launch in 2006, this annual festival has skyrocketed beyond its downtown Austin roots to world-renowned status, attracting artists and their fans from around the globe.
960 1280

incase, flickr  

Deer Hunting Season

Deer Hunting Season

Notorious to some, delectably yummy to others, deer-hunting season begins with a bang -- sorry, Bambi -- come November. That’s because the month is prime deer-mating season: Male bucks are often so distracted by the urge to mate they may not detect the sound of Grandpa Earl’s carbine locking and loading off in the distance. Head to states like Kentucky, New Hampshire and Minnesota for the hunt.
960 1280

Thinkstock  

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery

On a sunny autumn day in November 1963, America’s love affair with Camelot came to a shattering end. Just weeks before his assassination, JFK visited Arlington National Cemetery and, standing atop a hill, said he could spend eternity there. Today, he is one of two presidents buried on the 600-acre grounds, an eternal flame placed by his widow Jackie to outshine one of the most notorious moments in U.S. history. 960 1280

Anna Fox, flickr  

Chicago’s The Food Film Festival

Chicago’s The Food Film Festival

Food in the theater?! The sight may be a notorious no-no to crabby old docents, but at this annual festival, the paired enjoyment of food and film -- from the comfort of a theater seat -- is a must. The annual event, now in its third year, invites audience members to actually taste some of the dishes they see before them on the big screen.
960 1280

Food Film Festival  

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

Mmm, mmm, good! Perfectly succulent (when baked right), the turkey takes center stage at many holiday tables. America cooks up more than 45 million turkeys for Thanksgiving, plus another 22 million come Christmastime, which adds up to a whole lotta post-meal sleepiness.
960 1280

Thinkstock  

The Rockettes

The Rockettes

Let’s go girls! Those sky-high kicks, those naughty smiles -- oh, it certainly wouldn’t be a notoriously fun November without the Rockettes. During the holiday season, the legendary dance company kicks it into high gear with five shows a day, seven days a week. See the grand show unfold in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular, presented at Radio City Music Hall. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Photos

Jamaica: Sorrel Punch

Jamaica: Sorrel Punch

Sorrel, similar to hibiscus, gives this cocktail a beautiful, festive red color. For extra wow, bartender Kat Hawkins of Wright and Co. garnishes with sorrel flowers. 960 1280

  

Bolivia: Biblia Con Pisco

Bolivia: Biblia Con Pisco

Biblia Con Pisco is very similar to the Peruvian Algarrobina but without the namesake syrup and a few other ingredients. Bartender Michael Finsilver of Mudgie's uses pisco, eggs, sugar and a spice blend for a simple, but decedent drink.

 

960 1280

  

Germany: Gluhwein

Germany: Gluhwein

Gluhwein is enjoyed around Europe but especially in Germany and Austria. The cocktail is a sweetened mulled wine variation. Bartender Daniel McCarthy of La Dulce shares an example of serving this for a party. 960 1280

  

Scotland: Hot Toddy

Scotland: Hot Toddy

Hot Toddys are incredibly popular but did you know in Scotland they are traditionally made with Scotch? Bartender David Miles-Cole Martinez of The Last Word garnishes this classic with cinnamon sticks and lemon twists. 960 1280

  

Peru: Algarrobina

Peru: Algarrobina

This Peruvian cocktail revolves around the syrup by the same name. It resembles molasses but is something unique to the country. The drink is similar to egg nog since it includes eggs and evaporated milk but the syrup gives it a definitive South American flair. Bartender Scott Poole, of Sugar House Detroit, created this example with an elegant star anise garnish. 960 1280

  

Kenya: Dawa

Kenya: Dawa

The Kenyan Dawa, a vodka drink with honey and lime, is delicious any time of year but can be made more festive by adding cranberries or flavored vodka. Bartender Liz Cosby, of Sugar House Detroit, gives it another holiday twist by adding orange zest.  960 1280

  

Chile: Cola de Mono

Chile: Cola de Mono

Chile's Cola De Mono could be described as something between egg nog and a White Russian. Bartender Joe M. Schubert, of The Whisky Parlor, points out that both dairy and non-dairy versions can be made for parties. And whether it's made with almond or whole milk, all versions are delicious.

 

960 1280

  

Poland: Grzane Piwo

Poland: Grzane Piwo

The Grzane Piwo, a mulled beer, is a classic beverage enjoyed in Poland through the holiday season. Bartender Amas Muhammad, of The Peterboro, adds orange slices for extra holiday cheer. 960 1280

  

USA: Tom and Jerry

USA: Tom and Jerry

The Tom and Jerry, served hot, is an amped up egg nog that is extra creamy and delicious. In the 1950s you could buy a powdered mix but here bartender Jon Foley, of The Laundry, made his restaurant's homemade recipe. 960 1280

  

Sweden: Glogg

Sweden: Glogg

Similar to German Gluhwein, this drink is fortified with Cognac for added holiday cheer. Bartender Beaux Coup Kerin, of Detroit's Sugar House, tops each glass with rosemary.  960 1280

  

Cuba: Crema de Vie

Cuba: Crema de Vie

Many holiday cocktails are variations on egg nog but when you go to Cuba you have to use rum. The Crema de Vie, or "cream of life," is presented above by bartender Majid Abdelnour of Bigalora. 960 1280

  

Mexico: Ponche de Frutas

Mexico: Ponche de Frutas

Cool weather means hot cocktails and if you are in Mexico consider ordering a traditional Ponche de Frutas. Bartender Jon Foley, of Relief and Resource, makes his with stone fruits, spices, rum and the all-important Piloncillo (a Mexican brown sugar).

 

960 1280

  

England: Wassail

England: Wassail

Wassail is a traditional holiday punch for England and the UK. Famed bartender Marlowe Johnson, of Standby Detroit, shared his family favorite in this shot. Bourbon, cider, cranberry and lots of spices warm the soul on any wintery night. 960 1280

  

Sufganiyot (Israel)

Sufganiyot (Israel)

It’s not uncommon for Jewish people to eat fried food for Hanukkah to celebrate the miracle of oil, which refers to the oil in a lamp in an ancient temple lasting 8 days when there was only enough in the lamp for 1 day. Potato pancakes (latkes) are usually a common staple at the beginning of dinner, but sufganiyots (pictured) – jelly- or custard-filled doughnuts – are the most popular food eaten in Israel during this religious holiday. 960 1280

David Silverman / Getty Images  

Mince Pies (England)

Mince Pies (England)

Christmas dinner in the UK is similar to a typical Thanksgiving meal in US, which is usually comprised of roast turkey or duck with cranberry sauce, served with potatoes and vegetables. In addition to Christmas pudding, mince pie (pictured) is another popular food in the UK. This holiday treat is filled with minced meat, raw beef or mutton fat, fruits and spices. 960 1280

Donald Lain Smith/ Moment/ Getty Images  

Panettone (Italy)

Panettone (Italy)

In Southern Italians and Italian Americans celebrate the holidays by eating fish and other seafood for the Feast of the Seven Fishes. However, panettone, is a popular sweet bread loaf that contains raisins, citron, lemon peel shavings and candied orange. It is usually served with a hot drink, sweet wine or crema di mascarpone during Christmas and New Year’s Day. 960 1280

Vincenzo Lombardo / Getty Images  

Tamales (Mexico)

Tamales (Mexico)

With Aztec and Maya origins as early as 8000 to 5000 BC, tamales are a popular food eaten in Mexico during the holidays – sometimes replacing traditional turkey or bacalao. This delicious holiday treat – filled with meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables and chilies – is usually wrapped in corn husks or plantain leaves and steamed to perfection. 960 1280

Karin Dreyer/ Blend Images/ Getty Images  

Bûche de Noël (France)

Bûche de Noël (France)

Looking for something sweet in France? Don’t miss out on tasting the bûche de noël! This traditional dessert is a frosted sponge cake filled with chocolate buttercream or other flavored fillings. The cake resembles a yule log. In the medieval era, families would gather and throw a yule log on a fire at the end of December to welcome the Winter Solstice. The ashes were saved for good luck.  960 1280

Junghee Choi/ E+/ Getty Images  

Melomakarona (Greece)

Melomakarona (Greece)

Pork, egg-lemon chicken and rice soup, christopsomo, baklava and yaprakia are few traditional Greek food and dishes eaten during the holidays. Top it all off with melomakarona cookies made with cinnamon, cloves and orange. After they come out of the oven, the baked goods are dipped in spiced syrup and sprinkled with nuts. 960 1280

Steve Outram / Getty Images  

Babka (Poland)

Babka (Poland)

The first star seen starts the big Christmas Eve feast in Poland. Twelve dishes, usually a variety of fish and vegetables, are served as a reminder of the 12 Apostles. Beetroot soup, carp, pickled herring, potato dumplings and cabbage rolls are a few dishes served. Don’t eat too much and save space in your stomach for some delicious babka or cake. 960 1280

Boston Globe / Getty Images  

Kentucky Fried Chicken (Japan)

Kentucky Fried Chicken (Japan)

It’s not uncommon to see a crowd at the local KFC during the holidays in Japan. Why? Because it’s usually the popular food choice for Christmas dinner since turkey is nonexistent in the country. Japanese patrons have been known to place their KFC order 2 months in advance. So plan ahead and place your order early if plan on celebrating a Christmas like the locals. 960 1280

David Silverman/ Getty Images  

Saffron Buns (Sweden)

Saffron Buns (Sweden)

Swedish meatballs, Christmas ham, sweet and sour red cabbage, mulled wine, sliced beet root and an assortment of other goodies are traditional holiday food in Sweden. Don’t forget to add a basket of saffron buns – spiced sweet buns flavored with saffron, cinnamon or nutmeg. 960 1280

Rhoberazzi/ E+/ Getty Images  

Kutia (Ukraine)

Kutia (Ukraine)

Start your 12-dish meal on Christmas Eve in the Ukraine with kutia, a sweet grain pudding made with wheat berries, poppy seeds, raisins, honey or sugar and milk or cream. 960 1280

Izakorwel/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Christstollen (Germany)

Christstollen (Germany)

Taste christstollen, the German version of fruit cake eaten during the Christmas season. The traditional German cake is filled several ingredients such as almonds, cinnamon, dried fruit and marzipan. 960 1280

A.&F. Michler/ Photolibrary/ Getty Images  

Spiced Hot Chocolate (Peru)

Spiced Hot Chocolate (Peru)

Add chili to sweet hot chocolate and you’ve just made a traditional holiday drink in Peru. Spiced hot chocolate, served with panettone (traditional Italian bread), is usually given to the poor or less fortunate leading up to Christmas. Similar to Mexico, Peruvians holiday staples include tamales and roast turkey. 960 1280

Bhofack2/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Stroopwafels (Holland)

Stroopwafels (Holland)

These deliciously thin treats are a traditional dessert in Holland. Stroopwafels’ or syrup waffles’ main ingredients are butter, brown sugar, syrup and cinnamon. Try ginger nuts, Dutch Christmas bread and bishop’s wine if you’re looking for other traditional food and drink to sample in Holland or the Netherlands during the holidays. 960 1280

Dima P/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Kimchi (South Korea)

Kimchi (South Korea)

Don’t stay in … take your significant other out for a romantic dinner at a restaurant if you’re in South Korea. It’s normal for families to go out for Christmas dinner and attend holiday-themed events at local venues and theme parks. Kimchi is a year-round staple for families dining in for the holiday. After all, it is Korea’s national dish. 960 1280

Jukree/ iStock/ Getty Images  

Egg Nog (US)

Egg Nog (US)

Turkey, apple cider, candy canes, Christmas cookies, gingerbread, fruitcake are typical traditional foods served during the holidays in the US. But eggnog – made with milk, cream, sugar and whipped eggs – is a popular holiday treat, too. Add brandy, rum or bourbon to warm cold spirits and garnish with cinnamon or nutmeg for a decorative touch. 960 1280

Lauri Patterson/ E+/ Getty Images  

Hawaii

Hawaii

Christmas Day in Hawaii usually means a large meal and a trip to the beach, where entertainers including ukulele players and hula dancers perform for holiday crowds. Of course, Santa himself, prefers Hawaiian garb, as well. 960 1280

JEWEL SAMAD  

Australia

Australia

Forget mittens and sleds. Australia’s Father Christmas is most likely to bring towels, boogie boards and flipflops. After the traditional Christmas lunch, Aussies head to the beach, like Sydney’s Bondi Beach shown here, to kick off summer holidays. 960 1280

PETER PARKS  

The Bahamas

The Bahamas

Between December 25 and January 1, Bahamians celebrate Junkanoo, a carnival-like festival in which masked and costumed dancers parade through the streets. 960 1280

Richard Ellis  

Brazil

Brazil

Brazil’s warm weather may seem at odds with the traditional snowflake and Christmas tree decor that’s popular in the area. Here a reveler paddle boards past the world’s largest floating Christmas tree in Rio de Janeiro’s Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon.  960 1280

YASUYOSHI CHIBA  

Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Christmas morning in Ethiopia begins with celebrants attending church dressed in white. There, priests perform Christmas rituals that include playing drums. 960 1280

Anadolu Agency  

Colombia

Colombia

The Day of the Candles, celebrated on the night of December 7, marks the evening of the Feast of the Immaculate Conception in Colombia, as well as the beginning of the country’s Christmas holidays.  960 1280

AFP  

New Zealand

New Zealand

In New Zealand, the Pohutukawa stands in for the Christmas tree.  960 1280

ullstein bild  

The Phillipines

The Phillipines

Filipinos celebrate the holidays with paper lanterns which are displayed on houses, office buildings and on streets. Tradition has it that the lanterns represent the victory of light over darkness.  960 1280

NOEL CELIS  

El Salvador

El Salvador

Many Latin American countries, including El Salvador, celebrate Christmas with pastorelas, plays that are similar to Christmas pageants, in which performers, often children, act out of biblical passages.  960 1280

AFP  

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Thousands of people attend San Jose’s annual Festival of Light parade in the Costa Rican capital. The parade features elaborate floats as well as costumed musicians and dancers.  960 1280

YURI CORTEZ  

Miami

Miami

Christmas in Miami includes the occasional Christmas Palm. 960 1280

Joe Raedle  

The Hot List

Explore America’s most stunning scenery.
Join the conversation on Social Media!
Stay updated on the latest travel tips and trends.
Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.