Best Places to Go Horseback Riding

From the coast of Hawaii to the mountains of Chile, explore our list of best places to go horseback riding.

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10: Skydiving

10: Skydiving

We don't need to tell you what an amazingly scary experience skydiving is; if you're looking to inject your vacation with pure adrenaline, this is the extreme. The weather is Thailand is good 365 days a year, so that means there is jumping every single day. Strap yourself to a jumpmaster, and experience the thrill of a lifetime. 960 1280

Max Dereta / Getty Images  

9: Zip Lining

9: Zip Lining

From the sea to the sky, our next adventure takes you through the canopies of the Chiang Mai rainforests. You'll ride in your single-person swing and cruise a cable suspended through the 1500-year old Thai rainforest. Upgrade from a single swing to the complete adventure package offered by Flight of the Gibbon, and you can rock climb, mountain bike and stay in authentic Thai village home stays. 960 1280

Matthew Micah Wright / Getty Images  

8: Sea Kayaking

8: Sea Kayaking

Since you're having so much fun enjoying Thailand's scenery and wildlife, why not do a little to preserve it? And, of course, still have fun. Sea Canoe is an eco-friendly company that has operated in Southern Thailand for over 18 years. With offices in Phuket, Krabi and Koh Samuir, Sea Canoe can offer adventures in Khao Sok, Trang and Tarutao. Their staff is knowledgeable, and they offer a multitude of locations for kayaking adventures, ranging from a few hours to over six days. 960 1280

kapulya / Getty Images  

7: Snorkeling

7: Snorkeling

Dive into the marine life just off the coast of Thailand. Similan Diving Safaris offers a full range of diving programs that will teach you how to explore reefs or get lost in the blue during an open-water dive. Located in Phang-Nga, you'll peacefully roam the underwater beauty of Similan and Surin Marine National Islands. 960 1280

ygrek / Getty Images  

6: Mountain Biking

6: Mountain Biking

Give the elephants a break and hit the Thai wilderness on two wheels. Mountain biking is supremely popular in this country and there are many different tours from which to choose. M.T. Hill Tours offers rides lasting from a few hours to a full day, but one of their more interesting tours takes place at night. Explore the bustling Bangkok City on a three-hour bike tour; the ride ends relatively early, so you can hit the town once you've turned in your bike. Just promise us you'll change out of your bike shorts. 960 1280

Patrick Foto / Getty Images  

5: Whitewater Rafting

5: Whitewater Rafting

Relatively new to the Thai tourist market, whitewater rafting is quickly being added to many adventure trek itineraries. Rush the rapids in Southern Thailand's Phang Na province, and you're guaranteed an exhilarating ride. Book with Phuket Tours, and you'll score a visit to the Ton Pariwat Wildlife Sanctuary and an elephant ride through the jungle. 960 1280

surabky / Getty Images  

4: Waterfall Abseiling

4: Waterfall Abseiling

Number 7 is perfect for those who find regular rock climbing or repelling to be a bit mundane. Throw in the force of a waterfall, and now you're talking adventure. Many hotels and travel guides have programs that allow you to abseil, or repel, down Thailand's beautiful and powerful waterfalls. You'll feel your heart in your chest as you lean over the edge of a 35-foot waterfall and the ground slowly slips beneath your feet. Find out more about waterfall abseiling at Doi Inthanon in Chiang Mai. 960 1280

JoyfulThailand / Getty Images  

3: Elephant Riding

3: Elephant Riding

Taking an elephant ride through local Thai villages and surrounding forests is an experience no visitor to Thailand should miss. The type and length of the ride can be catered specifically to you: a half-hour ride through a local village or a five-day trek through the jungles of Northern Thailand. Those with the endurance and the daring can even incorporate mountain biking and rafting into the trek. 960 1280

Frank Rothe / Getty Images  

2: Jungle Trekking

2: Jungle Trekking

Get intimate with the wilds of Thailand by hitting the unmarked trails. We recommend at least a three-day trek to see mountain ridges, rainforests and experience camping in the beautiful Thai wilderness. The folks at Active Thailand will provide an informed English-speaking guide who will pick you up at your Chiang Mai City hotel and arrange all your food and camping needs. You just need to bring dry socks, SPF and a sense of adventure. 960 1280

Kimberley Coole / Getty Images  

1: Caving

1: Caving

Get to the heart of Thailand by exploring ancient caves and tremendous caverns like those in the Pang Mapha District of the Mae Hong Son Province. Here you can venture underground and discover wildlife, history and geology. Expert guides, like those at Cave Lodge, will escort you through geologic labyrinths, vertical caves and collapsed caves. Combine your journey with forest hikes or rafting to see even more of the Thai landscape. 960 1280

Korawee Ratchapakdee / Getty Images  

Yaki Point

Yaki Point

Within the Grand Canyon take in the view from Yaki Point. From an elevation of 7,000 feet, you’ll see the rocky terrain dotted with pinyon pines and junipers -- trees with nuts that sustain wildlife such as deer, squirrels, ringtail and birds. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

South Kaibab Trail

South Kaibab Trail

The South Kaibab Trail leads to the Colorado River. Along with the Bright Angel Trail, the path provides a direct route to the bottom of the canyon. But with minimal shade, be sure to bring plenty of water and sun protection. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Mather Point

Mather Point

It took 6 million years for water to carve out the Grand Canyon. Get an expansive view of this handiwork at Mather Point -- where vibrant, ancient rock layers await, stretching back 1.7 billion years.  960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Tusayan Museum

Tusayan Museum

For nearly a millennia, Native American peoples have regarded the Grand Canyon as a sacred place. Visit the Tusayan Museum for a look into Pueblo Indian life at the canyon 800 years ago. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Yavapai Observation Station

Yavapai Observation Station

Without a power plant in sight, the Grand Canyon is home to some of the cleanest air in America. Check out an air quality monitoring stand, located outside the Yavapai Observation Station (pictured here).  960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Shiva Temple

Shiva Temple

See that broad, flat-topped plateau off in the distance? That’s Shiva Temple, a mesa about 1 mile long, with an area of about 300 acres. It’s located near the canyon’s North Rim. 960 1280

Pippawilson, flickr  

Kolb Studio

Kolb Studio

At the edge of Grand Canyon you’ll find Kolb Studio -- in the early 1900s, it was the home and photographic studio of outdoorsmen Emery and Ellsworth Kolb. Today, an art gallery operates inside the building, showcasing artwork from the canyon. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Bright Angel Lodge

Bright Angel Lodge

Bright Angel Lodge was built in 1935 to accommodate the increasing numbers of visitors coming to the canyon via train. The lodge’s rustic architecture of logs and stone was conceived by American architect Mary Colter. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Mule Corral

Mule Corral

These little guys -- call them “long-eared taxis” -- will take you on a cliff-hugging trip through the Grand Canyon. But relax, each mule goes through 1 year of training before it’s ever allowed to carry any passengers.  960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Trailview Overlook

Trailview Overlook

From Trailview Overlook you can look down at Bright Angel Trail -- the main route used for centuries to enter and leave the Grand Canyon. 960 1280

Rosa Say, flickr  

Trail of Time

Trail of Time

Discover the Grand Canyon’s geologic splendor. Take the Trail of Time, a nearly 3-mile-long interpretive walking trail, to peel back the pages of time -- as told through the landscape’s many rock layers. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Hopi House

Hopi House

Architect Mary Colter designed Hopi House in 1905. Today, this Pueblo-style building is the Grand Canyon’s largest gift store; it features a large selection of authentic Native American art and craftwork. The building is located in Grand Canyon Village on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. 960 1280

Al_HikesAZ, flickr  

Grand Canyon Depot

Grand Canyon Depot

Also within Grand Canyon Village: the Grand Canyon Depot -- one of 3 remaining railroad depots in the US built with logs. The depot opened in 1910, courtesy of Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway -- one of the largest railroads in the US at the time. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Roaring Springs

Roaring Springs

Nearly 5 miles down the Grand Canyon’s North Kaibab Trail you’ll find Roaring Springs. It’s one of several underground water supplies within the Grand Canyon. Listen closely … and hear the roar. 960 1280

Grand Canyon NPS, flickr  

Night Skies

Night Skies

Get out your telescope: The Grand Canyon offers prime nighttime skies for observing stars. Without a telephone pole or electric wire in sight, it’s just the starry skies above … and an awe-inspiring feeling within. 960 1280

Justin Kern, flickr  

Grand Canyon Skywalk

Grand Canyon Skywalk

And for the ultimate view, you’ve got to experience Grand Canyon Skywalk: this glass bridge walkway offers a jaw-dropping 4,000-foot-high view of the Grand Canyon’s floor. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Garden of Eden, Arches National Park

Garden of Eden, Arches National Park

Near the center of Arches National Park you’ll find the Garden of Eden -- so named because its rocky shapes resemble flowers and trees. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

North Window, Arches National Park

North Window, Arches National Park

This 90-foot-wide portal known as the North Window is one of many natural sandstone arches you’ll find at Arches National Park. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

Arches National Park is home to more than 2,000 natural sandstone arches. The 65-foot Delicate Arch is its most famous. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Arches National Park

Arches National Park

In addition to its famed arches, Arches National Park’s colorful geography includes maze-like narrow passages and tall rock columns. You can find this view directly opposite the Delicate Arch. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Hiking at Arches

Hiking at Arches

Two hikers journey back from the Delicate Arch. The three-mile trail (round-trip) is moderately strenuous, and takes roughly 30 to 45 minutes each way. Bring plenty of water! 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Sand Dune Arch

Sand Dune Arch

Enjoy a shaded rest from the Moab desert sun. This trail at Arches National Park leads through deep sand; a secluded arch, Sand Dune Arch, waits up ahead. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Wolfe Ranch Cabin

Wolfe Ranch Cabin

In the late 1800s, a Civil War veteran named John Wesley Wolfe and his son built this one-room cabin in what is now Arches National Park. For more than 10 years, Wolfe lived on this rugged ranch, where the area’s water and desert grassland were enough to sustain a few cattle. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park

Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park

The Moab area is also home to Canyonlands National Park. Erosion over millions of years produced the many canyons, buttes and mesas -- including Mesa Arch. 960 1280

Alex Proimos, flickr  

Hell’s Revenge

Hell’s Revenge

Ready to take on Hell’s Revenge? This steep slick rock trail may make your pulse race as you tackle its hair-raising descents on a Razor ride. It’s located in the Sand Flats Recreation Area, a sandstone plateau of slick rock domes, bowls and fins. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Porcupine Rim Trail

Porcupine Rim Trail

A mountain biker tackles Porcupine Rim Trail, one of two trails within the Sand Flats Recreation Area. The steep, rocky terrain, which stretches nearly 15 miles, challenges even the most experienced mountain bikers. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Moab Cowboy

Moab Cowboy

Meet the Moab Cowboy -- that's what locals call Kent Green. For more than 20 years, Green served as a deputy sheriff and search-and-rescue commander in the Moab area. Today, he leads off-road adventures. His no. 1 rule: Never travel alone. 960 1280

Lisa Singh   

Moab Dinosaur Footprints

Moab Dinosaur Footprints

Check out these fossilized dinosaur footprints during a Razor ride through the Sand Flats Recreation Area with the Moab Cowboy. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Big Bend Recreation Area

Big Bend Recreation Area

Moab is a rock climber’s dream. Enjoy bouldering at the Big Bend Recreation Area along the Colorado River, northeast of Moab. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Colorado River

Colorado River

Take in the view of the Colorado River from Scenic Byway 128, with awe-inspiring views of red standstone cliffs just beyond. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Fisher Towers, Colorado River

Fisher Towers, Colorado River

River guide Arne Hultquist leads a whitewater rafting trip through the Fishers Tower section of the Colorado River. The area comprises a series of towers made of sandstone; they’re named after a miner who lived in the area in the 1880s. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Matrimony Spring

Matrimony Spring

Fill up at Matrimony Spring, a natural spring along Byway 128. Legend has it that anyone who drinks from the spring will continue to return to Moab. The water that issues forth begins its journey as snowmelt from the La Sal Mountains, 20 miles southeast of Moab. 960 1280

Lisa Singh  

Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point

Get ready to say “wow” at Dead Horse Point. The park features a stunning overlook of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park. The area also served as the final film scene for the 1991 classic "Thelma & Louise." 960 1280

Mike Nielsen, flickr  

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