The World's Best Rooftop Bars

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Best Cities and Must-Stops

Selection of frosted donuts
Ocean City, N.J.

Ocean City, N.J.

There’s no place like the beach for indulging a sweet tooth. A short walk along the boardwalk will turn up at least a dozen shops selling everything from soft serve ice cream to chocolate fudge, even funnel cake. A recent InfoGroup survey ranked Ocean City, N.J. as the top U.S. town for sweets lovers given the number of bakeries, candy shops and ice cream parlors around town. Make a stop at Shriver’s on the boardwalk for a beach town must, salt water taffy. Another can’t-miss spot is Aunt Betty’s Ice Cream Shack. Yum-o. 960 1280

Shriver's Salt Water Taffy & Fudge   

St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada

St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada

It’s been called the unofficial national food and the place to get your donut fix when in Canada is St. Catharines, Ontario. With more donut shops per capita than any other country in the world, donut lovers may have a hard time choosing where to go and which kind to choose. You can’t go wrong at award-winning Beechwood Doughnuts, which offers nearly 20 different donuts each day, including lemon poppy seed and apple fritter, a favorite donut variety in Canada. 960 1280

Beechwood Doughnuts   

Zurich, Switzerland

Zurich, Switzerland

It should come as no surprise to see Zurich on a list of top cities for sweets lovers. Home to Lindt & Sprungli, one of the most famous chocolatiers in the world, chocolate truffles are for sale on nearly every corner. Whether you prefer milk chocolate or dark chocolate, be sure to take in the smells at the factory outlet before indulging in free chocolate samples. No wonder the Chocolate Manufacturers Association ranks Switzerland as leading the world in chocolate consumption at 18.1 pounds per person. 960 1280

Bloomberg, Getty Images  

Long Beach, California

Long Beach, California

Ice cream lovers, go west to Long Beach, California where residents eat more ice cream than those in any other city in the country. Try Long Beach Creamery, an ice cream shop known for its organic, handcrafted ice cream. Go for flavors not found anywhere else, like goat cheese whiskey fig and blueberry donut. Stop in for a scoop, a pint or even an ice cream cake, which comes with step-by-step care instructions. Another local favorite is Paradis where a scoop of salted caramel fudge is absolute heaven. 960 1280

Long Beach Creamery   

Orlando, Florida

Orlando, Florida

The Dole Whip may be tops at Walt Disney World, but there are many more sweet treats to be found in Orlando. Shari’s Berries recently ranked Orlando as the top city for sweet tooths given the variety of cupcake shops, ice cream parlors and candy stores around town. Try Blue Bird Bake Shop, a retro-style bakery boasting treats like chocolate cherry cordial cupcakes and butterscotch pecan blondies. Or, visit Se7en Bites for handmade whoopee pies and Swiss rolls. 960 1280

Blue Bird Bake Shop   

Salt Lake City, Utah

Salt Lake City, Utah

Chocolate shops abound in Salt Lake City, especially artisan chocolates, which have really taken off in the last five to 10 years in Utah. So, can it come as any surprise that The Hershey Co. named Utah the Sweet Tooth Capital of America? While Twizzlers are tops in Salt Lake City, it’s the chocolate shops, like Hatch Family Chocolates and Cummings Studio Chocolates, that really draw the crowds. Go for boxed chocolates, frozen hot chocolate, chocolate milkshakes, even chocolate-dipped caramel apples. 960 1280

Hatch Family Chocolates  

Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

Denmark consistently ranks among the happiest nations in the world. Maybe it’s because they also eat more candy than those living in any other country (36 pounds per year). Among their favorite sweets is flodeboller, a chocolate-covered cream puff, which is tops in Copenhagen. Many bakeries sell flodeboller, but Laura Berg at The Copenhagen Tales taste-tested this treat to save you time and shared where to get the best flodeboller in Copenhagen (spoiler: her clear winners were Mette Blomsterberg and Lagkagehuset). 960 1280

Sarah Bossert  

Shanghai, China

Shanghai, China

Home to one of China’s oldest and largest ice cream factories, Yi Min No.1 Foods, it was a must to include Shanghai on a list of top cities for sweet tooths. One-third of all in cream bought around the world is consumed in China. Try Pree, a sophisticated ice cream “lounge” that boasts soft serve flavors like lemon grass ginger and porter beer. Another top pick is Gracie’s. Flavors range from the traditional, like rocky road, to signature flavors with a twist, like black sesame & honey. Even better, they deliver. 960 1280

Smart Shanghai   

Franklin, Tennessee

Franklin, Tennessee

With more bakeries than nearly any other city in the U.S., Franklin is the place to go for baked treats, like cupcakes and donuts, even paleo donuts. Head to Five Daughters Bakery to get your sugar fix while in town. Specialty flavors vary by week, but include peaches & cream and peanut butter & jealous. There’s even a live Donut Cam on their website to get up close and personal with the donuts of the day. If you fancy pies instead, head to Buttermilk Sky Pie Shop for Nancy’s Pecan Pie. 960 1280

Five Daughters Bakery   

Myrtle Beach, SC

Myrtle Beach, SC

For colorful sugar shops that sell all kinds of candies, from jellybeans to bubble gum to gummy bears, head to Myrtle Beach. Home to both I Love Sugar and IT'SUGAR, you’ll find more candy inside each shop than you’ve ever seen. They’ve got giant versions of favorites, like Kit Kat bars and Air Heads, as well as international treats, like Pocky, chocolate-covered biscuit sticks from Japan. Kid may find themselves walking the stores wide-eyed taking in all the sweet deliciousness, but then, so will adults. 960 1280

Erin Gifford  

Juhu Beach Club in Oakland, California
Oakland, California

Oakland, California

Whether you’re craving Thai, Japanese, Mexican or Halal, Oakland has you covered. Estately recently mapped U.S. food preferences with the help of Yelp and found that Oakland ranked high in the top-five in nearly every category of international restaurant, even food trucks. Clearly they’ve got something going on when it comes to world cuisines. Try Juhu Beach Club, an Indian restaurant that puts a creative twist on traditional recipes. The JBC Pavs (sliders) and the bhel salad are must-trys. 960 1280

Rachel Renee Photography / Visit Oakland  

Orlando, Florida

Orlando, Florida

Orlando has more food trucks than any other city in the U.S., according to data compiled by Business Insider. A favorite is Jamaica Jamaica, which serves up to-go food with a Caribbean flair. Or, take a stroll along International Drive for your pick of Greek, Italian, even Ethiopian. Order up a pho bowl at Little Saigon or try the ceviches and tapas at Cuba Libre. Then, of course, there’s Epcot, which boasts flavors from nearly a dozen countries, including Norway, Japan, Mexico and Germany. 960 1280

Visit Orlando   

Los Angeles, California

Los Angeles, California

In Los Angeles, there’s a section of town for just about every type of cuisine. A few to look for include Koreatown, Little Tokyo, Tehrangeles, Little Armenia and Thai Town. It’s even been ranked as among the most diverse cities in America. Try the short ribs at Genwa Korean BBQ or the spicy lamb noodles at Jitladala. Or, head the Grand Central Market in downtown Los Angeles where you’ll find everything from falafel at Madcapra to carnitas at Villa Moreliana. 960 1280

Joshua Lurie   

Portland, Oregon

Portland, Oregon

Portland's food truck scene (or, as they say in Portland, food cart) is the stuff of legend with more than 500 food carts all across town. It's so big in Portland that there are “pods” around town, like Rose City Food Park, with multiple food carts offering up cuisines from all over the world. Before you go, visit Food Carts Portland for maps and tour dates. Among the most popular carts is Nong’s Khao Man Gai, which boasts simple yet delicious chicken and rice dishes from Bangkok. 960 1280

Travel Portland   

Houston, Texas

Houston, Texas

When Anthony Bourdain goes to Houston, his first stop isn’t for barbecue or Tex-Mex. Not long ago, he filmed an episode of his popular series, “Parts Unknown,” and made stops at Udipi Café for vegetarian Indian cuisine and Himalaya, which serves up flavorful Indian and Pakistani dishes. Or, try Helen Greek Food and Wine where their Sunday Brunch is a favorite. Order the Greek Taverna Benedict and a Trojan Horse, a refreshing morning cocktail made with sparkling wine, lemon and cherry. 960 1280

Helen Greek Food and Wine   

Queens, New York City

Queens, New York City

In New York City’s most diverse borough, Queens, more than 135 different languages are spoken, so it’s no surprise that the food and restaurant choices are just as diverse. In Flushing’s Chinatown, you’ll find regional cuisines from all parts of China. Go to Fu Ran for Dongbei-style dishes or head to Sifu Chio for Cantonese cuisine. For Thai, Thai Rock is a favorite for creative dishes and refreshing cocktails. Try the Pad Kee Maow with Chicken and a Mango Frozen Dackery. 960 1280

Thai Rock   

Chicago, Illinois

Chicago, Illinois

The international flavors in Chicago are as diverse as the people who set up the distinctive neighborhoods all across the city. You’ll find Irish, Mexican and German, as well as Costa Rican, Swedish and Nepalese. On the West Side, head to Jim’s Original for a Polish Sausage Sandwich before indulging your sweet tooth with traditional Greek pastries, like Baklava and Kataifi, at Artopolis. Or, go to the North Side for Middle Eastern and Asian cuisines. The Crazy Squid at Asian fusion-style Fat Rice is a must-try. 960 1280

Choose Chicago   

Boston, Massachusetts

Boston, Massachusetts

Whether you’re craving Vietnamese, Italian or Irish food, take-out is just a phone call away with more than 40 world cuisines offered to-go at restaurants all around Boston. Pick up the Drunken Noodles at Pho Basil (considered by many to be the best in Boston) or bring home an order of Penne Puttanesca from Artu, a popular Italian eatery in the North End. If you prefer to dine in, try The Beehive for a mix of flavors. The Lamb Moussaka and Seafood Ceviche are local favorites. 960 1280

Joey Marion   

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

In a city where nearly every country in the world has its own embassy, you’ll find that most every cuisine is also represented. The Washington Post even compiled a listing of the most essential dishes, like Unagidon (a Japanese rice bowl featuring barbecued eel) at Donburi and the Lebanese-style Falafel Burger at Zaytinya. Ethiopian cuisine is also well-known in Washington, DC. Order the Veggie Combo at Zenebech Injera, which comes with lentils, shiro, tomato salad, collard greens and traditional flatbread. 960 1280

Zenebech Injera   

Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia

When you’re hungry, there’s so much to choose from in Atlanta and Buford Highway is the place to go. This international corridor is jam-packed with cuisines of all kinds, from Indian to Greek to Soul, one right next to the other. You’ll even find restaurants boasting dishes from Nigeria, Nepal and Jamaica. Try the Bun Rieu (crab noodle soup) at Chateau Saigon or stop in Las Delicias de la Abuela for a Sunday brunch filled with traditional Colombian flavors. 960 1280

Marion Liou / We Love Bu Hi  

dining al fresco, West Village, New York City
New York City

New York City

At sidewalk tables, rooftop decks and charming backyard gardens, New Yorkers take advantage of see-and-be-seen outdoor dining hot spots in trendy neighborhoods such as Brooklyn, the Lower East Side and the West Village. Or they enjoy casual meals with Hudson River views at the Upper West Side's Boat Basin Cafe. 960 1280

Rachel Lewis/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images   

San Francisco

San Francisco

Even though San Fran can be chilly in summer, locals armed with lightweight jackets and scarves fill restaurant patios and decks. Head to the colorful Castro District or the funky Mission District. If you prefer bay views, the pier-side restaurants at Embarcadero won't disappoint. 960 1280

Philip Lee Harvey/Cultura/Getty Images   

Montreal

Montreal

Outdoor charm is in abundance at many of Montreal's cozy neighborhood eateries. City blocks in Old Montreal and Outremont morph into outdoor block parties as strings of cafes and restaurants pop up on sidewalks and street corners and servers bustle about carrying trays full of poutine and glasses of wine. 960 1280

Joanne Levesque/Moment Mobile/Getty Images  

Sydney

Sydney

When a city is home to one of the world's most iconic waterfronts — complete with the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge — it's no wonder that outdoor waterfront dining is all the rage. Enjoy a cold beer with local Aussies at one of the restaurants lining Sydney Harbour's wharfs, or, better yet, head to oceanfront neighborhoods such as Bondi and Manly Beach. 960 1280

Dapa/Tourism Australia  

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires exudes a sort of decaying elegance that makes the so-called Paris of South America a wildly romantic spot for outdoor dining. Join the crowds of porteños that fill cafes and bars lining the Plaza Serrano and Plaza Armenia in the uber-hip Palermo neighborhood. For a more upscale treat, head to the restaurants along the shady, tree-lined streets of Recoleta. 960 1280

Rachel Lewis/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images   

Paris

Paris

Hemingway and his expat cronies knew what they were doing when they flocked to Paris' countless cafes to sip strong coffee and even stronger cocktails. Whether you cozy up to tables at the iconic Les Deux Magots and Cafe de Flore or wander the side streets of the Marais and the sprawling Boulevard St.-Germain, the perfect outdoor bistro lies within easy reach. 960 1280

Stuart Dee/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images  

Rome

Rome

Though you'll be bumping elbows with tourists aplenty, the restaurants lining Rome's piazzas offer some of the city's most scenic dining. Order an apertivo while sitting at a table that overlooks Bernini sculptures in Piazza Navona, the flower market in Campo de' Fiori, or the Pantheon in Piazza della Rotonda.  960 1280

Buena Vista Images/The Image Bank/Getty Images  

Madrid

Madrid

You'd be remiss not to order a slew of tasty tapas at one of Madrid's popular outdoor eateries and bars. You'll feel as if you’re a part of Spanish tradition while dining at a table overlooking Plaza de Santa Ana or Plaza Mayor, 2 of the city's must-see attractions. 960 1280

David C Tomlinson/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images   

Chicago

Chicago

Don't be put off by the Windy City's moniker; in summer, there's hardly a better city for outdoor dining. Whether you're in Lakeview, Lincoln Park or River North and beyond, Chicago's beer gardens, patios and rooftop restaurants and bars are ideal places for enjoying brunch or dinner with city views throughout the summer. 960 1280

Adam Alexander Photography  

Singapore

Singapore

Singapore is a foodie's dream. Delicious, exotic local cuisine lurks throughout the city's many nooks and crannies, but it is most easily (and cheaply) enjoyed at Singapore's famous food streets, such as Smith Street, and sprawling hawker centers (open-air food courts), such as Lau Pa Sat. 960 1280

Nicky Loh/Bloomberg/Getty Images  

Café Tortoni, Buenos Aires
Cafe Tortoni, Buenos Aires

Cafe Tortoni, Buenos Aires

As Argentina’s oldest cafe, this historic hangout has been a gathering spot for artists, politicians and musicians since the late 1800s. You can’t leave without ordering the local favorite -- chocolate con churros, crunchy fried dough dipped into thick hot chocolate. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Cafe Central, Vienna

Cafe Central, Vienna

A Viennese institution since 1876, this palatial coffeehouse has been a meeting place for some of the world’s greatest minds, from Sigmund Freud to Leon Trotsky. True to Viennese cafe culture, you’ll want to linger for hours in this grand cafe. 960 1280

Torsten Mangner, flickr  

Sant'Eustachio il Caffe, Rome

Sant'Eustachio il Caffe, Rome

Founded in 1938, this small stand-up cafe is a landmark in the heart of Rome, near the city’s iconic Piazza Navona. Drinking espresso standing up is the equivalent of to-go coffee for Italians. No matter how much time you have, order the local favorite "gran caffè speciale,” a shot of sweetened espresso.  960 1280

Michiel Jelijs, flickr  

La Cafeotheque, Paris

La Cafeotheque, Paris

While many cafes in Paris focus on atmosphere more than the coffee, this spot is one of the exceptions. Coffee aficionados, Parisian hipsters and tourists alike all gather at this cafe for the best beans from all over the world, which are roasted in-house. 960 1280

Premshree Pillai, flickr  

Winkel, Amsterdam

Winkel, Amsterdam

A favorite of locals and tourists alike, this charming corner café is known for its appeltaart (Dutch apple pie). But it’s also a great spot to sip on coffee, especially because of the outdoor seating, with its front-row view of the bustling farmers market nearby.  960 1280

Kathleen Rellihan  

Toma Cafe, Madrid

Toma Cafe, Madrid

To keep up with this high-energy city, you’ll need plenty of caffeine. The locals head to this tiny bustling café to refuel with favorites such as cafe con leche (espresso with milk) and alfajores (caramel biscuit sweet). 960 1280

Yukino Miyazawa, flickr  

Kaffeine, London

Kaffeine, London

While the caffeinated beverage of choice in London is tea, coffee (good coffee, too) can still be found in this city. Inspired by the cafes in Australia and New Zealand, this independent coffee spot is always packed with those in search of an expertly brewed cup of java.  960 1280

elisabet.s, flickr  

Caffe Vita, Seattle

Caffe Vita, Seattle

Virtually anywhere you go in Seattle, you’re an arm’s length away from a great cup of coffee. So if you ask a Seattleite where to find the best coffee, be prepared for a lengthy list in response. A local favorite, this cafe specializes in small-batch coffee roasting and even offers the general public a chance to learn the secret to its artisanal brewing with its Public Brewing School. 960 1280

Kathleen Rellihan   

Reslau, Auckland

Reslau, Auckland

New Zealand invented and perfected the country’s signature coffee drink -- the flat white, a shot of espresso blended with steamed milk, no froth. This award-winning cafe is one of the best spots in Auckland to enjoy an expertly crafted flat white topped off with a home-baked treat. 960 1280

Moira Clunie, flickr  

Double Tall, Japan

Double Tall, Japan

While you might think that the Japanese drink green tea all day, coffee is becoming more and more popular in this country, especially with the younger generations. While the iconic vending machine is a popular way to get your caffeine fix to-go, there is a small band of quality coffee shops in Tokyo, with Double Tall leading the pack. Known for its latte art, the coffee’s presentation -- and taste -- will wow you. 960 1280

Cloganese, flickr  

Koval Distillery in Chicago
St. George Spirits; Alameda, California

St. George Spirits; Alameda, California

St. George is stretching the boundaries of traditional styles of gin, very successfully. More than 30 years ago, a young German man named Jorg Rupf fell in love with the Bay Area’s food culture and the quality of fruit growing in California, and subsequently founded St. George Spirits in 1982. He began making eau de vie (a clear, colorless fruit brandy) from pears, raspberries, cherries, and even kiwi fruit before there was a craft distillation movement in the U.S. to speak of. A lot of early gin distillers here kept to a London Dry style, which is very juniper-forward, but as the editor of Bevvy.co notes, now distillers are creating modern gins that are a lot more diverse. “Citrus peel is one of the botanicals that has come to the forefront, and local herbs and spices are becoming popular with people who want to make gin with a bit of hometown pride. St. George Terroir Gin is a great example of that, it tastes like the California coast.” 960 1280

  

Koval Distillery; Chicago, Illinois

Koval Distillery; Chicago, Illinois

The first distillery in Chicago since well before Prohibition, Koval was founded by a dynamic husband and wife duo who are changing the way America distills. Dr. Robert Birnecker and Dr. Sonat Birnecker-Hart have won countless awards for their dry gins, 100 percent Midwestern grown organic rye whiskey, millet-based bourbon, and more. The power couple also prioritizes education, hosting a selection of cocktail classes and whiskey workshops at their North Ravenswood Ave location. Talent seems to run in the family—their distinctive laser-cut labels have also received a lot of attention, designed by Sonat’s sister and her firm Dando Projects. 960 1280

Jaclyn Simpson  

Seven Stills; San Francisco, California

Seven Stills; San Francisco, California

Tim and Clint of Seven Stills Distillery started out by coming at everything backwards—no one was pushing whiskey from the beer angle, but a huge craft beer segment in the San Francisco Bay Area along with their extensive beer knowledge provided a nice segue into making whiskey from extremely high-quality craft brew. Now their robust road map of spirits includes “a still for every hill” in San Francisco using a different artist to design each bottle (Chocasmoke is made from a chocolate-oatmeal stout in honor of Twin Peaks, and Fluxuate is distilled from a coffee porter to celebrate a rapidly-changing, post-Gold Rush Rincon Hill), to add to their collection of small-batch, seasonal bitters like Meyer lemon, prickly pear, and cranberry. 960 1280

  

Clear Creek; Portland, Oregon

Clear Creek; Portland, Oregon

For the past three decades, Clear Creek Distillery has been honoring the intimate marriage between farming and distilling, utilizing the world-class fruit from the farms around their Portland, Oregon home base. Well known for its eau de vie (a clear, colorless fruit brandy), Clear Creek’s diverse portfolio of more than 25 products rivals the best of their European counterparts, and is anchored by the flagship Williams Pear Brandy, which has been named one of the top spirits in the world. 960 1280

  

House Spirits Distillery; Portland, Oregon

House Spirits Distillery; Portland, Oregon

Beloved and very well respected in the industry, House Spirits Distillery is making whiskeys that have been listed among the best in their categories. Their Westward Oregon Straight Malt Whiskey matures in new American oak barrels for at least two years, allowing Oregon’s dry, hot summers and wet, cold winters to contribute to its rich, smooth flavor. Accompanied by Aviation American Gin, Krogstad Aquavit, and Volstead Vodka, almost everything in their line of spirits is ideal for mixing a cocktail. Their new distillery and tasting room on Portland’s famous distillery row opened to the public in November 2015, and hosts regular classes on making whiskey, cocktails, and bitters. 960 1280

  

Kings County Distillery; Brooklyn, New York

Kings County Distillery; Brooklyn, New York

The founders of Kings County Distillery quite literally wrote the book on making whiskey a thome. Their Guide to Urban Moonshining is a look at America’s indigenous spirt, from the whiskey made by the early colonists and sprawling distilleries of Kentucky to the adventurous, modern-day craft distillers across almost every state. This is all quite fitting, as they run NewYork City’s oldest operating whiskey distillery, the first since Prohibition, located in the iconic Brooklyn Navy Yard and just steps from the legendary site of the Brooklyn Whiskey Wars of the 1860s. Their moonshine, bourbon, peated bourbon, and barrel strength bourbon have all won numerous awards, along with their recent accolade of being named Distillery of the Year in 2016 from the American Distilling Institute. 960 1280

Valery Rizzo  

Corsair Distillery; Nashville, Tennessee

Corsair Distillery; Nashville, Tennessee

Corsair founders Darek and Andrew are Nashville natives who have been collaborating since high school. They began by home brewing beer and wine in Darek’s garage, but soon decided that whiskey would be “much more satisfying.” Their adventurous, innovative, and big-flavored craft whiskeys—including a quinoa whiskey, a handful of rye whiskeys, some malt whiskeys, and more—consistently receive high marks among respectable critics, along with countless international spirit awards. Ones to try: Triple Smoke Malt Whiskey and Wry Moon Unaged Rye Whiskey. 960 1280

Andrea Behrends  

Few Spirits; Evanston, Illinois

Few Spirits; Evanston, Illinois

Named after suffragette and temperance advocate Frances Elizabeth Willard (FEW), Few Spirits is a true grass-to-grain distillery, sourcing all of their grain (corn, wheat, rye, and barley) from no more than 150 miles away. It is also the first (legal) alcohol-production facility of any kind in Evanston, a city that banned alcohol sales for four decades beyond the end of Prohibition. Their bottles show up everywhere among the craft spirit community, and their rye whiskey has received acclaim as Whisky Advocate’s 2013 Craft Whiskey of the Year, as a gold medal winner in the 2014 World Whisky Awards, and was rated one of the top five whiskies in the world by the Beverage Tasting Institute. 960 1280

  

Death's Door Spirits; Middleton, Wisconsin

Death's Door Spirits; Middleton, Wisconsin

What was once a robust potato farming region, Washington Island, Wisconsin fell prey to vertical integration in the potato industry in the early 1970s. More than 30 years later, two brothers started growing wheat on the island and soon Death’s Door Spirits was born, focusing from the beginning on how to support local and sustainable agriculture on the island. Death’s Door pioneered white whisky, which became very popular as a cocktail ingredient, featuring an 80:20 ratio of Washington Island Wheat to malted barley from Chilton, Wisconsin. Other Death’s Door family members include a London Dry style gin, a double-distilled vodka, and Wondermint Schnapps Liqueur—the first and only artisan craft peppermint schnapps in the world. 960 1280

  

Montanya Distillers; Crested Butte, Colorado

Montanya Distillers; Crested Butte, Colorado

Montanya Distillers are best known as purveyors of high-altitude craft rum, distilled in the breathtaking Rocky Mountains. Not surprisingly, their ingredients list reads as an ode to America’s inspiring outdoor beauty: Non-GMO sugar cane from family farmers in Louisiana who grow and mill for them; water from one of the purest spring and snowmelt charged aquifers in the USA; and they even heat their building from the alembic copper pot stills. Award-winning Montanya Platino and Oro rums are joined by a limited-release Exclusiva rum that is aged for 30 months in American white oak barrels and then finished in French oak barrels that previously held Sutcliffe Vineyards’ Port. 960 1280

  

Best Bars in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavik is fast becoming one of the hottest nightlife destinations in the world, thanks in large part to its walkability, friendly local vibe, and blossoming craft beer scene. “We have this one street called 'Laugavegur' where you will find a jungle of unique bars, food trucks, restaurants, cocktail lounges and wild nightclubs,” said Dan Petursson, the cofounder of Wake Up Reykjavik, a food and bar tour company in the city. And the best part is, you'll have plenty of time to explore them all, as bars don't close until 4:30 a.m. in the Icelandic capital. 960 1280

D.Voloz&J.Stivelman[2016]  

Bangkok, Thailand

Bangkok, Thailand

Bangkok is one of the more oft-mentioned cities among the best cities for nightlife in the world--and for good reason. Perhaps a lovely side effect of the incredible food scene, the craft cocktail scene is equally as world class. Make sure to check out Maggie Choo’s, with its swanky 1930s vibe and frequent use of dry ice. Also stop by Skybar (pictured above) for some of the best views in the city. 960 1280

  

London, England

London, England

Each year Drinks International rates the 50 Best Bars in the World, and last year London scored nine awards, including four out of the top 10, and the #1 overall, Artesian. For this reason, it’s safe to say that the city may be the absolute best city for bars in the world. “Mixology has elevated the best cocktail-making to a form of science,” said Paul Gauger, executive vice president of VisitBritain, “with drinks served up in everything from tin cans to bowler hats.” His recommendation? Lounge Bohemia, particularly if you’re a fan of Instagram-worthy cocktails. 960 1280

Jason Hawkes  

New York, New York

New York, New York

NYC has six out of the top 50 bars in the world, according to Drinks International, including The Dead Rabbit Grocery & Grog, Employees Only, and Attaboy. “There is something for everyone,” said Caroline Peck, senior manager of communications at NYC & Company. “Sip a popsicle cocktail on a rooftop overlooking the Hudson River; sample a brew made within the five boroughs at a local neighborhood bar; or speak a secret passcode to enter a modern-day speakeasy.” 960 1280

Marley White  

Hong Kong, China

Hong Kong, China

When you think of the best cities for bars in the world, Hong Kong might not be one of the first that comes to mind; but it should, particularly if you love rooftop bars. Hong Kong’s skyline is stunning, and restaurateurs have responded by providing residents and visitors alike with not only stunning views, but equally as stunning beverage options. For a truly amazing experience, check out Eyebar or SEVVA Taste Bar. Just don’t look down. 960 1280

Loïc Lagarde  

Melbourne, Australia

Melbourne, Australia

Tucked away in the southeast corner of the continent is what many consider to be Australia’s arts capital. “Melbourne is renowned around the world for the numerous small and quirky bars that can be stumbled upon in any of the 180 laneways,” said John O’Sullivan at Tourism Australia. If you stumble upon anything, stumble upon Black Pearl, which was rated the 10th best bar in the world in 2015 by Drinks International. 960 1280

Kristoffer Paulsen  

San Francisco, California

San Francisco, California

With nearby Silicon Valley, it only seems fitting that San Francisco also has some of the most social-media-worthy bars in the world. “San Francisco has always been a center of innovation and culinary excellence,” said Laurie Armstrong of San Francisco Travel. “Anything having to do with food and drink here rises to a whole different level.” Try Bourbon and Branch, Smuggler’s Cove, and Bar Agricole for a truly Golden Gate experience. 960 1280

Can Balcioglu  

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

“I think mixology has improved a lot in the last couple of years,” said Rodrigo Mello, the main bartender at Belmond Copacabana Palace. And the reason? “The re-discovery of fresh, seasonal, local ingredients.” Make sure to try Brazil’s national cocktail, the caipirinha, made with sugar cane hard liquor (called cachaça), sugar and lime. 960 1280

Christian Knepper / Embratur  

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires embraces much of its Spanish heritage when it comes to drinking culture: The party starts later in the evening, and doesn’t end until early in the morning. Many cafes serve alcohol and don't miss two things Argentina is renowned for: a chopp (pint) of craft beer or a glass of Malbec. Be sure to check out The Harrison Speakeasy, Lo de Roberto, and Doppleganger. 960 1280

  

Singapore

Singapore

The world’s only island city-state, the Republic of Singapore is also one of the cultural capitals of the world, which has created a food and bar scene unlike anything else. “Singapore is a melting pot of cultures, which affords bars access to wide-ranging ingredients,” said Kershing Goh of the Singapore Tourism Board. “The demand for artfully prepared cocktails has driven an alluring arsenal of artisan spirits by independent distilleries.” We agree: Singapore is in a drinking league of its own. 960 1280

Photographer: WarrenWee/WWP  

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

There is an absolute dedication to technique in craft cocktails in Japan. “Purity is the backbone of the Tokyo beverage experience, and bartenders take their work as seriously as chefs,” said Steven Hall of City of Tokyo Tourism. “The ingredient comes first and the balance of flavor is important. As with all things Japanese, there must be a sense of harmony.” Try Gen Yamamoto for the true Tokyo experience. 960 1280

  

Tel Aviv, Israel

Tel Aviv, Israel

Tel Aviv has one bar for every 230 residents in the city. Make sure to try Imperial Craft, which was named the 17th best bar in the world by Drinks International. Also, order an Arak or Goldstar beer. According to Yadin Katz, of the Tel Aviv Mayor’s Office, they’re a must-have. 960 1280

Maremagnum / Getty Images  

Belgrade, Serbia

Belgrade, Serbia

According to the Tourist Organization of Belgrade’s Jelena Stankovic, bars serve many functions in the Serbian capital, the most important of which being bureaucratic. “In the (un)official history of Belgrade, the most important political and economic decisions have been made in bars and ‘kafanas,’ which is an old word for a restaurant or tavern.” As a result, the city’s more than 3,000 bars and restaurants are held to the highest standards. Check out Bajloni Bar and its charming garden patio if visiting in the summer. 960 1280

Dragan Obric  

Berlin, Germany

Berlin, Germany

While certainly a destination for all kinds of drinkers, Berlin is perhaps best known for its beer culture. “Berlin has transformed into a center for microbreweries that produce a variety of craft beer from India Pale Ale to pilsner and lager,” said a spokesperson for Visit Berlin. For a truly fantastical experience, check out The Fairytale Bar, where butterflies may pop out of the "talking" drinks menu, and you can order such cocktails as “The Frog King,” “Black Knight,” and “The Wise Counselor.” 960 1280

www.koschel.de  

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The drinking scene in the Netherlands capital is definitely worth venturing halfway around the world for. Make sure to spring for something with the centuries-old Jonge Jenever (Dutch gin) in it and also a pint from the Brouwerij De Prael. The best place to start? Tales & Spirits, which was rated the 30th best bar in the world by Drinks International. 960 1280

  

Beers on Tap in Omaha
San Francisco Bay Area, California

San Francisco Bay Area, California

While San Francisco proper has been on the beer map for a bit, its new suite of craft breweries is shaking things up daily. IPAs are still king, boasting a flavor profile that is something so very Californian, but sours are moving in quickly. Many brewers are moving away from the strictly hoppy stuff that has been done before and are playing around with Belgian styles, sours, and rustic farmhouse ales, which are all making their way onto the scene in full force. Laughing Monk in the city’s Bayview district is working with local community gardens to create one-off beers that connect with the neighborhood and bring urban agriculture to the forefront of their persona. Their Bayview Gold adds chamomile at the end of the boil, giving it a soft floral aroma and light pineapple citrus flavor. This fall they’ll add local pumpkin to the Imperial Belgian stout. Their neighbors next door in San Francisco’s new Urban Point area, Seven Stills Brewery & Distillery, are distilling beer into whiskey, while also brewing their own and creating a virtuous circle they call a “Beerception: A Beer Within a Beer Within a Beer”— a beer that has been aged in a whiskey barrel that was made from that same beer. The Rare Barrel in Berkeley recently took home awards for its Apropos of Nothing and Ensorcelled – both American-style sour ales, and Headlands Brewing Co. in Mill Valley won accolades for its Pt. Bonita Rustic Lager. 960 1280

Courtesy of Laughing Monk Brewing  

Bend, Oregon

Bend, Oregon

In laid-back Central Oregon, Bend is proving that big brother Portland isn’t the only city in this Northwestern powerhouse brewing state worthy of acclaim. The Deschutes Brewery overlooks the river of the same name, and is home to their adventurous lineup of pioneering beers—from the hoppy Bond Street series to the experimental, small-batch Reserve series. The Ale Apothecary ferments beers in old oak trees that they hollow out themselves. 10 Barrel Brewing Co. took home a prize at last year’s Great American Beer Festival for its Crush Cucumber Sour, as did Bend Brewing Co. for its creation in the same category of German-style sour ales called Volkskeet. When hunger sets in, head to the North Rim Brew Pub in the Old Mill District for good brews and good eats. 960 1280

Courtesy of Deschutes Brewery  

Seattle, Washington

Seattle, Washington

Although Washington is often known for wine, the beer scene in Seattle is nothing to sneeze at. Not surprising since the state is one of the top in the country for growing hops. Ghostfish Brewing Co. won awards for its Ghostfish Grapefruit IPA and Watchstander Stout (both gluten-free beers) at the Great American Beer Festival in 2015. Rueben’s Brews Taproom took home honors at the same festival for its Gose German-Style Sour Ale and Dry Stout. Others to watch among the countless number of city hot spots: Stoup Brewing, Peddler, Urban Family Brewing Company, and don’t miss the urban beer garden at Fremont Brewing. 960 1280

Courtesy of Ghostfish Brewing Co.  

Fort Collins, Colorado

Fort Collins, Colorado

Unlike its famous neighbors Denver, Colorado Springs, and Golden, Fort Collins, Colorado is home to some of the first craft breweries in the state—and some of the newest. Odell Brewing got started in 1989 in a 1915 grain elevator. Its roots are built on British styles. 90 Shilling Ale is the brewery’s top-selling flagship, and they just released Drumroll, a citrus-inspired American pale ale in the spring. Fat Tire put New Belgium Brewing Company on the map, but their Lips of Faith releases and citrusy, hoppy IPAs are getting everyone’s attention now. Don’t miss Funkwerks’ award-winning Belgian-Style Saison, barrel-aged golden Deceit, and Raspberry Provincial. Snowbank Brewing opened in 2014 by a group of self-described nerds and tech enthusiasts, and is a second home to local outdoor groups—staying true to its mission to focus on the passion for the Colorado lifestyle. 960 1280

eal  

Twin Cities, Minnesota

Twin Cities, Minnesota

The Twin Cities are exploding with great new breweries, especially for Saison lovers. Surly Brewing – the mecca – is one of the originals, and started as a smaller brewery in a suburb and expanded into a new location last year. The high-quality beer is worth the hype (try the Cynic Saison), as is the amazing space with outside seating, fire pits, a robust food menu, and outdoor events. Minneapolis’s downtown North Loop has a concentration of breweries within walking distance, including Fulton Beer, whose super drinkable Bourbon barrel-aged rye Saison called ExPat is only released once a year. Northeast Minneapolis is home to another hot spot of beer action. Go to Bauhaus for the really industrial vibe with garage doors that open up to a huge patio. Also check out: Indeed Brewing’s flagship Day Tripper Pale Ale and their Wooden Soul series of wild, sour, and barrel-aged beer; the results of locally grown seed, grain, malting, and brewing at Able Seedhouse + Brewery; and the peanut butter stout at Dangerous Man Brewing Co. Saint Paul staple Summit Brewing is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year with four special limited-release beers, including a medium-bodied, floral, West London Style-Ale. And we hear that the seasonal S’Mores Porter at Flat Earth in downtown St. Paul is unreal. 960 1280

Alexis Mersel  

Omaha, Nebraska

Omaha, Nebraska

A surprise candidate, Omaha is gaining national recognition as a top beer spot. Breweries are sprinkled throughout the city, so for the best taste of the beer scene start with a craft brewery tour of the area. Infusion Brewing has a taproom where hipsters drink its popular Vanilla Bean Blonde Ale and play beer pong. The Benson Brewery is a neighborhood favorite housed in a remodeled turn-of-the-century movie theater, and Farnam House Brewing Co. specializes in combining Old World styles with American hops for their artisan farmhouse ales. Or take a jaunt to Crescent Moon Ale House, Omaha’s original craft beer bar, for top brews from local producers like Zipline, Lucky Bucket Brewing, and Spilker Ales. 960 1280

Courtesy of Infusion Brewing  

Fort Worth, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Fort Worth, and its surrounding area, is having a major craft beer boom. Styles run the gamut from wild and sour ales to unfiltered American cream ales and wheat beers. Award-winning Rahr & Sons Brewing took home accolades last year for its Oktoberfest and The Regulator (a German-style Dopplebock), using family traditions and age-old recipes passed down from ancestors. Panther Island Brewing Co.’s Allergeez, an award-winning unfiltered American wheat beer, gets attention for its name and its Texas honey, chamomile flower and rose hip-infused flavors. Stop by the brewery/taproom at The Collective Brewing Project for snacks, corn hole, yoga, and some wild, sour and funky growlers to go. 960 1280

Courtesy of Panther Island Brewing Co.  

Portland, Maine

Portland, Maine

While we will never dispute that the city that shares its name on the west coast will always rank at the top of any and every beer list ever, Portland, Maine is like the quiet, small (but strong!) little sibling of its Oregon counterpoint. Well-known local Allagash Brewing Company, who won awards for both their Triple and their White in 2015, brews some of the best Belgian-style beers around. Neighborhood brewery Rising Tide Brewing Company offers a variety of styles, anchored by a rye pale ale called Daymark, and a pilot program where new brews are tried out in limited batches. The buzzworthy Bissell Brothers are pushing the limits with their hazy, opaque, ultra-hoppy beers and their bold branding and release strategy. (They sell their coveted Swish Double IPA only in the winter). And newcomers Lone Pine, Fore River, and Austin Street are becoming fast favorites, even with Austin Street only brewing their beer one barrel at a time. 960 1280

Courtesy of Bissell Brothers   

Boston, Massachusetts

Boston, Massachusetts

The Boston beer scene is making a comeback with Trillium, Lord Hobo, and Night Shift leading the charge. Trillium Brewing Company is gaining traction and reach in the area by adding a new 16,000 square foot facility and taproom in Canton to its original home in Fort Point. Draft highlights include wild ales (fermented with native New England mixed microbe culture), hazy west-coast style IPAs, along with well-received stouts and porters, and their beers can be found in more than 14 taps across the city. Night Shift’s Barrel Society membership is so popular that it is already closed for 2016 (sign-ups for 2017 begin in October), but their taproom is open daily with a solid lineup of staple and seasonal brews. And don’t miss out on Boom Sauce from Lord Hobo Brewing Company—the name says it all. 960 1280

Courtesy of Trillium Brewing Company  

Asheville, North Carolina

Asheville, North Carolina

Asheville is a beer lover’s paradise. Decades-old staples are being joined by a suite of newcomers and their award-winning experimental ales and lagers. Wicked Weed specializes in West-coast style hoppy ales, open-fermented Belgian beers, and barrel-aged sours. Their location trifecta includes a brew pub in downtown Asheville, a “Funkatorium” (a sour and funky beer-dedicated taproom) in the South Slope Brewery District, and a 50-barrel production brewery in West Asheville. Altamont Brewing models a pre-prohibition style neighborhood brew pub, which means their beer never sees the light of day before it is poured into your glass. New Belgium Brewing from Fort Collins, Colorado just opened its new outpost in Asheville. In addition to Fat Tire, its thirteen year-round beers, including Citradelic Tangerine IPA, Ranger IPA, Rampant Imperial IPA, Shift Pale Lager, Slow Ride Session IPA, and Blue Paddle Pilsner, are receiving rave reviews. 960 1280

Michael Oppenheim  

Indonesia: Loewy Bar and Bistro
Indonesia: Loewy Bar and Bistro

Indonesia: Loewy Bar and Bistro

Bartender Harli Garnawan serves up "the best, stiffest drinks in town” at this nostalgic, casual bistro. The bar sticks to classic cocktails, including Jakarta's largest selection of fine single malt whiskeys. If you want to see Garnawan's technique at work, try the "king of cocktails," a classic dry martini. 960 1280

Loewy Bar and Bistro  

Puerto Rico: Santaella

Puerto Rico: Santaella

Renowned chef Jose Santaella celebrates the roots of the island's cocina criolla in this 80-seat dining room (complete with a tropical garden) and 16-seat bar. Knowledgeable bartenders, including World Class mixologist Leslie R. Cofresi, blend specialty cocktails, including the Sandia Mojito, which pairs muddled fresh watermelon and mint with Puerto Rican white rum, lime juice and a few secret ingredients. 960 1280

Robert Whitman  

South Africa: Asoka Bar

South Africa: Asoka Bar

Brent Perremore (not pictured) is a resident mixologist at this trendy bar in the heart of Cape Town. Asoka Bar's philosophy is to create a fresh, natural and healthy cocktail experience. 960 1280

Asoka  

Spain: Ohla Boutique Bar

Spain: Ohla Boutique Bar

If you're looking for exquisite cocktails while in Barcelona, look no farther than the Boutique Bar inside Ohla Hotel. Look out over Via Laitana Avenue while sipping on a cocktail mixed by Giuseppe Santamaria. 960 1280

Ohla Hotel  

Dominican Republic: Pat’e Palo

Dominican Republic: Pat’e Palo

This European Brasserie is separated into 2 parts: the bar has a livelier crowd, whereas the lounge is more relaxed. Both, however, serve delicious cocktails created by bartender Pavol Kazimir in a candlelit, romantic atmosphere. 960 1280

Pat’e Palo European Brasserie  

Sweden: Le Rouge

Sweden: Le Rouge

Brasserie Rouge in Stockholm calls to mind the turn-of-the-century Moulin Rouge with its rich colors and heavy textiles. The cocktail list at Le Rouge bar runs several pages long with World Class bartender Rikard Enell at the helm. 960 1280

Åke E:som Lindman  

Denmark: Ruby

Denmark: Ruby

Slip past the unmarked door into this glamorous cocktail joint to order a perfectly-made Manhattan or Burnt Fig (caramelized fig syrup with cognac and cream) from World Class bartender Kasper Riewe. 960 1280

Ruby  

Belgium: Jigger's

Belgium: Jigger's

"The Noble Drug Store" may seem like an odd name for this modern speakeasy in Ghent, but it's the perfect place to go for classic cocktails or more adventurous creations like a tequila-based mustard beer drink from World Class bartender Olivier Jacobs. 960 1280

adamjackson1984, flickr  

China: Bar Constellation

China: Bar Constellation

This small space in Shanghai is big on spirits with over 300 single malts for whiskey drinkers. There's also an extensive cocktail list and a World Class mixologist, Tree Mao, whose signature cocktail is called M.A.N. (Mature, Authentic and Nature). 960 1280

Charlie Xia, flickr  

Vietnam: Sofitel Metropole

Vietnam: Sofitel Metropole

There are several bars at the Hotel Sofitel Hanoi, but if you're going for legendary cocktails, you'll want to make your way to Le Club and order the pho-inspired Joan Baez cocktail created by bartender Tien Tiep Pham. 960 1280

Sofitel Metropole  

Germany: Riva Bar

Germany: Riva Bar

For a hip cocktail bar, its name (after a 1970’s Italian football star Luigi Riva) and interior (which invokes a wind tunnel) are bold choices, but they don't outshine the excellent martinis and champagne cocktails served up by the likes of mixologist Harry Glockler. 960 1280

Engels & Kraemer   

Hofbrauhaus, beer garden, Munich, Germany
Hofbrauhaus, Munich, Germany

Hofbrauhaus, Munich, Germany

Hands down the world's most famous beer garden, the Hofbrauhaus began brewing in the 16th century. Today, more than 400 imbibers can sit outside at its wooden, picnic-style tables and guzzle gigantic mugs of beer served by dirndl-wearing waitresses. 960 1280

BBMC Tobias Ranzinger  

Mount Takao Beer Mount, Tokyo

Mount Takao Beer Mount, Tokyo

If you somehow manage to hike nearly 2,000 feet to the peak of Tokyo's Mount Takao, at the very least, you deserve a beer. With that in mind, one of the world's highest beer gardens opened here (at just over 1,600 feet), and it offers stunning views of Tokyo's skyscrapers and sprawl. Less athletically inclined visitors can still get their drink on at high altitudes, thanks to a cable car. 960 1280

Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau  

Bohemian Hall and Beer Garden, Astoria, NY

Bohemian Hall and Beer Garden, Astoria, NY

Bohemian Hall is proof that good beer gardens can be found in unexpected places. For more than a century, this beloved spot in Queens has helped New Yorkers get sloshed with their friends in a sea of trees and twinkly lights. Live music, table tennis and hearty Czech fare sweeten the deal. 960 1280

Clayton Cotterell/NYC & Company  

Koniglicher Hirschgarten, Munich, Germany

Koniglicher Hirschgarten, Munich, Germany

Hofbrauhaus may be Germany's most popular beer garden, but Hirschgarten is far and away its biggest. Set in the midst of a 100-acre park, it seats up to 8,000 thirsty souls. 960 1280

Koeniglicher Hirschgarten  

Café Vlissinghe, Bruges, Belgium

Café Vlissinghe, Bruges, Belgium

Escape the tourist-choked streets of Bruges in this pleasant beer garden. The city's oldest bar opened in 1515, and patrons can quaff their drinks inside a charming room with dark oak rafters and wooden tables or on the peaceful outdoor terrace, where you can also play a game of pétanque. 960 1280
Letná Beer Garden, Prague

Letná Beer Garden, Prague

Enjoy your brew with a view. Prague's most scenic beer garden is located in Letná Park, overlooking the Old City and the Vltava River. Grab a beer in a plastic cup and wander the park's trails, or relax on the terrace. 960 1280

Richard Nebesky/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images   

Brouwerij 't IJ, Amsterdam

Brouwerij 't IJ, Amsterdam

Patrons of this former bathhouse enjoy its enviable location adjacent to the city's De Gooyer windmill. Tour the brewery or head straight to the bar, where you can order a draft or bottled beer and snack on cheese and sausages. 960 1280

Brouwerij 't IJ  

Luong Son, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Luong Son, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Make like a local in Ho Chi Minh City and visit Luong Son. At this bustling open-air beer garden of sorts, join hundreds of other patrons and pull up a plastic chair, throw back a cold Saigon beer, and order from a menu of grill-it-yourself meats (grills are provided!). 960 1280
Augustiner Bräu Kloster Mülln, Salzburg, Austria

Augustiner Bräu Kloster Mülln, Salzburg, Austria

Mülln keeps as many as 1,500 thirsty revelers at a time happy with its secret beer recipe. First brewed by monks in the 17th century, the beer is still served from wooden barrels into traditional steins. 960 1280

Augustiner Bräu Kloster Mülln  

Chinesischer Turm, Munich, Germany

Chinesischer Turm, Munich, Germany

On a warm summer afternoon, it's all but impossible to resist Chinesischer Turm and its namesake, the pagoda-like Chinese Tower. This massive beer garden seats 7,000 and lies in the heart of Munich's English Garden. Plan to do your drinking on a weekend, when a brass band plays. 960 1280

Hans-Peter Merten/The Image Bank/Getty Images  

Video: 5 Global Food Markets

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Food Adventures

Cite du Vin

Cite du Vin

What better a place for a wine museum than Bordeaux, France? Meaning “City of Wine,” Cite du Vin opened in June 2016 and celebrates the culture of wine around the world. It features 20 themed area and exhibits, simulator boat rides and, of course, expert-led wine tastings! Book a multi-sensory tasting workshop that will awaken all of your senses with 360 degree images, lights sounds and smells. Plan your visit. 960 1280

NICOLAS TUCAT  

BonBon-Land

BonBon-Land

BonBon-Land is not your average theme park. The candy-themed attraction in Denmark opened in 1992 after a candy maker heard his young son describe brown candies to look like “dog farts.”  It eventually sparked his idea to open a candy-themed park with a cheeky sense of humor. At the park, you can ride four roller coasters and two water rides, while observing vomiting statues and other signs of bathroom-related humor throughout the park. 960 1280

  

Hersheypark

Hersheypark

Chocolate lovers, this one’s for you. The park has 70 rides and attractions. Adjacent to Hersheypark is Hershey's Chocolate World, a visitors' center that is open to the public and contains shops, restaurants and a chocolate factory-themed tour ride. Qualifying height ranges for rides have a designated candy label. For example, if you are 42 to 46 inches tall, you fall into the Reese’s category. If you’re 54 to 60 inches, you’re in the Twizzlers group. Kids can see what rides they qualify for simply by seeing their candy category next to the ride. 960 1280

Barry Winiker  

Eataly World

Eataly World

Eataly, the Italian food emporium with marketplaces all over the world, is opening a theme park in Bologna, Italy mid-2017. Eataly World will span 20 acres and showcase every aspect of Italian food, from production to consumption. 960 1280

Bloomberg  

Epcot

Epcot

While Epcot in Orlando, Florida is not solely a food-specific theme park, it boasts plenty of events and culinary offerings to attract and entertain foodies. It hosts the Epcot International Food & Wine Festival each fall, has an impressive lineup of restaurants and features the Living with the Land attraction, where you can learn about the future of food production and even see Mickey-shaped produce. 960 1280

Orlando Sentinel  

Bierwelt

Bierwelt

A brewery-owned theme park in Abensberg, Germany, Bierwelt features a large beer garden, an observation tower, beer gnomes and structures made from beer bottles. The architectural vision of Bierwelt is supposedly based on some of the architect's drawings after a few beer flights too many. 960 1280

w-ings  

Hameau Doboeuf

Hameau Doboeuf

Before Cite du Vin, there was Hameau Doboeuf, France’s first wine theme park. It’s designed for family visits and offers 3D movies, train rides and visits to the wine cellars where you can learn about the process of winemaking while surrounded by 150 stainless-steel vats. Kids ages five and up can take a virtual flight over the hill and valleys of the Beaujolais and Maconnais districts through cinematic simulation. 960 1280

GUY Christian / hemis.fr  

The Inn at Valley Farms, Walpole, New Hampshire
Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico

Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico

This historic farm in the Albuquerque area is known for its lavender fields and products. Stay in a Southwest-style room with a "kiva" fireplace and lavender-infused amenities, and enjoy meals using produce grown on-site on one of several patios and dining rooms. Guests are invited to help out on the farm, from harvesting lavender to learning how to compost, and volunteer days are available on Wednesdays and Saturdays, during which participants learn about various farm duties. 960 1280

  

Flint Hill Farm AG, Coopersburg, Pennsylvania

Flint Hill Farm AG, Coopersburg, Pennsylvania

Learn how to make cheese, milk cows, collect your own eggs for breakfast and other farm skills at this 26-acre dairy farm that dates back to 1850. A certified raw milk dairy, Flint Hill Farm produces both pasteurized and raw milk and pasteurized cheese, butter and yogurt. Guest may stay in the farm house or the farm’s RV. Horse riding lessons are also available, and the resident draft horse team is also a favorite with visitors. 960 1280

  

Mariposa Retreat at Earth and Sea Farm, Summerland Key, Florida

Mariposa Retreat at Earth and Sea Farm, Summerland Key, Florida

Located in the Florida Keys near the Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge, Earth and Sea Farm harvests sea salt and grows bananas, papayas, soap nuts and many indigenous crops. Bees are also kept on property. Guests may pay to stay in the bed and breakfast, or stay in exchange for work through the Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms program. Farm tours are available for groups of three to seven and include a Florida Keys Sea Salt tasting. 960 1280

  

Feather Down Farm, Kinnikinnick Farm, Illinois

Feather Down Farm, Kinnikinnick Farm, Illinois

Glamp in a canvas tent with running water and a nearby bathhouse and learn about farm life as you help gather eggs, feed animals, milk goats, take a hayride and harvest dinner from the acres of fields and orchards on this organic farm located 90 miles northwest of Chicago. Not hungry for a fresh salad? Enjoy a wood-oven pizza you create using farm ingredients, and save room for s’mores afterwards. 960 1280

  

Cold Moon Farm, Jamaica, Vermont

Cold Moon Farm, Jamaica, Vermont

Wake up with the roosters and milk goats, collect eggs, pick vegetables and help with other farm chores at this farm/B&B 15 miles from Manchester, Vermont. Five plush guest rooms in the main house each have a private bath, and share the dining room where farm-to-table meals are served. Take cooking classes, go hiking or enjoy a spa treatment after learning about the daily routine of farm life. 960 1280

  

Ridge to Reef Farm, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

Ridge to Reef Farm, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

With the goal of producing one percent of the U.S. Virgin Islands’ food, the Ridge to Reef Farm invites guests to visit for the day or stay in one of their stilted cabanas and get their hands dirty learning about organic farming. When you’re not helping with the farm, hike the rainforest, visit the ruins of a Dutch sugar mill or explore the shops in nearby Frederiksted. 960 1280

  

North Country Farms, Kauai, Hawaii

North Country Farms, Kauai, Hawaii

Farm in paradise at this Kauai organic farm just east of Kilauea. Stay in a farm-stay cottage surrounded by fruit trees and organic gardens from which you can pick your meals. The three-acre farm includes a pineapple field. Tours are offered during which the farm’s organic and sustainability practices are shared. 960 1280

  

Ewe Bet Farm, Cave Springs, Arkansas

Ewe Bet Farm, Cave Springs, Arkansas

This sheep farm just 15-minutes south of Bentonville and the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art specializes in raising all-natural lamb using humane husbandry practices, and grazed in managed pastures. Guest stay in a large suite in the main house that has its own kitchen, fireplace, and deck overlooking apple and peach trees, and are welcome to help feed the sheep and lambs and learn about the daily routine of the farm. Breakfast is delivered to the room each morning and features homemade muffins, fresh eggs and fruit from the orchards. 960 1280

  

Nettles Farm, Lummi Island, Washington

Nettles Farm, Lummi Island, Washington

Nestled on Lummi Island west of Bellingham, Nettles Farm focuses on raising Sulmthaler, Poulet Bleu and Poulet de Bresse chickens and supply neighboring renowned Willows Inn Restaurant with meat and produce. Guests at Nettles Farm may help with farm activities and take the “Butcher Your Own Chicken” workshop during which they prepare their own dinner. Guests also have first option to book a table at the in-demand Willows Inn Restaurant. 960 1280

  

The Inn at Valley Farms, Walpole, New Hampshire

The Inn at Valley Farms, Walpole, New Hampshire

Stay in a 1774 Colonial home and enjoy a candle-lit farm-to-table, multi-course breakfast on this 105-acre property in Walpole, New Hampshire. Tour the farm and pitch in with chores that include gathering eggs, feeding the beef cows, pigs and goats, learning about sustainable farming, picking herbs and crops, and any other work that needs to be done. After, have an in-room massage, hike the property or explore the agriculturally rich area and the charming town of Walpole. 960 1280

Only the Best :-))  

Abeja Vineyard
Abeja Winery, Walla Walla, Washington

Abeja Winery, Walla Walla, Washington

Located on 35 acres of farmland, Abeja Winery has turned former farm buildings into seven private, well-appointed farm-chic guesthouses. Guests may tour the three vineyards that grow primarily Viognier and Syrah grapes, and learn about Abeja’s pruning and growing techniques. 960 1280

Matthew Lovette  

Youngberg Hill, McMinnville, Oregon

Youngberg Hill, McMinnville, Oregon

The nine-guestroom Youngberg Hill bed and breakfast overlooks 20 acres of vineyards of Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris and Chardonnay that are grown organically and without irrigation, using only rainfall. Guests are welcome to tour the vineyard and ask about Youngberg Hill’s methods, and pitch in to help with the fall harvest. Stylish rooms include a gourmet breakfast, and most have views of the vineyard. 960 1280

  

Comstock Wines, Healdsburg, California

Comstock Wines, Healdsburg, California

Choose from one of four contemporary rooms at Comstock Wines, each featuring a fireplace, private entrance, wrap-around porch, spa bathrooms and a shared fully appointed chef’s kitchen and media room perfect for larger groups. The 17-acre estate winery offers yoga and wine tastings, and the Winery Tour and Taste takes guests out into the vineyards to learn about the history of Comstock and its winemaking philosophy and techniques, as well as its sustainable farming practices. 960 1280

Natasha McGuire  

Gervasi Vineyard, Canton, Ohio

Gervasi Vineyard, Canton, Ohio

This 55-acre Tuscan-inspired winery and vineyard has 24 suites with fireplaces and a four-bedroom farmhouse with a complete kitchen for larger parties. Take a culinary or wine class through the on-site Cucina Culinary and Wine Education Center, and learn the finer points of growing wine grapes on a winery tour. Enjoy dinner at The Bistro, Piazza Outdoor Patio or Crush House Wine Bar and Eatery, and further relax with an in-room massage treatment. 960 1280

  

Biltmore Winery, Asheville, North Carolina

Biltmore Winery, Asheville, North Carolina

Biltmore Winery is part of the Vanderbilt-built chateau that boasts 150 acres of vineyards and produces 150,000 cases of wine yearly. Guest may choose from the Village Hotel or the luxury Inn or Cottage, with rates starting at $189. Several wine-related classes and tours are offered, ranging from wine tastings to the Winery Production Tour, where enthusiasts go behind the scenes of the winery to learn the science and logistics of the estate’s wine label production. The Vine to Wine Tour visits the vineyards to discuss grape production. The West Range Tour takes guests via motor coach to the Biltmore’s west side to learn about its forestry, farming and sustainability programs. 960 1280

  

Madison Vineyard Estate Winery, Madison, Indiana

Madison Vineyard Estate Winery, Madison, Indiana

Opened in 2005, with the vineyard dating to 1995, Madison Vineyard Estate Winery has four guestrooms in the winery with private baths that overlook the vineyard, plus two cottages for families and larger groups. Eleven varieties of grapes are grown on-site, and guests may request a tour of the vineyard and winery operation. Special event packages are offered throughout the year. 960 1280

  

Estrella del Norte, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Estrella del Norte, Santa Fe, New Mexico

At Estrella del Norte, choose to stay in one of four Southwest-style casitas just north of Santa Fe surrounded by one of three vineyards. Lend a hand in the vineyard and take a wine class to learn about the history of winemaking in New Mexico, which arrived with the Spanish in the 1500s. Special events are planned year-round, including the fall harvest and Harvest Dinner. Make sure to take home a bottle of the popular Holy Molly, a red wine infused with red chile and chocolate. 960 1280

  

Messina Hof Winery & Resort, Bryan, Texas

Messina Hof Winery & Resort, Bryan, Texas

One of the state's oldest wineries, Messina Hof’s first vineyard was planted in 1977. Today, the winery produces 130,000 gallons annually at its three locations in Bryan, Fredericksburg and Grapevine. In Bryan, stay at the Villa B&B that has 11 suites with private patios and lakeside views and include homemade breakfasts and mimosas. In Fredericksberg, the Manor House B&B has four separate cottages with private entrances and kitchenettes. Learn about the history of winemaking in this region settled by German pioneers, help out with the harvest and tour the vineyards and historic cellars, where you can sample vintages straight from the casks. 960 1280

  

Paradise Hills Resort & Spa, Blairsville, Georgia

Paradise Hills Resort & Spa, Blairsville, Georgia

Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Reisling, Chardonnel, Traminette and Sangiovese are grown on Paradise Hills Resort & Spa’s 35 acres of vineyard that surround cabins ranging from one to four bedrooms. Tour the vineyard and winery, and help stomp grapes during the late summer harvest. After, relax with a massage treatment at the on-site European-style spa. 960 1280

  

Dunning Vineyards Estate Wines, Paso Robles, California

Dunning Vineyards Estate Wines, Paso Robles, California

Stylish one-bedroom suites overlook 40 acres of vineyards and coastal mountain property at Dunning Vineyards Estate Wines, and have king beds, private patio terraces, marble baths and spa tubs and full kitchenettes. Take an agricultural tour that teaches proper pruning, canopy management, irrigation and harvesting of grapes before moving on to fermentation techniques, blending wines and other winemaking skills, followed by wine tastings. 960 1280

  

Cazuela: La Vega Central, Santiago, Chile

Cazuela: La Vega Central, Santiago, Chile

Each day thousands of people pass through the stalls of La Vega Central, the 60,000 square foot market near the north shore of the Mapocho River in Santiago, Chile. Many locals stop at the market for lunch, where a bowl of cazuela, a rustic chicken stew, is a popular choice. 960 1280

LarisaBlinova  

Sushi: Tsukiji Fish Market, Tokyo, Japan

Sushi: Tsukiji Fish Market, Tokyo, Japan

You probably won’t find fresher sushi anywhere in the world than you will at Tokyo’s Tsukiji Fish Market. Sushi lovers line up as early at 5:30 in the morning to score a seat in the market’s most famous restaurants, Sushi Dai and Daiwa-sushi. 960 1280

Tomohiro Ohsumi  

Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes: Eastern Market, Washington, D.C.

Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes: Eastern Market, Washington, D.C.

On weekends only, the lunch counter in Washington, D.C.’s historic Eastern Market serves blueberry buckwheat pancakes. Arrive early as the line often extends right out the door of the market. 960 1280

Tom Williams  

Kebobs: Grand Bazaar, Istanbul, Turkey

Kebobs: Grand Bazaar, Istanbul, Turkey

It’s easy to work up an appetite at Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar, one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world. Several stalls within the Bazaar itself, as well as on its outskirts, serve up traditional Turkish kebobs. 960 1280

Godong  

Sausage on a Stick: Borough Market, London, England

Sausage on a Stick: Borough Market, London, England

Hungry shoppers in central London’s Borough Market, which is said to have been in operation for more than 1000 years, swear by the “sausage on a stick” from the Mountain’s Boston Sausages stall.  960 1280

  

Socca: Cours Salera, Nice, France

Socca: Cours Salera, Nice, France

Socca, thin chickpea griddle cakes cooked over an open flame, are not to be missed when visiting Nice’s classic open-air market, the Cours Salera. Teresa’s is the most famous storefront. 960 1280

  

Peameal Bacon Sandwich: St. Lawrence Market, Toronto, Canada

Peameal Bacon Sandwich: St. Lawrence Market, Toronto, Canada

Toronto’s world famous peameal bacon on a bun is the signature dish at St. Lawrence Market. Thick slabs of the bacon, which has been rolled in yellow cornmeal, are the centerpiece of this beloved sandwich, available at Carousel Bakery. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of Kevin Wong:  http://www.kxwong.yelp.com  

Tapas: Mercado de San Miguel, Madrid, Spain

Tapas: Mercado de San Miguel, Madrid, Spain

Renovated and reopened in 2009, Madrid’s Mercado San Miguel, not far from the Plaza Mayor, is less a traditional food market than it is a tapas market. Take a sampling of tapas from different stalls (we’re partial to the olives stuffed with tuna and pepper) to the tables and enjoy with a glass of sangria. 960 1280

GERARD JULIEN  

Prawns and Oysters: Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, Australia

Prawns and Oysters: Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, Australia

While some vendors serve already-prepared seafood platters, others at the world’s third-largest fish market will cook your shellfish on the spot. Enjoy the views of the working harbor while you eat your meal. 960 1280

Andrew Holt  

Tea: Khan el Khalili, Cairo, Egypt

Tea: Khan el Khalili, Cairo, Egypt

This souk is among the biggest and busiest in Cairo. For weary shoppers, nothing beats a strong cup of tea from Fisihawi’s Cafe. 960 1280

In Pictures  

Quesadillas: Bazaar del Sabado, Mexico City, Mexico

Quesadillas: Bazaar del Sabado, Mexico City, Mexico

This busy Saturday market in Mexico City is more of a craft market than a food market, but many people visit just to sample the incomparable quesadillas at the market’s cafe, especially ones with zucchini flowers or huitlacoche (a black corn fungus). 960 1280

Kelly/Mooney Photography  

Cheers Around the World

close up of turkish coffee on table in traditional cup
Italy: Espresso

Italy: Espresso

You’ll surely get an eye roll or two if you order a to-go cup at an Italian cafe, for espresso is the Italians’ version of to-go coffee. This strong brew served in tiny cups is commonly sipped while standing at cafes. And don’t order a cappuccino late in the day in Italy, either — the only appropriate time to enjoy that particular drink is in the morning.  960 1280

Zero Creatives / Cultura / Getty Images  

Turkey: Türk Kahvesi

Turkey: Türk Kahvesi

A famous Turkish proverb says that coffee should be "as black as hell, as strong as death and as sweet as love." This thick brew is usually served after meals from a long-handled copper pot called a cezve, accompanied by chewy Turkish candy. 960 1280

Nico Kaiser via Flickr Creative Commons 2.0  

Denmark: Kaffee

Denmark: Kaffee

Perhaps because of the cold, dark Scandinavian winters, coffee consumption in Denmark has always been some of the highest in the world. Coffee is such a vital part of the Danish culture that packed cafes can be found on nearly every corner, especially in cities such as Copenhagen.  960 1280

Rhiannon Taylor  

France: Café au Lait

France: Café au Lait

The French begin the day with their café au lait –coffee with hot milk, served in a mug wide enough to allow the dunking of baguettes or croissants.  960 1280

Jessica Spangler via Flickr Creative Commons 2.0  

Cuba: Café Cubano

Cuba: Café Cubano

Cubans like their coffee strong, whether it's first thing in the morning, after meals or at any chance they get throughout the day. An important part of the social fabric, the Cuban’s strong brew is served in shots and best enjoyed while socializing.  960 1280

By Ivan2010 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons  

Saudi Arabia: Kahwa

Saudi Arabia: Kahwa

In Saudi Arabia and other Arab cultures, coffee ceremonies follow many rules of etiquette, including always serving the elders first. It is also a common custom to serve this cardamom-spiced drink with dried dates to counter the coffee’s bitterness. 960 1280

Nalf alOwais / Moment / Getty Images  

Netherlands: Kaffe

Netherlands: Kaffe

Not to be confused with Amsterdam’s infamous coffee shops, coffee-serving cafes are a celebrated part of the Netherlands' culture. Also known as bakkie troost, the Dutch kaffe is enjoyed any time of day, usually comes black, and is served alongside a cookie.  960 1280

Goncalo Valverde, flickr  

Ireland: Irish Coffee

Ireland: Irish Coffee

Coffee meets cocktail with this after-dinner drink. Irish coffee includes hot coffee, Irish whiskey, sugar and the crowd-pleasing whipped-cream topper. Irish coffee was actually created in Ireland in the 1940s to warm up American tourists on a cold winter’s night, and it remains as popular as ever today.  960 1280

bbq / Moment / Getty Images  

Mexico: Café de Olla

Mexico: Café de Olla

If you like cinnamon in your coffee, this is your drink. Spiced café de olla is brewed with cinnamon sticks in earthenware pots, which Mexicans swear brings out the coffee taste.  960 1280

Leon Rafael / iStock / Getty Images Plus  

Ethiopia: Buna

Ethiopia: Buna

In Ethiopia, the birthplace of coffee, traditional coffee ceremonies are a distinguished part of the culture, with the brewing and serving process lasting up to two hours. Historically, buna, as coffee is called here, was served with salt or butter instead of sugar.  960 1280

Tim E. White / Photolibrary / Getty Images  

Austria: Mélange

Austria: Mélange

Served in Viennese cafes, Austria’s traditional drink, mélange, is very similar to a cappuccino. It contains espresso and steamed milk and is topped with froth or, sometimes, whipped cream (which is what makes it different from a traditional cappuccino). 960 1280

Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images  

Greece: Frappé

Greece: Frappé

The Greek frappé is a frothy iced drink made with Nescafé instant coffee, cold water, sugar and evaporated milk. It's best enjoyed in an outdoor cafe.  960 1280

Tilemahos Efthimiadis via Flickr Creative Commons BY-SA 2.0  

San Diego Winery Train
San Diego Winery Train, California

San Diego Winery Train, California

Hop aboard the Coaster commuter train with San Diego Beer, Wine & Spirits Tours for the Winery Train Tour, which makes several stops at wineries and wine bars along Southern California’s coast. Each tour includes tastings of 15 wines as well as a fine dining-wine pairing light luncheon. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of San Diego Beer; Wine & Spirits Tours  

The Presidential, Portugal

The Presidential, Portugal

Twice a year, for fifteen days each time, The Presidential Train, once known as the Portuguese Royal Train, comes out of retirement from the National Railway Museum in Lisbon to embark on a gourmet travel experience through Portugal. The nine-hour round-trip journey through Portugal’s Douro Valley wine region includes a four-course meal prepared by a Michelin starred chef, as well as wine pairings, unlimited spirits and a stop at a vineyard for special events and a port tasting. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of The Presidential Train  

Tren Sabores Del Valle, Chile

Tren Sabores Del Valle, Chile

The Sabores del Valle train travels from Santiago, Chile to San Fernando, where visitors board a bus for Santa Cruz to visit one vineyard and the museum. Tastings of three wines are included on the two-hour train journey, as is live music. 960 1280

MARTIN BERNETTI  

Great Southern Rail’s Indian Pacific, Australia

Great Southern Rail’s Indian Pacific, Australia

The four-day, three-night transcontinental journey from Sydney to Perth on Great Southern Rail’s Indian Pacific passes through Australia’s major wine regions, including a stop for a wine-tasting tour in the Barossa in South Australia. On the train itself travelers enjoy gourmet wine menus that reflect each of these regions. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of Great Southern Rail  

Franschhoek Wine Tram, South Africa

Franschhoek Wine Tram, South Africa

This hop-on, hop-off tour by open-air tram and bus trolley travels through the Franschhoek Valley wine region in South Africa. The tour stops at eight vineyards allowing passengers to visit as many or as few as they like at their leisure. Basic tour packages include complimentary tastings at two vineyards. Visitors are encouraged to make their own lunch reservations at the vineyard of their choice. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of Franschhoek Wine Tram  

Venice Simplon-Orient-Express, Italy

Venice Simplon-Orient-Express, Italy

The legendary Orient Express travels overnight from London to Venice and includes brunch with bellinis, a four-course dinner and half a bottle of wine per guest, breakfast the following morning, a three-course lunch with wine, and afternoon tea, all in vintage luxury Pullman rail cars. Upon arrival in Venice, passengers may add on a boat tour through Venice’s secret lagoon wineries or the Collio Wine Tour, moving from tasting to tasting in a motorcycle’s sidecar. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of Belmond  

Korean Wine and Cinema Train, Korea

Korean Wine and Cinema Train, Korea

This one-of-a-kind train ride runs along the Seoul to Chung-buk Yeongdong trainline, offering unlimited wine tasting, live performance and movies. Upon arrival at Yeongdong Station, travelers take a bus to the Wine Korea garden where they can enjoy a buffet luncheon, visit the traditional music museum, and enjoy a wine foot bath. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of Package Korea  

Napa Valley Wine Train, California

Napa Valley Wine Train, California

Billed as a restaurant on rails, the Napa Valley Wine Train runs a collection of restored early 20th-century Pullman cars on 25 miles of tracks across northern California’s Napa Valley. Travelers may select from an array of themed lunches and dinners or opt instead for a winery tour, which includes transfers to local vineyards. 960 1280

Photo courtesy of Napa Valley Wine Train  

Mallorca Gourmet Train Tour, Mallorca, Spain

Mallorca Gourmet Train Tour, Mallorca, Spain

On the Mallorca Gourmet Train tour, visitors travel via tram to two vineyards where they may sample eight local wines as well Jabugo ham, regional cured cheeses, Mallorca sobrasada sausage, and coca de trampo, a traditional flatbread.   960 1280

Photo courtesy of Mallorca Wine Tours  

More Favorites

More Favorites

Looking for a gourmet rail adventure closer to home? You can find wine train experiences in Colorado, Texas, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Many of these excursions are offered only seasonally or on specific dates, so make sure to check with the tour operator before making any travel plans. 960 1280

Robert George  

Otto's Shrunken Head Tiki Bar in New York City
Frankie's Tiki Bar, Las Vegas

Frankie's Tiki Bar, Las Vegas

Let's be honest, Vegas is known for its excess and Frankie's Tiki Bar embodies that with a Polynesian twist. Pull up a stool, order the Kapu I'A and don't forget to purchase a commemorative glass to take home. Their selection is incredible.

 
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Hale Pele, Portland

Hale Pele, Portland

Hale Pele is located in the cocktail mecca of Portland. With the volcano theme running throughout the bar, order yourself a Lava Flow. This visual masterpiece is a strawberry variation on the Pina Colada.

 

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Honi Honi, Hong Kong

Honi Honi, Hong Kong

Lucky enough to find yourself in Hong Kong? Head over to Honi Honi for the authentic tiki experience. Try the Dragon Fire cocktail which is prepared "blazer-style." This means the spirits are warmed and set a flame as the bartender "rolls" (pours) them between two cocktail shakers.

 

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Don the Beachcomber, Huntington Beach

Don the Beachcomber, Huntington Beach

Huntington Beach (outside of Los Angeles) is home to one of the original tiki bars, Don the Beachcomber. This spot is a pilgrimage for any hardcore tiki fan and you simply must order a Zombie. 960 1280

  

Kokomo, Helsinki

Kokomo, Helsinki

If Anthony Bourdain likes this place, so should you. He visited on No Reservations and rightfully so. It's the first tiki bar in Finland and best. Stick with the classics or venture out to one of their original works.

 

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Beach Bum Barry's Latitude 29, New Orleans

Beach Bum Barry's Latitude 29, New Orleans

It's hard to select only one place to visit when you go to New Orleans. But the arguable cocktail capital of the U.S. has this brilliant bar. "Choosing a favorite at Latitude 29 is not an easy task," says Ann Tuennerman, co-founder of Tales of the Cocktail. "You really can’t go wrong up and down the menu. But if you pushed me to pick just one I’d say the Pontchartrain Pearl Diver."

 

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Jochen Hirschfeld  

Mahiki, London

Mahiki, London

"Mahiki is a tropical escape from reality in Mayfair London. The closest you can get to holiday in Hawaii without a plane ticket," says Georgi Radev of the Spirit of Tiki Team in the United Kingdom. Check out their signature drink: the Honolulu Honey featuring Honey Cream.

 

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Maikai, Ft. Lauderdale

Maikai, Ft. Lauderdale

With epic Hawaiian stage shows, you are in for a treat at this Florida hot spot. The owners recommend the Black Magic cocktail featuring coffee and rum flavors.

 

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Otto's Shrunken Head, New York City

Otto's Shrunken Head, New York City

NYC has hundreds of bars but Otto's Shrunken Head is the…head…of the class. Kelly and Paul from the Velveteen Lounge Kitsch-en Show know their tiki and recommend the name sake cocktail, Otto's Shrunken Head. "Great downtown vibe, friendly folks, fabulous decor and delicious (strong) drinks."

 

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Porco's, Cleveland

Porco's, Cleveland

Cleveland has extraordinary bars that are under the radar on the national scene. "One of my favorite drinks ever is the Jungle Bird," says Shane McGrath, president of the Greater Detroit U.S. Bartender's Guild. You'll adore the beautifully decorated bar and patio at this midwest tiki treasure.

 

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John C Jones  

Shameful Tiki, Toronto and Vancouver

Shameful Tiki, Toronto and Vancouver

Spanning the Canadian coasts, with Vancouver and Toronto locations, is Shameful Tiki. If you dare, order the Mystery Bowl. The drink requires two or more imbibers and comes with a fair warning and lots of hoopla.

 

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Smuggler's Cove, San Francisco

Smuggler's Cove, San Francisco

One of the modern kings of tiki is Smuggler's Cove in San Francisco. Camper English, founder of Alcademics.com, recommends the Jet Pilot. With a gorgeous bar like this, you can't go wrong with your selection. Grab their new book on the way out and bring some tiki home with you.

 

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Three Dots and A Dash, Chicago

Three Dots and A Dash, Chicago

Every night this bar is organized chaos with lines wrapped around the building and energy-pumping music. It's not your typical tiki bar. Yet, the drinks speak for themselves. Order a Chief Lapu Lapu, for you and your friends, off their delightfully retro menu.

 

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Anjali M. PInto  

Trader Sam's Grog Grotto, Disneyland and Walt Disney World

Trader Sam's Grog Grotto, Disneyland and Walt Disney World

Disney knows how to bring fun and entertainment to any situation and tiki is no exception. With locations in both Disneyland and Walt Disney World, check out the later for an even more exciting experience. Certain drinks on the menu trigger events to happen in the bar. This could be rain, eruptions or singing by the staff. Order the Nautilus, if you don't believe me. 960 1280

David Roark  

Trader Vic's, Emeryville, California

Trader Vic's, Emeryville, California

Just outside of San Francisco lies the other champion of the classic cocktail era: Trader Vic's. The worldwide empire that invented many famous drinks and launched 19 locations started here. The one drink you must order is the iconic Mai Tai. 960 1280

Eric Risberg  

Jungle Boy, Melbourne

Jungle Boy, Melbourne

A speakeasy-style tiki bar is the clever combo you find in Melbourne with Jungle Boy. You have to enter through the secret enterance in a sub shop and the bar only seats 40 so be patience if you can't get in this popular spot. Try the Zombie with an "American" style sub.

 
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Raki, Turkey
Amaro, Italy

Amaro, Italy

The savvy traveler would be remise to not try a local Amaro while in Italy. The word translates to bitter and is often drank after a pleasing dinner. One of the popular choices is Amaro Nonino. Try it neat or over a few ice cubes while watching the sunset. 960 1280

Luca Tassotto  

Pisco, Peru

Pisco, Peru

While Chili also claims to be the origin of this spirit, most experts lean toward the Peruvian story. Pisco is a grape-based spirit that is somewhere between brandy and grappa when it comes to ingredients and preparation. The Pisco Sour is the way to go and will quench any palate. 960 1280

Matthew Noel FindingFlavors.com  

Cachaça, Brazil

Cachaça, Brazil

During the 2016 games in Rio, Cachaça was seen around the world, drank in cocktails and sipped pool side. Next time you are in the largest South American country, try a Caipirinha which is lime, sugar and Cachaça. 960 1280

  

Fernet, Argentina

Fernet, Argentina

All bartenders know the deliciously bitter flavor of Fernet, which finds is origins in Argentina. A neat shot of the drink is known as the bartenders handshake. But if that is too much for you, try it mixed with cola. This cocktail is very popular in Buenos Aires and the rest of the country. 960 1280

  

Genever, The Netherlands

Genever, The Netherlands

Call it jenever, genever, Dutch gin or genievre, all are correct. This spirit is the granddaddy to gin and is a much more lucious and slightly sweet version. Next time you find yourself in The Netherlands ask for a Martinez served with Genever and not gin (the classic way). 960 1280

  

Shochu, Japan

Shochu, Japan

Trips to Japan are often filled with sake and beer but expand your horizons and try some Shochu. The spirit is very light and lower in alcohol so you can sip it and enjoy the nuanced flavors. The most popular is Iichiko and is barley based (like scotch). 960 1280

  

Pastis, France

Pastis, France

We've all heard about Absinthe by why not experience Pastis the next time you travel to France. This liqueur is a sweetened spirit that is related to the green fairy. Try it the classic way on ice and water or some of the fantastic cocktails like the one above called the Bastille Day Boisson. 960 1280

  

Pimm's, England

Pimm's, England

Fans of FX's Archer know that Pimm's Cups are amazing. Ever notice that the bottle says Pimm's #1? There are actually five other varieties that rarely make it to the U.S. and most aren't even made anymore. You can still find #3 and #6 in England so go check out an old bar and taste some history. 960 1280

  

Rhum, Martinique

Rhum, Martinique

Rum is great but Rhum is incredible. Rum is made with molasses while Rhum is made with fresh pressed sugar cane. It's a much more artisan product and can be found in many French colony islands especially Martinique. 960 1280

  

Soju, South Korea

Soju, South Korea

Similar to its little brother in Japan, Soju is the national drink of South Korea. Jinro is the leader and is even making its way to the U.S. (slowly). Try this light spirit neat and cold like vodka or mixed in a refreshing cocktail. 960 1280

  

Sotol, Mexico

Sotol, Mexico

Tequila is flowing in the U.S. and even Mezcal but what about other Agave-based spirits? If you can find Sotol on a trip to Mexico, check it out. This small batch spirit is subtle and tasty. 960 1280

Allison Webber  

Unicum, Hungary

Unicum, Hungary

The national drink of Hungry is Unicum. In the U.S. we can sometimes see his brother, Zwack, but they are slightly different. Drink this herbal liqueur neat or in a cocktail but show the locals you can hang with their official drink. 960 1280

  

Raki, Turkey

Raki, Turkey

Turkey is a country of many incredible spices and their national drink, Raki, is no exception. This anise based spirit (similar to Pastis) is often consumed with some water to give it a fantastic opalescent sheen. 960 1280

  

Feni, India

Feni, India

A stop in India might get you a taste of Feni even though it is just starting to become available in the U.S. This is a traditional liquor made from the cashew apples or the fruit that sits above the nut on the tree. Try this spirit neat, over ice or with a local lemon and lime soda called Limca. 960 1280

  

Mai Tai
Blue Hawaiian

Blue Hawaiian

The Blue Hawaiian was invented by Harry Yee, who was the head bartender of the Hilton Hawaiian Village, in the 1950s. The drink is still served there today and Harry, 96, still walks around Honolulu. The drink was inspired by the beautiful color of the Pacific Ocean.

 

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Hurricane

Hurricane

A drink that is ubiquitous to the streets of New Orleans is the Hurricane. This passion fruit and rum concoction was first made at Pat O'Brien's. Just like when this bar was a speakeasy in the 1940s, you can order a Hurricane and take it to go. 960 1280

  

Mai Tai

Mai Tai

The godfather of all tiki drinks is the Mai Tai. Named after the Tahitian word for good, this cocktail was invented by Victor J. Bergeron of Trader Vic's fame in 1944. Victor's family is still at the helm of the brand and now Trader Vic's has locations worldwide where you can order the drink. 960 1280

  

Pina Colada

Pina Colada

The Pina Colada takes rum, coconut milk and pineapple juice then blends it with ice to make the beverage created in 1978. Ramon Portas Mingot claims to be the creator of this drink and you can still find it served today at the spot he worked, the Barrachina Restaurant, in the Caribe Hilton in Puerto Rico.

 

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Painkiller

Painkiller

One of the few major trademarked drinks of the cocktail world is the Painkiller. Created in the 1970s at the Soggy Dollar Bar, the drink is still on the menu and features Pusser's Rum, which owns the trademark. 960 1280

  

Jungle Bird

Jungle Bird

The Jungle Bird bucks the trend of many tiki drinks by adding a bitter component, Campari. It was created in the 1970s at the Kuala Lampur Hilton and you can still order it at their Chambers Bar. 960 1280

EuniceEunny  

Rum Runner

Rum Runner

A cocktail made out of necessity, Tiki John of the Holiday Isle Tiki Bar, had an excess of rum to move. He created the Rum Runner in the 1950s and you can still order this drink at the newly remodeled bar today.

 

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Navy Grog

Navy Grog

Grog refered to a variety of drinks in the 1700s. Many bartenders have made variations over the years and Latitude 29 has a great one. Rumor has it, this cocktail was one of Frank Sinatra's favorites. 960 1280

  

Singapore Sling

Singapore Sling

This drink dates back to the early 1900s and was created by Ngiam Tong Boon of the Long Bar at Raffles Hotel in Singapore. Still served today, this drink features gin and a signature red color from the addtion of cherry liqueur and grenadine.

 
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Rum Swizzle

Rum Swizzle

Heralded as Bermuda's National Drink, the Rum Swizzle has claims in many bars, such as the Saint Kitts Shipwreck bar. What makes the drink official is the swizzling by a real swizzle stick from the actual Swizzle Stick Tree (Quararibea turbinata).

 

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Zombie

Zombie

The Zombie is my personal favorite beach drink and is from the mind of Donn Beach who founded Don the Beachcomber restaurant. This drink has a list of ingredients but, like most tiki cocktails, features rum. While first mixed in the 1930s, you can find them served at Don the Beachcomber any day of the week.

 

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Royal Navy Fog Cutter

Royal Navy Fog Cutter

Created by Tony Ramos of Don the Beachcomber tiki bar, this cocktail contains both rum and gin for a potent combo. This one goes back to the height of tiki in the 1950s and could be seen at many bars. Don't be fooled, Tony did not invent the Ramo's Gin Fizz as that drink goes back to the 1800s. 960 1280

  

'Beer mug'
United States

United States

These days, the U.S. is most known for its huge craft beer movement, but light, fizzy and cold still remains the most common and most served beer. Top lagers include Yuengling, America’s oldest brewery. 960 1280

  

Ireland

Ireland

You can't think about beer in Ireland without picturing a dark glass of Guinness. The stout is actually not black but a very dark ruby red. And it's said a proper glass must be poured at a 45 degree angle for a perfectly creamy head. 960 1280

  

Morocco

Morocco

Disney's Epcot park visitors will recognize the pale lager, Casablanca, served at the country's pavillion. Other popular beers include the pilsner Spéciale Flag. 960 1280

  

South Africa

South Africa

There's a growing craft scene in South Africa but lagers, like Castle and Carling, still remain the most popular. The original beer here, Umqombothi, is made from malted corn and sorghum. 960 1280

  

Norway

Norway

The most popular beer in Norway year round is a pilsner that originally came from central Europe, but around Christmas time, Norwegians make Juleøl, a dark, malted beer. If you go to Norway during the holidays, know that the varieties of Juleøl at bars are much stronger than what you find in the supermarkets. 960 1280

  

Peru

Peru

Pisco may be Peru's national drink, but cerveza is king in terms of sales and consumption. Popular brews include Cristal and Cusqueña. 960 1280

  

Japan

Japan

Pilsner style lagers, like Saporro, are most common in Japan. But Happoshu, a beer-like, slightly malted drink, is growing in sales. 960 1280

  

Mexico

Mexico

The lightest beer in our roundup, cerveza in Mexico is extremely pale with little hops at all. And the famous lime wedge with Corona? It's speculated that actually started in America in the 1980s. Most Mexicans don't drink it with lime. 960 1280

  

Jamaica

Jamaica

Jamaica's internationally popular lager, Red Stripe, is very light and crisp, making it one of the best beers for the beach. 960 1280

  

France

France

France is wine country. But there are beers here, though most are mass-produced pilsner lagers. One traditional style you should put on your beer bucket list is the top-fermented, golden Bière de Garde. 960 1280

  

England

England

American travelers are sometimes shocked at how warm and flat the beer is in England. But that's intentional. The country is known for real ale, which finishes in pub cellars instead of at a brewery and only contains natural carbonation. Similar to red wine, real ale tastes better, and reveals its full flavor, if the glass isn't cold and sweaty. 960 1280

  

Italy

Italy

Another country in Europe's wine belt, Italy isn't known for beer. But lagers, like Peroni, are popular and are commonly paired with pizza. 960 1280

  

Germany

Germany

There are so many beer styles and iconic brews in Germany but the most popular style remains the Bavarian Pilsner or "Pils," a bright, blond brew with strong hops. While you might want to call the glass a beer stein, the iconic glass with handle is actually called a beer mug. The word "stein" means stone in German and is not used to describe a beverage container. 960 1280

  

Belgium

Belgium

Belgium is beer country, with more than 160 breweries. While there are so many iconic brews here, a distinctly different beer you have to try is the fruity Lambic, one of the country's oldest beer styles. Try popular varieties like Peche (peach) or Kriek (cherry). 960 1280

  

Czech Republic

Czech Republic

With a reputation for having the highest beer consumption per capita in the world, the Czech Republic is also known for having some of the best beer in the world. The pilsners here are golden and famously foamy. 960 1280

  

Canada

Canada

The most common brews in Canada are similar to those in the States: pale and golden lagers with some hoppy bitterness. 960 1280

  

China

China

Pale lagers are popular in China and most contain rice or sorghum in addition to rye or barley. While most of the world uses hops as a bittering agent, some beers here use melon. 960 1280

  

Travel Know-How

Even experienced globetrotters are sometimes stumped as to whether or not they can bring home olives from Greece or chutney from India, so how is the average traveler supposed to know? Therefore, consider this guide a handy resource for your travels abroad. As a general rule of thumb, foodstuffs sold at airports and stores catering to tourists are more likely to get through Customs than that star fruit you bought at a street market in Thailand.

This information is current as of July 2016. However, since guidelines are always changing based on the shifting nature of food-related diseases and pests, always check U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Don’t Pack a Pest before a trip. Also bear in mind that despite general guidelines, there are a multitude of exceptions, so Customs’ agents ultimately have the final say. Just remember, while Customs doesn’t always check your loot, if they catch you with undeclared food you could be slapped with a (maximum) $10,000 fine.
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Terry J Alcorn  

Canned and Packaged Goods

Canned and Packaged Goods

Many items in this category are on the approved list, including honey and olive and vegetable oils, as long as they’re in vacuum-packed jars. If you’re flying, jarred liquids or soft textures, including peanut butter, must meet the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) rule of 3.4 ounces (100 ml) or less, otherwise you’ll have to check your bag or part with your souvenir. 960 1280

Wolfgang Kaehler  

Dairy

Dairy

This category is tricky. Milk is generally a no-no, unless it’s for infants. Solid cheese is fine as long as it doesn’t contain meat (such as bacon cheddar cheese). Soft cheeses such as Brie and mozzarella are allowed, but liquid cheeses, including cottage and ricotta, aren’t allowed if they came from countries with foot-and-mouth disease. This currently includes parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

Add eggs, and products made from raw eggs, to the list of food that’s not permitted, although travelers can bring cooked eggs from Mexico. Yogurt, butter and sour cream are allowed (and hopefully don’t spoil along the way).
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jeangill  

Chocolate, Candy and Baked Goods

Chocolate, Candy and Baked Goods

Luckily, chocolate (including liquid-filled), candy and baked goods are generally allowed. Exceptions include Kinder Surprise Eggs, since the toy inside doesn’t pass FDA safety regulations for children’s toys. Mooncakes (a popular baked good in China) aren’t allowed if they’re stuffed with eggs or meat. However, Mooncakes made in Canada are allowed. 960 1280

tolgart  

Nuts

Nuts

Nuts pass muster as long as they’re boiled, cooked, ground, oven dried, pureed, roasted or steamed. Raw nuts may get the green light providing the shell is removed, such as almonds, cashews and macadamia nuts. 960 1280

Nadezhda Kulagina  

Spices and Condiments

Spices and Condiments

Dried spices are a safe bet, but not if they’re from the citrus family (lemon, lime, orange). Common condiments (ketchup, mustard) are allowed, as are marmite and vegemite. 960 1280

DEA / ARCHIVIO J. LANGE  

Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and Vegetables

This category depends on what it is and where it’s from. However, since it’s a long list of what’s not allowed, it’s best to err on the side of caution and leave those lingonberries behind in Sweden. If you have your heart set on a particular item, you can also check the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) database, which lets you search by country or item to find what is and isn’t allowed.

Otherwise, the approved items on the short list include coconuts (as long as the husk is removed), peeled garlic cloves and ginger with clean roots. Dried fruit is also on the short list, from apricots and figs to gooseberries and tomatillos.
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Veronica Bogaerts  

Beverages

Beverages

Since there’s a wealth of information on alcohol alone, view 10 Tips for Bringing Alcohol into the U.S. Non-alcoholic beverages have to meet TSA guidelines if you’re flying. Powdered drinks would be the exception, but they would have to be in the original, sealed container that lists ingredients in English—and even then it’s up to the Customs’ agent. Commercially canned juices should pass inspection. Packaged teas are a common souvenir, but forget about bringing home any with coca, barberry or loose citrus leaves. Roasted and unroasted coffees are okay, but not if they contain pulp. 960 1280

photoL  

Grains, Pasta and Bread

Grains, Pasta and Bread

All varieties of rice are allowed as long as the hull is removed. The exception is rice from countries that contain the Khapra beetle (including India, Turkey, Israel and a host of others). Flour and products made from it, from wheat to cornmeal, are allowed, as are noodles and ramen. But bid adieu to those accompanying spice packets containing egg or meat. 960 1280

Claudiad  

Fish

Fish

Surprisingly, there aren’t tight restrictions on fish and seafood, as long as they’re personal quantities. If so, then canned, smoked, dried and frozen are all acceptable, and even fresh fish is allowed. (However, if you’re flying, your seatmates may not appreciate this fact.) 960 1280

4kodiak  

Meat and Poultry

Meat and Poultry

This category generally isn’t allowed, whether it’s cooked, dried, cured, frozen or a meat-based dried soup mix. Canned meat is the one exception that is sometimes permitted, but with additional exceptions: it can’t be lamb or goat, or come from countries with Mad Cow Disease—including Canada. Pork has further restrictions if it’s from Mexico; you can bring a small amount as part of a meal, but any other kind, including canned, will get tossed. 960 1280

John S Lander  

United States

United States

It should be noted that even in countries without a tipping history, an increasing number of people in the service industry, especially in touristy areas, have come to expect tips from Americans, even if they don’t expect tips from the locals. In those cases, tipping is discretionary.

Prices throughout are in dollars, so remember to convert to local currency. It’s also best to tip cash in the local currency whenever possible. Finally, more upscale establishments and services will command larger tips, which are reflected in the price ranges.

Starting with the U.S., unless a service charge has been added, tip 15 to 20 percent of the total bill, before tax, at restaurants. Bear in mind that waiters earn as little as $2.13 an hour before tips in many states. If there’s a coat check, leave $1 to $2 unless there’s a fixed price. Leave $1 to $2 a drink at bars, unless you also ordered food. In that case, tip 15 to 20 percent. There’s no obligation to leave anything in the tip jars that are commonly found at coffee shops and take-out spots, but $1 will suffice for good service.
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Canada

Canada

Canada generally follows similar guidelines as the U.S., so tip 15 to 20 percent at restaurants. Exceptions would include counter service, since tip jars aren’t as common. 960 1280

  

Mexico

Mexico

Tipping guidelines are similar to the U.S., so tip 10 to 15 percent in restaurants and bars. 960 1280

  

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

Restaurants, especially in cities, often add a service charge. If not, tip 10 to 15 percent. Tipping isn’t expected at pubs or fast-food places. 960 1280

  

France

France

Restaurants, cafes and bars typically add a service charge, or service compris, to the bill. If not, it’s customary to leave up to 15 percent for good service. 960 1280

  

Italy

Italy

Some restaurants include a cover charge, known as pane e coperto, and/or a service charge, or servizio. However, the Lazio region (which includes Rome) has banned the pane e coperto charge. It’s worth noting that additional tipping isn’t expected, whether or not those charges appear on a bill, aside from rounding up the bill. It’s also not expected at bars unless you ordered table service. In those instances, round up the bill as well. 960 1280

  

Spain

Spain

Tipping (propina) generally isn’t required or expected. If the service at a higher-end restaurant was good, leave 10 percent. You can simply round up the bill everywhere else. 960 1280

  

Croatia

Croatia

Tipping generally isn’t required or expected in Croatia either. Round up the bill at casual spots, and tip 10 to 15 percent at nicer establishments.    960 1280

  

Scandinavia

Scandinavia

In Scandinavia, which includes Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland, a service charge is typically added at restaurants and bars, so there’s no need to tip more. However, it’s common practice to round up the bill. It’s also customary to tip 10 percent at upscale restaurants. 960 1280

  

Turkey

Turkey

Tipping, or baksheesh, is expected in major cities and touristy areas. It’s customary to tip 10 percent unless a service charge (servis dahil) is already included. Have Turkish lira on hand, since unlike other countries, you can’t add the tip on a credit card. Round up the bill at bars. 960 1280

  

Russia

Russia

Service charges aren’t usually added, so tip 10 percent. Only tip in bars if you received table service. 960 1280

  

Middle East

Middle East

Culturally, tipping is expected throughout the region. Tip amounts vary from country to country, and should be given discreetly.

Israel: If a service charge is added, simply round up the bill. If it’s not, tip 10 to 15 percent.

United Arab Emirates (UAE): This includes Dubai and Abu Dhabi. A 10 percent service charge is often added, along with a six percent tourism tax. It’s not uncommon to tip 10 to 15 percent on top of this for good service. If these charges aren’t added, tip 10 to 15 percent.

Egypt: A 10 percent service charge is often included in the bill, but it’s common to add an additional 10 percent since the service charge goes only to the restaurant, not the waitstaff.
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Morocco

Morocco

Tip 10 percent, unless a service charge is already added. Round up the bill at bars. 960 1280

  

South Africa

South Africa

Unless there’s a service charge, tip 10 to 15 percent. Round up the bill at bars. 960 1280

  

India

India

Tipping culture in India is complicated, with as many exceptions as rules. While tipping isn’t required, some service providers in large cities and touristy areas may expect them. Keep in mind that amounts are discretionary. Tip 10 percent at restaurants and bars unless a service charge is added. 960 1280

  

China and Hong Kong

China and Hong Kong

Tipping has long been considered a rude practice in China, although that mindset is slowly changing. Generally tips aren’t expected at local spots, but service charges have become more common in tourist areas. Hong Kong is the exception, where tipping is a more common practice.

Some upscale businesses may include a 10 to 15 percent service charge; otherwise don’t tip in China. Many Hong Kong restaurants add a 10 to 15 percent service charge, in which case you only need to round up the bill. Bartenders don’t expect tips.
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Singapore

Singapore

Generally there is no tipping throughout Southeast Asia, but it’s not an uncommon practice at upscale or Western hotels and restaurants. However, there are some exceptions in the region.

Tipping in Singapore isn’t necessarily expected, but it’s become more common as a result of a sizable expat community and international visitors. Restaurants often add a 10 percent service charge, and additional tipping is optional.
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Philippines

Philippines

Tipping has become a more accepted practice, particularly in the tourism industry. Many restaurants and bars include a 10 percent service charge; if not, tip about 10 percent. Round up the bill at bars. 960 1280

  

Thailand

Thailand

Upscale eateries typically add a 10 percent service charge; if not, tip 10 percent. Round up the bill at more modest spots. 960 1280

  

Japan

Japan

Similar to China, Japan maintains a no-tipping culture, to the extent where giving a tip can be considered rude. At restaurants, it's not unheard of for waiters to run after customers in order to return the tip.

In the rare cases when you feel you must tip, leave the money in an envelope.
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Australia

Australia

Tipping isn’t expected at most establishments or bars. Leave 10 percent at high-end restaurants. 960 1280

  

Brazil

Brazil

A 10 percent service charge is commonly added at restaurants; if not, tip 10 percent. 960 1280

  

Caribbean

Caribbean

It’s customary to tip 10 to 15 percent at restaurants and bars.

In conclusion, an overall rule of thumb for tipping around the world is that when in doubt, tip 10 percent in countries that have tipping practices. In countries that don’t, such as Japan, consider giving a small, thoughtful gift for service that went above and beyond.
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Invest in Foreign Markets

Invest in Foreign Markets

Research ahead of time if there’s going to be a farmers’ market near you. Use the website Local Harvest to find farmers' markets throughout the U.S. When traveling abroad, markets are the perfect way to really get to know an area, be it your own city or one in another country. It’s a great way to practice language skills and learn about local culture, meet people, find out about good restaurants and learn about what else is going on during your stay. There’s plenty available to snack on even if you’re not planning to cook during your visit. If you’d like to bring any produce home from other countries, check the federal customs regulations first.  960 1280

pixdeluxe  

Cart Smart

Cart Smart

Farmers markets can get crowded, and cumbersome wagons can become more of a burden than a help. Markets are often set up on dirt or gravel lots, which can be difficult with smaller wheels, too. Consider collapsible rolling carts or caddies with larger wheels that have a more manageable profile. Backpacks are also handy when traveling. 960 1280

Kelly Sillaste  

Cash is King

Cash is King

More and more vendors can accept credit cards via smart phone apps, but these frequently still have connection issues, and many vendors choose not to mess with credit cards at all. Small bills will always be greatly appreciated.     960 1280

wherelifeishidden  

Talk to People

Talk to People

This simple outing can teach you so much about different cultures. Ask questions at every booth. Get to know fellow shoppers and learn what their favorite recipes are, what foods they eat the most, and what booths or vendors you can't miss at the market.  960 1280

M_a_y_a  

Made in the Shade

Made in the Shade

There’s often precious little shade at farmers markets, especially as the day wears on, so make sure to prepare with hats, sunscreen and water for everyone in your party. Comfortable shoes will be appreciated, too.     960 1280

vm  

Paws Before Taking Fido

Paws Before Taking Fido

Farmer’s markets can be a great time to spend walking together with your best furry friend. But many markets have asked that dogs stay home, if not out-right banned canines. Check if the market is dog-friendly before going. Some markets may even have a dog park or area set up that has water and shade. If not, make sure to bring water for your dog, and consider the temperature before leaving your dog in a vehicle while you shop.     960 1280

Hero Images  

Keep It Cool

Keep It Cool

Bring reusable ice packs to keep your purchases cool as you peruse under the summer sun. You can also keep a cooler in your vehicle for storing purchases, if it’s convenient, so you don’t have to carry them around. Insulated lunch boxes can be carried in backpacks, bicycle panniers and other bags for ease. Often, you may want to go out to breakfast or lunch after the market, and a cooler with ice packs will keep your purchases fresh while you enjoy the rest of your day. 960 1280

  

Shop Talk

Shop Talk

When vendors aren’t busy ask about their farms and if they supply local restaurants, if they are online and if they invite the public to visit their farms and buy direct. Establishing a relationship with local food producers helps you get the best produce and creates closer ties with the local growers’ community.  960 1280

Hero Images  

Good Things to Come

Good Things to Come

If you're staying in a country for a semester or longer period of time, ask vendors what produce they’ll have later in the season, and start researching recipes. They may also recommend other vendors' produce and share recipes. Ask what they do during the winter months for fresh, local food. 960 1280

Slavina  

Get Involved

Get Involved

Consider volunteering at the local farmers’ market on your next trip. It's a great way to meet people. From setting up booths to engaging with social media, there are plenty of areas in which to help out. Booking live music, answering SNAP and EBT questions, setting up chairs, greeting visitors and answering general questions are all areas where volunteers are needed. Find the market’s information booth (staffed by volunteers) and ask about how to help.

 

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Steve Debenport  

Educational Eats

Museum of Food & Drink in Brooklyn, New York
Museum of Food & Drink

Museum of Food & Drink

In Brooklyn, the Museum of Food & Drink enables visitors to explore all aspects of food and drink, including food production, distribution, history, even food challenges and solutions. Make “Flavor: Making It and Faking It” your first stop inside the museum for a sniff of all different flavors created by the flavor industry. The museum offers monthly events for a deeper look at segments of the food industry, like the history of ice cream. As a bonus, look for free tastings. 960 1280

Francis Dzikowski  

Cologne Chocolate Museum

Cologne Chocolate Museum

Chocolate lovers, hop the next Germany-bound plane to spend the day at the Cologne Chocolate Museum (Schokoladenmuseum Koln). Several guided tours share the story of chocolate, ranging from a typical bean to bar tour, to guided tours that focus on chocolate advertising and fair trade programs. When you arrive, take a few moments to be awed by the nine-foot tall chocolate fountain filled with Lindt chocolates that are free to visitors. You can also make your own chocolate bar or learn how to pair beer and chocolate. 960 1280

Schokoladenmuseum Koeln  

Cite du Vin

Cite du Vin

Cite du Vin is a brand new wine museum in Bordeaux, France that has everyone talking, but even better, the cultural facility serves up wine to visitors (even grape juices to the youngest guests). The museum is dedicated to the culture of wine, sharing an inside look at wines from across the world and the role they played throughout civilization. Sign up for “Upside Down,” a workshop that teaches visitors how to taste and experience wine with all their senses. The workshop concludes with tastings in the Belvedere space. 960 1280

La Cite du Vin  

Gingerbread Museum

Gingerbread Museum

In Poland, the Gingerbread Museum (Muzeum Piernika) gives visitors a first-hand look at the rituals and traditions involved in the baking of gingerbread. More than walking around to look at exhibits, the museum is interactive and guests learn about gingerbread from a storyteller. Museum guests also make, bake and eat their own gingerbread. They can even ice their gingerbread creations or take part in a gingerbread decorating workshop. Delicious fresh-baked gingerbread is for sale in the gift shop. 960 1280

Muzeum Piernika  

Idaho Potato Museum

Idaho Potato Museum

In Blackfoot, Idaho, you’ll want to pose for a selfie with what may be the largest baked potato in the world that sits just outside the Idaho Potato Museum. Inside, look for multiple displays on the history of the potato, a short video on how the potato industry developed and lots of potato-themed memorabilia. You’ll even see the largest potato chip made by the Pringle’s Company. At the end, every guest receives a free packet of Hungry Jack instant potatoes and an Idaho Potatoes lapel pin to mark their visit. 960 1280

Erin Gifford  

Currywurst Museum

Currywurst Museum

Currywurst may not be a dish known to many Americans, but this fried Bratwurst seasoned with curry ketchup is a top fast food pick by many Germans. So it comes as no surprise to see a Currywurst Museum in Berlin. Start your visit with a stop in the Spice Chamber, which has sniffing stations, a sausage-shaped couch and ketchup bottle audio stations with Currywurst songs. Each ticket includes a complimentary “Currywurst in the Cup.” 960 1280

Deutsches Currywurst Museum   

Vivanco Museum of Wine Culture

Vivanco Museum of Wine Culture

Known globally for its wines, Spain’s Vivanco Museum of Wine Culture seeks to explain it all from grape to glass at this winemaking museum, which spans across six exhibition halls. You’ll find a garden with more than 220 wine grape varieties, as well as short films that address the ins and outs of winemaking, the history of bottling, marketing and wine transportation. Learn how to open a bottle without a corkscrew before settling in for a couple of tastings or a two-hour class with a world-class sommelier. 960 1280

Vivanco Museum of Wine Culture   

National Mustard Museum

National Mustard Museum

In Wisconsin, you’ll find an entire museum dedicated to one of the most popular condiments. At the National Mustard Museum, you can view more than 5,600 jars of mustard from all 50 states and more than 70 countries. You’ll also find vintage mustard ads, memorabilia and a Great Wall of Mustard. Visit the Tasting Bar to sample mustards of all kinds, from sweet to alarmingly hot, with the help of a Confidential Condiment Counselor who will help you find your most compatible mustard. 960 1280

National Mustard Museum   

Cupnoodles Museum

Cupnoodles Museum

In Japan, you’ll want to reminisce the good old days at a museum with exhibits that are all about instant ramen, a staple among many a college student. At the Cupnoodles Museum just outside Tokyo, museum visitors can check out more than 3,000 different packages of ramen noodles before entering the Chicken Ramen Factory to make their own ramen noodles by hand to take home with them. Visitors will also learn all about Momofuku Ando, the founder of Nissin Food Products and the inventor of Chicken Ramen. 960 1280

Amy Gustafson Mitchell / Adventures with Amy & John  

Koutsoyannopoulos Wine Museum

Koutsoyannopoulos Wine Museum

In Santorini, Greece, the Koutsoyannopoulos Wine Museum is located underground, inside a natural cave. Life-size figures tell the story of winemaking in Santorini through the eyes of a winemaking family that spans four generations. Visitors learn about the history of wine through the ages before tasting four leading wines produced by the Koutsoyannopoulos Winery. Those who really want to get hands-on (maybe, feet-on) can sign up for the Grape Stomping Experience to crush grapes in an outdoor vat. 960 1280

Koutsoyannopoulos Wine Museum  

International Culinary Center
International Culinary Center, New York and California

International Culinary Center, New York and California

After decades of educating students in fundamental French techniques, the iconic cooking school in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood formerly known as the French Culinary Institute expanded to become the ICC, and added another campus in California’s Silicon Valley. Famous food names Bobby Flay, Dan Barber, and Christina Tosi are just a few on the illustrious alumni list. Aspiring bakers can enroll in a professional program in Pastry Arts, Cake Techniques & Design, or the Art of International Bread Baking, while curious cooks can sign up for one of the many one-day recreational courses—Cream Puffs; Eclairs & More; Donuts, Fritters & More; Macaroons & Madeleines; and even local NYC specialties of bagels and pretzels all sound good to us. 960 1280

NOAH FECKS  

International Culinary Education (ICE), New York

International Culinary Education (ICE), New York

Knead, frost, and taste your way through a comprehensive collection of pastry and baking classes at ICE in NYC. Their lineup of niche treats is ideal for enthusiasts who want to nerd out on a specific baked goodie. Choose from dozens of recreational classes including The Artisan Doughnut, Brioche Brunch; Truffles, Truffles, Truffles; Making Artisan Cheesecake; or Shortcakes and Cobblers—and then take home the fruits of your labor. 960 1280

  

Culinary Institute of America

Culinary Institute of America

In addition to their renowned full-time programs across all culinary disciplines, the CIA offers Saturday Kitchens baking classes in Hyde Park, N.Y., St. Helena, California and San Antonio, Texas for those looking to take a class in their famed kitchens. Beginning bakers, seasoned gourmets, and all-around food lovers get instruction and guidance from expert CIA chefs, as well as an official CIA apron and chef’s hat. Try: Everything Chocolate, Pies & Tarts, Gluten-Free Baking, and Baking for Brunch. 960 1280

Education Images  

Magnolia Bakery, N.Y.C., Chicago and L.A.

Magnolia Bakery, N.Y.C., Chicago and L.A.

The birthplace of the country’s cupcake craze, Magnolia Bakery in NYC now offers icing classes to aspiring cupcake confectioners in three of its locations across the country—Manhattan (Upper West Side store), Chicago, and Los Angeles. Each hour and a half class has a theme, from classic to specialty-filled and holiday-decorated cupcakes, and features techniques such as flower cupcakes, piped cupcakes, inscriptions, and even Magnolia Bakery’s signature cupcake swirl. For icing on the cake, participants take home their sweet treats—six cupcakes or a full cake, depending on the class. 960 1280

  

Hot Stove Society, Seattle, Washington

Hot Stove Society, Seattle, Washington

Tom Douglas is the king of Seattle cuisine and you can learn a thing or two (or more) from the mastermind and his team at his Hot Stove Society cooking school. The year-round cooking school, operated by Tom Douglas Restaurants and led by director Bridget Charters, is located in a bright industrial space inside the stylish Hotel Andra (and as an extra perk, the hotel offers a 20 percent discount on room rates for students taking a class). Learn how to bake their world famous Triple Coconut Cream Pie (President Obama is a fan), or seasonal shortcakes with pastry chef Stacy Fortner. Junior chefs can get started with a Kids Baking Series featuring cupcakes, cakes, muffins, quick breads, biscuits, or two-day Teen Bread Baker course. 960 1280

dibrova / Getty Images / iStockphoto  

San Francisco Cooking School

San Francisco Cooking School

As a long-time instructor at San Francisco’s beloved Tante Marie’s Cooking School, Jodi Liano’s program focuses on “culinary intuition”—arming students with the crucial skills needed to work successfully in the industry. Opened in the fall of 2012, San Francisco Cooking School offers more than 70 hands-on recreational cooking classes, the largest program of recreational classes on the West Coast. Their lineup of amazingly-fun baking topics includes donuts and fritters, summer pies, cookie decorating, and more. Aspiring pros can partake in Plue’s Pastry Workshop “Repertoire Series” of chocolate cake, lemon tart, pavlova, and pâte à choux, taught by award-winning Head Pastry Instructor Nicole Plue. 960 1280

  

Le Cordon Blue, Paris, France

Le Cordon Blue, Paris, France

While sadly the schools in the U.S. are in the process of closing, pastry enthusiasts can still make a pilgrimage to Paris to take a short course at the penultimate in gourmet culinary education, Le Cordon Bleu. These culinary workshops take place in practical or demonstration classrooms and give small groups of participants as much exposure as possible to the environment of a professional kitchen. Uncover your passion for pastry with: The Secrets of Macaroons, The Secrets of Eclairs, The Secrets of Tarts, Financiers, Pound Cakes and Cakes Workshop, Tart Workshop, Making Your Own Bread, or Freshly Baked Pastries. 960 1280

Emilie Burgat  

Le Gargantua, Anzex, France

Le Gargantua, Anzex, France

This week-long pastry course tucked away in a restored farmhouse in the French countryside near Bordeaux is a nice compliment to the bigger names and bigger cities on the list. At Le Gargantua, the host’s kind and generous hospitality includes lodging, all meals, local wine, and field trips to bakeries in the nearby town. The course covers a comprehensive list of French show-stopping staples, from eclairs with a variety of crème pâtissière fillings to tarte au citron with a pâte sablée crust, and is appropriate for beginners and more advanced students alike. Local immersion in such an idyllic setting proves that sometimes there really is nothing like learning in the heart of where things started. 960 1280

  

Bread Ahead, London, United Kingdom

Bread Ahead, London, United Kingdom

The Bread Ahead bakery school opened in February 2014 in the heart of London’s foodie heaven, Borough Market, and excels in showing the public just how easy baking good bread from a variety of cuisines can be. Founders Matt Jones (of Flour Power City) and Justin Gellatly (formerly Head Baker at St. John Bakery) love great bread, and their robust lineup of baking classes includes workshops on donuts, pizza, croissants, and super specialized lessons in Middle Eastern Flatbread, Celtic Baking, Nordic Baking, and even the popular German Christmas bread, Stollen. Not sure where to start? The donuts are to-die-for. 960 1280

  

Ballymaloe Cookery, Shanagarry, County Cork, Ireland

Ballymaloe Cookery, Shanagarry, County Cork, Ireland

World renowned for its 12-week intensive certificate program, Ballymaloe Cookery School also offers day-long, week-long, and afternoon courses on its 100-acre organic farm in southeast Ireland on the edge of the Irish Sea. The curriculum focuses on Irish, British, and French classics, and baking sessions include: Afternoon Tea & Cakes, Decorating Celebration Cakes, along with numerous home entertaining and holiday courses. Get a taste of the school with a short course, but cooking enthusiasts should be forewarned that they may be tempted to stay for the entire three-month immersive course—the cows are just that cute. 960 1280

  

Los Dos Kitchen, Mexico
Los Dos, Merida, Mexico

Los Dos, Merida, Mexico

The most popular class in Chef David Sterling’s Merida, Mexico cooking school Los Dos is “Taste of Yucatán.” The class includes an overview of Maya techniques and ingredients, a market tour, culinary instruction, and a full afternoon meal. 960 1280

Eduardo Cervantes  

School of Artisan Food, North Nottinghamshire, England

School of Artisan Food, North Nottinghamshire, England

Located in Sherwood Forest (yes, Sherwood Forest of Robin Hood fame), the Schoolof Artisan Food in North Nottinghamshire teaches all levels of students, including one-day classes in cheese making, bread baking and sausage making. 960 1280

John Bradley  

Giuliano Hazan’s Northern Italy Cooking School, Verona, Italy

Giuliano Hazan’s Northern Italy Cooking School, Verona, Italy

In this one-week immersive food and wine course with Giuliano Hazan, chef, cookbook author and son of Marcella Hazan, the godmother of Italian cooking, guests learn to make homemade pasta, risotto, meatballs and more. The class takes place in a sixteenth century villa in the heart of northern Italy’s wine country, where guests stay in luxury accomodations. 960 1280

Pettene Flavio  

James St. Cooking School, Brisbane, Australia

James St. Cooking School, Brisbane, Australia

With a variety of hands-on classes ranging from Modern Australian Cooking to Dude Food (meat-heavy, si