11 Best Market Meals Around the World

What better way to taste your way around the world than to sample the delicacies of the world's best food markets?

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St. George Spirits in California
St. George Spirits; Alameda, California

St. George Spirits; Alameda, California

St. George is stretching the boundaries of traditional styles of gin, very successfully. More than 30 years ago, a young German man named Jorg Rupf fell in love with the Bay Area’s food culture and the quality of fruit growing in California, and subsequently founded St. George Spirits in 1982. He began making eau de vie (a clear, colorless fruit brandy) from pears, raspberries, cherries, and even kiwi fruit before there was a craft distillation movement in the U.S. to speak of. A lot of early gin distillers here kept to a London Dry style, which is very juniper-forward, but as the editor of Bevvy.co notes, now distillers are creating modern gins that are a lot more diverse. “Citrus peel is one of the botanicals that has come to the forefront, and local herbs and spices are becoming popular with people who want to make gin with a bit of hometown pride. St. George Terroir Gin is a great example of that, it tastes like the California coast.” 960 1280

  

Koval Distillery; Chicago, Illinois

Koval Distillery; Chicago, Illinois

The first distillery in Chicago since well before Prohibition, Koval was founded by a dynamic husband and wife duo who are changing the way America distills. Dr. Robert Birnecker and Dr. Sonat Birnecker-Hart have won countless awards for their dry gins, 100 percent Midwestern grown organic rye whiskey, millet-based bourbon, and more. The power couple also prioritizes education, hosting a selection of cocktail classes and whiskey workshops at their North Ravenswood Ave location. Talent seems to run in the family—their distinctive laser-cut labels have also received a lot of attention, designed by Sonat’s sister and her firm Dando Projects. 960 1280

Jaclyn Simpson  

Seven Stills; San Francisco, California

Seven Stills; San Francisco, California

Tim and Clint of Seven Stills Distillery started out by coming at everything backwards—no one was pushing whiskey from the beer angle, but a huge craft beer segment in the San Francisco Bay Area along with their extensive beer knowledge provided a nice segue into making whiskey from extremely high-quality craft brew. Now their robust road map of spirits includes “a still for every hill” in San Francisco using a different artist to design each bottle (Chocasmoke is made from a chocolate-oatmeal stout in honor of Twin Peaks, and Fluxuate is distilled from a coffee porter to celebrate a rapidly-changing, post-Gold Rush Rincon Hill), to add to their collection of small-batch, seasonal bitters like Meyer lemon, prickly pear, and cranberry. 960 1280

  

Clear Creek; Portland, Oregon

Clear Creek; Portland, Oregon

For the past three decades, Clear Creek Distillery has been honoring the intimate marriage between farming and distilling, utilizing the world-class fruit from the farms around their Portland, Oregon home base. Well known for its eau de vie (a clear, colorless fruit brandy), Clear Creek’s diverse portfolio of more than 25 products rivals the best of their European counterparts, and is anchored by the flagship Williams Pear Brandy, which has been named one of the top spirits in the world. 960 1280

  

House Spirits Distillery; Portland, Oregon

House Spirits Distillery; Portland, Oregon

Beloved and very well respected in the industry, House Spirits Distillery is making whiskeys that have been listed among the best in their categories. Their Westward Oregon Straight Malt Whiskey matures in new American oak barrels for at least two years, allowing Oregon’s dry, hot summers and wet, cold winters to contribute to its rich, smooth flavor. Accompanied by Aviation American Gin, Krogstad Aquavit, and Volstead Vodka, almost everything in their line of spirits is ideal for mixing a cocktail. Their new distillery and tasting room on Portland’s famous distillery row opened to the public in November 2015, and hosts regular classes on making whiskey, cocktails, and bitters. 960 1280

  

Kings County Distillery; Brooklyn, New York

Kings County Distillery; Brooklyn, New York

The founders of Kings County Distillery quite literally wrote the book on making whiskey a thome. Their Guide to Urban Moonshining is a look at America’s indigenous spirt, from the whiskey made by the early colonists and sprawling distilleries of Kentucky to the adventurous, modern-day craft distillers across almost every state. This is all quite fitting, as they run NewYork City’s oldest operating whiskey distillery, the first since Prohibition, located in the iconic Brooklyn Navy Yard and just steps from the legendary site of the Brooklyn Whiskey Wars of the 1860s. Their moonshine, bourbon, peated bourbon, and barrel strength bourbon have all won numerous awards, along with their recent accolade of being named Distillery of the Year in 2016 from the American Distilling Institute. 960 1280

Valery Rizzo  

Corsair Distillery; Nashville, Tennessee

Corsair Distillery; Nashville, Tennessee

Corsair founders Darek and Andrew are Nashville natives who have been collaborating since high school. They began by home brewing beer and wine in Darek’s garage, but soon decided that whiskey would be “much more satisfying.” Their adventurous, innovative, and big-flavored craft whiskeys—including a quinoa whiskey, a handful of rye whiskeys, some malt whiskeys, and more—consistently receive high marks among respectable critics, along with countless international spirit awards. Ones to try: Triple Smoke Malt Whiskey and Wry Moon Unaged Rye Whiskey. 960 1280

Andrea Behrends  

Few Spirits; Evanston, Illinois

Few Spirits; Evanston, Illinois

Named after suffragette and temperance advocate Frances Elizabeth Willard (FEW), Few Spirits is a true grass-to-grain distillery, sourcing all of their grain (corn, wheat, rye, and barley) from no more than 150 miles away. It is also the first (legal) alcohol-production facility of any kind in Evanston, a city that banned alcohol sales for four decades beyond the end of Prohibition. Their bottles show up everywhere among the craft spirit community, and their rye whiskey has received acclaim as Whisky Advocate’s 2013 Craft Whiskey of the Year, as a gold medal winner in the 2014 World Whisky Awards, and was rated one of the top five whiskies in the world by the Beverage Tasting Institute. 960 1280

  

Death's Door Spirits; Middleton, Wisconsin

Death's Door Spirits; Middleton, Wisconsin

What was once a robust potato farming region, Washington Island, Wisconsin fell prey to vertical integration in the potato industry in the early 1970s. More than 30 years later, two brothers started growing wheat on the island and soon Death’s Door Spirits was born, focusing from the beginning on how to support local and sustainable agriculture on the island. Death’s Door pioneered white whisky, which became very popular as a cocktail ingredient, featuring an 80:20 ratio of Washington Island Wheat to malted barley from Chilton, Wisconsin. Other Death’s Door family members include a London Dry style gin, a double-distilled vodka, and Wondermint Schnapps Liqueur—the first and only artisan craft peppermint schnapps in the world. 960 1280

  

Montanya Distillers; Crested Butte, Colorado

Montanya Distillers; Crested Butte, Colorado

Montanya Distillers are best known as purveyors of high-altitude craft rum, distilled in the breathtaking Rocky Mountains. Not surprisingly, their ingredients list reads as an ode to America’s inspiring outdoor beauty: Non-GMO sugar cane from family farmers in Louisiana who grow and mill for them; water from one of the purest spring and snowmelt charged aquifers in the USA; and they even heat their building from the alembic copper pot stills. Award-winning Montanya Platino and Oro rums are joined by a limited-release Exclusiva rum that is aged for 30 months in American white oak barrels and then finished in French oak barrels that previously held Sutcliffe Vineyards’ Port. 960 1280

  

shawarma, meat, gyro
Shawarma

Shawarma

Delicious Middle Eastern spices are infused into either lamb, chicken, turkey, beef or veal, and then the meat is slow-cooked for nearly 24 hours to create shawarma. The most popular ways to eat shawarma are in a gyro or with flatbread (aka taboon bread). Find shawarma at countless places in Jerusalem, including Hamarosh and Moshiko. 960 1280

Rez-Art/iStock/Getty Images  

Falafel

Falafel

The falafel, made of fava beans and/or chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans), is extremely good and healthy. It's normally topped with a variety of ingredients, including tahini, cucumbers, tomatoes and more. Almost always sold alongside shawarma, falafel has found its way to the West, quickly becoming a go-to for a quick meal in large cities such as New York City  and Washington, D.C. 960 1280

Justin Michau/iStock/Getty Images  

Rugelach

Rugelach

This gem is made of yeast-leavened, sour cream or cream cheese dough that’s filled with some of the sweetest combinations around: raisins, walnuts, cinnamon, chocolate, marzipan, poppy seeds or fruit preserves. When in Jerusalem, try rugelach at the popular Marzipan Bakery. 960 1280

Alexandra Grablewski/Digital Vision/Getty Image  

Beigeleh

Beigeleh

A tasty treat similar to its Italian cousin, the pretzel, beigeleh (or ka'ak in Arabic) is rolled-up dough covered in sesame seeds and served with an herb packet of za'atar for dipping. Beigeleh is sold on the streets in the Christian and Muslim quarters of Jerusalem's Old City.

Related: Jerusalem's Dome of the Rock

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Alexeys/iStock/Getty Images  

Musakhan

Musakhan

Incredible flavors, along with a tasty bird, top a piece of taboon bread for musakhan. Cardamom, black pepper, olive oil and onions — to name a few of the ingredients — make this dish very tasty. Enjoy it from vendors in the Muslim Quarter or at Philadelphia Restaurant in East Jerusalem. 960 1280

Paul Cowan/iStock/Getty Images  

Hummus

Hummus

Usually served with taboon bread, hummus consists of ground chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans) with sesame seeds, olive oil, lemon and garlic. The Middle Eastern staple comes with almost every dish. New twists on traditional hummus include adding eggplant, sun-dried tomatoes, figs, spinach, feta and countless other combinations. 960 1280

Silvia Jansen/Getty Images  

Sachlab

Sachlab

Sachlab, a pudding-drink made from a certain orchid plant, is served hot and enjoyed with coconut shavings, nuts and cinnamon. If you're up for trying something new, sample sachlab at the 24-hour Mifgash HaSheikh café. 960 1280

Kerim Heper/iStock/Getty Images  

Lamb

Lamb

Served a variety of ways (e.g., shawarma), lamb is a staple meat in Jerusalem. Enjoy it slow-cooked at Darna, a fine-dining Moroccan restaurant in Jerusalem.

Related: Moroccan Goat Tagine

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Stok-Yard Studio/Photolibrary/Getty Images  

Beef and Lamb Burgers

Beef and Lamb Burgers

They're probably not the first thing you think about eating in Jerusalem, but burgers made of juicy lamb and tender beef are served at the popular Black Bar 'n' Burger in the New City. Top your burger  with traditional items, such as garlic baked in olive oil, duck breast with hot peppers, and, of course, hummus, if you wish. 960 1280

Danielkrieger.com/Moment/Getty Images  

Kebabs

Kebabs

Kebabs (called shipudim, or "skewers," in Hebrew) are the essential Middle Eastern cuisine. Simple to eat and really tasty, they consist of skewered cuts of meat — and, sometimes, veggies — on a stick. There are plenty of options all over Jerusalem, including Hashipudiya. 960 1280

Robynmac/iStock/Getty Images  

International Culinary Center
International Culinary Center, New York and California

International Culinary Center, New York and California

After decades of educating students in fundamental French techniques, the iconic cooking school in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood formerly known as the French Culinary Institute expanded to become the ICC, and added another campus in California’s Silicon Valley. Famous food names Bobby Flay, Dan Barber, and Christina Tosi are just a few on the illustrious alumni list. Aspiring bakers can enroll in a professional program in Pastry Arts, Cake Techniques & Design, or the Art of International Bread Baking, while curious cooks can sign up for one of the many one-day recreational courses—Cream Puffs; Eclairs & More; Donuts, Fritters & More; Macaroons & Madeleines; and even local NYC specialties of bagels and pretzels all sound good to us. 960 1280

NOAH FECKS  

International Culinary Education (ICE), New York

International Culinary Education (ICE), New York

Knead, frost, and taste your way through a comprehensive collection of pastry and baking classes at ICE in NYC. Their lineup of niche treats is ideal for enthusiasts who want to nerd out on a specific baked goodie. Choose from dozens of recreational classes including The Artisan Doughnut, Brioche Brunch; Truffles, Truffles, Truffles; Making Artisan Cheesecake; or Shortcakes and Cobblers—and then take home the fruits of your labor. 960 1280

  

Culinary Institute of America

Culinary Institute of America

In addition to their renowned full-time programs across all culinary disciplines, the CIA offers Saturday Kitchens baking classes in Hyde Park, N.Y., St. Helena, California and San Antonio, Texas for those looking to take a class in their famed kitchens. Beginning bakers, seasoned gourmets, and all-around food lovers get instruction and guidance from expert CIA chefs, as well as an official CIA apron and chef’s hat. Try: Everything Chocolate, Pies & Tarts, Gluten-Free Baking, and Baking for Brunch. 960 1280

Education Images  

Magnolia Bakery, N.Y.C., Chicago and L.A.

Magnolia Bakery, N.Y.C., Chicago and L.A.

The birthplace of the country’s cupcake craze, Magnolia Bakery in NYC now offers icing classes to aspiring cupcake confectioners in three of its locations across the country—Manhattan (Upper West Side store), Chicago, and Los Angeles. Each hour and a half class has a theme, from classic to specialty-filled and holiday-decorated cupcakes, and features techniques such as flower cupcakes, piped cupcakes, inscriptions, and even Magnolia Bakery’s signature cupcake swirl. For icing on the cake, participants take home their sweet treats—six cupcakes or a full cake, depending on the class. 960 1280

  

Hot Stove Society, Seattle, Washington

Hot Stove Society, Seattle, Washington

Tom Douglas is the king of Seattle cuisine and you can learn a thing or two (or more) from the mastermind and his team at his Hot Stove Society cooking school. The year-round cooking school, operated by Tom Douglas Restaurants and led by director Bridget Charters, is located in a bright industrial space inside the stylish Hotel Andra (and as an extra perk, the hotel offers a 20 percent discount on room rates for students taking a class). Learn how to bake their world famous Triple Coconut Cream Pie (President Obama is a fan), or seasonal shortcakes with pastry chef Stacy Fortner. Junior chefs can get started with a Kids Baking Series featuring cupcakes, cakes, muffins, quick breads, biscuits, or two-day Teen Bread Baker course. 960 1280

dibrova / Getty Images / iStockphoto  

San Francisco Cooking School

San Francisco Cooking School

As a long-time instructor at San Francisco’s beloved Tante Marie’s Cooking School, Jodi Liano’s program focuses on “culinary intuition”—arming students with the crucial skills needed to work successfully in the industry. Opened in the fall of 2012, San Francisco Cooking School offers more than 70 hands-on recreational cooking classes, the largest program of recreational classes on the West Coast. Their lineup of amazingly-fun baking topics includes donuts and fritters, summer pies, cookie decorating, and more. Aspiring pros can partake in Plue’s Pastry Workshop “Repertoire Series” of chocolate cake, lemon tart, pavlova, and pâte à choux, taught by award-winning Head Pastry Instructor Nicole Plue. 960 1280

  

Le Cordon Blue, Paris, France

Le Cordon Blue, Paris, France

While sadly the schools in the U.S. are in the process of closing, pastry enthusiasts can still make a pilgrimage to Paris to take a short course at the penultimate in gourmet culinary education, Le Cordon Bleu. These culinary workshops take place in practical or demonstration classrooms and give small groups of participants as much exposure as possible to the environment of a professional kitchen. Uncover your passion for pastry with: The Secrets of Macaroons, The Secrets of Eclairs, The Secrets of Tarts, Financiers, Pound Cakes and Cakes Workshop, Tart Workshop, Making Your Own Bread, or Freshly Baked Pastries. 960 1280

Emilie Burgat  

Le Gargantua, Anzex, France

Le Gargantua, Anzex, France

This week-long pastry course tucked away in a restored farmhouse in the French countryside near Bordeaux is a nice compliment to the bigger names and bigger cities on the list. At Le Gargantua, the host’s kind and generous hospitality includes lodging, all meals, local wine, and field trips to bakeries in the nearby town. The course covers a comprehensive list of French show-stopping staples, from eclairs with a variety of crème pâtissière fillings to tarte au citron with a pâte sablée crust, and is appropriate for beginners and more advanced students alike. Local immersion in such an idyllic setting proves that sometimes there really is nothing like learning in the heart of where things started. 960 1280

  

Bread Ahead, London, United Kingdom

Bread Ahead, London, United Kingdom

The Bread Ahead bakery school opened in February 2014 in the heart of London’s foodie heaven, Borough Market, and excels in showing the public just how easy baking good bread from a variety of cuisines can be. Founders Matt Jones (of Flour Power City) and Justin Gellatly (formerly Head Baker at St. John Bakery) love great bread, and their robust lineup of baking classes includes workshops on donuts, pizza, croissants, and super specialized lessons in Middle Eastern Flatbread, Celtic Baking, Nordic Baking, and even the popular German Christmas bread, Stollen. Not sure where to start? The donuts are to-die-for. 960 1280

  

Ballymaloe Cookery, Shanagarry, County Cork, Ireland

Ballymaloe Cookery, Shanagarry, County Cork, Ireland

World renowned for its 12-week intensive certificate program, Ballymaloe Cookery School also offers day-long, week-long, and afternoon courses on its 100-acre organic farm in southeast Ireland on the edge of the Irish Sea. The curriculum focuses on Irish, British, and French classics, and baking sessions include: Afternoon Tea & Cakes, Decorating Celebration Cakes, along with numerous home entertaining and holiday courses. Get a taste of the school with a short course, but cooking enthusiasts should be forewarned that they may be tempted to stay for the entire three-month immersive course—the cows are just that cute. 960 1280

  

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