Coffee Culture Around the World

From the simple Italian espresso shot to traditional Turkish coffee ceremonies, see how people around the world take their cup of coffee.

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Healthy breakfast: calientale 960 1280

Jared Andrukanis  

Followed by a sensible (and delicious) lunch! Followed--hopefully--by hours of laying around groaning and farting. 960 1280

Jared Andrukanis  

Cameraman and gearhead Zach Zamboni indulges his obsession with elaborate, improvised, homemade camera rigging devices. 960 1280

Jared Andrukanis  

The crew and our hosts, rooftop in Medellin. 960 1280

  

Tom Vitale, our producer. He actually met us at the airport dressed like this. Would you lend this guy 5 dollars? Not me. 960 1280

Jared Andrukanis  

Zach's Popeil-style miracle rigging installed and operational--with Todd in second position. 960 1280

Jared Andrukanis  

Andrew takes on Chicago where he uncovers some of the best food in the world. 960 1280

  

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Andrew and the production crew shoot a scene in front of the tomb of John the Baptist's head for the Syria episode of Bizarre Foods. 960 1280

  

Andrew milks a sheep in the desert outside Palmyra, Syria. 960 1280

  

Greek cookbook author Diane Kochilas invites Andrew into her home to show off some of her legendary cooking skills. 960 1280

  

Andrew Zimmern eats with Goschenhoppen Historians, Inc. at the historic Henry Antes house in Perkiomenville, PA. The group was founded in 1964 to preserve folk culture of the Pennsylvania Germans, the area's earliest settlers. 960 1280

  

Andrew Zimmern adds the key ingredient, a pig's head, to a boiling cauldron of scrapple in White Haven, PA. 960 1280

  

'These cheesy straw hats worn by gondoliers are an irresistible tourist trinket even for me.' ' Andrew Zimmern 960 1280

  

'I love Venetian seafood, especially when it's raw!' ' Andrew Zimmern 960 1280

  

Photographer Adrian Danciu takes a moment to take in the beautiful landscape in Lapland, Finland. 960 1280

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Andrew digs into a pot of seal meat with on Hailuoto Island, located off the northern coast of Finland. 960 1280

Adrian Danciu  

Andrew and his guide Rachel Raj pick up some fresh challah bread at Carimama Pizzazo in Hungary. 960 1280

  

Andrew dances in the rain with his new Roma friends in Paszab, a rural village in Hungary. 960 1280

  

Andrew Zimmern and his Jewish Quarter guide Rachel Raj discuss Jewish bread pudding. 960 1280

  

Andrew observes how local fishermen on Lake Balaton net large Busa carp. 960 1280

  

'My guide, Edison, explains some of the fascinating Himba rituals in Madagascar.' ' Andrew Zimmern 960 1280

  

'This is the backyard kitchen of a 'Smiley Den' in the Katatura slum of Namibia -- where the food is pretty hardcore.' ' Andrew Zimmern 960 1280

  

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Photos

Camp Cookery

Camp Cookery

Simple ingredients make up this warm, slightly spicy jambalaya dish that's cooked over a campfire. Note: The recipe can be cooked indoors over the stove, but what's the fun in that? >>Get the Recipe 960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Prep Time

Prep Time

Be sure to bring along necessities like a knife and cutting board for chopping the onions and peppers. You can also chop and dice ahead, but prepping dinner makes a nice group activity at your campsite.  960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Spicy Sausage

Spicy Sausage

What's jambalaya without sausage? Choose a hotter sausage if you love spicy food. >>Get the Recipe 960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Cooking Over Coals

Cooking Over Coals

Start your fire well before you plan on cooking; you'll need a solid bed of hot coals to get this dish cooked.  960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

By the Campfire

By the Campfire

Campers gather around the fire, waiting for dinner to cook.  960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Almost Done

Almost Done

The jambalaya dish is almost ready once the rice is cooked through. Then toss in shrimp to cook in just a couple minutes. >>Get the Recipe 960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Ready to Serve

Ready to Serve

Serve this one-pot jambalaya straight from the Dutch oven. Using paper bowls means more time for campsite lounging, and less time for campsite cleanup. Just be sure to pack out any trash.  960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Japan: Mochi Ice Cream

Japan: Mochi Ice Cream

This frozen treat fuses “the most American of treats (ice cream) and the most Japanese of desserts (mochi)” into an international taste sensation. The frozen sweet consists of golf-ball-sized mochi (sticky rice pounded into a soft texture) with an ice-cream filling in flavors like green tea and red bean. This popular Asian-American fusion dessert can be found in grocery stores all over the world. 960 1280

Charles Nguyen, Wikimedia Commons  

Vermont: Ben and Jerry's

Vermont: Ben and Jerry's

You can’t pass a ice-cream aisle without seeing this iconic American ice-cream brand staring you down, tempting you to try its latest concoction. It is the American ice dream -- two college grads, Ben and Jerry, open their first ice-cream shop in Burlington, VT, in 1978 and then take over the world ... one scoop of “Chunky Monkey” at a time. 960 1280

istock  

Italy: Gelato

Italy: Gelato

If you want to piss off an Italian, call gelato “ice cream.” While the two are quite similar in their deliciousness, gelato is typically denser and milkier than traditional ice cream. And the good news? Gelato contains less fat than ice cream, since it uses more milk than cream. And less fat means more room for flavor, like our favorites -- nocciola (hazelnut) and fragola (strawberry). 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Israel: Halva Ice Cream

Israel: Halva Ice Cream

Israel’s take on ice cream? Halva ice cream. Halva, a sweet candy-like treat made from sesame seeds mashed into a sugar-and-honey paste, is common in many Israeli dishes. On a hot day in Tel Aviv, cooling off with Halva ice cream is a popular pastime. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

France: Foie Gras Ice Cream

France: Foie Gras Ice Cream

Leave it to the French to turn their ice cream into a delicacy. While the world continues to debate the cruelty of making foie gras -- overfattened duck liver -- we think everyone can be in agreement that ice cream doesn’t need to include over-the-top ingredients to taste gourmet. You had us at vanilla. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Iran: Faloodeh

Iran: Faloodeh

On a warm summer day in Iran there’s nothing more refreshing than this Persian frozen dessert. Made of thin vermicelli noodles frozen with corn starch, rose water and lime juice, it’s a unique blend of citrus and floral tastes. 960 1280

Scott Dexter, flickr  

Turkey: Dondurma

Turkey: Dondurma

Stretchy ice cream? While it sounds unusual, Turkish ice cream, dondurma, has a similar pliability to taffy. The dondurma street vendors in Istanbul have fun with its pliable texture, wowing passerby with its ability to not fall off a stick or melt. It’s thickened with salep, a flour made from orchids, which only adds to its exotic appeal. 960 1280

istock  

Philippines: Cheese Ice Cream

Philippines: Cheese Ice Cream

Two comfort foods mix in this classic Filipino dessert, cheese ice cream. Once sold only by street vendors, today it’s crafted with real cheddar cheese by the brand Magnolia and sold in grocery stores all over the Philippines. 960 1280

istock  

Germany: Spaghetties

Germany: Spaghetties

While it might resemble pasta, Germany’s spaghettieis is vanilla ice cream drawn through a pastamaker and then topped with a strawberry topping (to look like tomato sauce). This playful play on pasta was created by an Italian in Germany in the 1960s and has been a popular dessert with kids and adults alike ever since. 960 1280

Christian Cable, flickr  

Alaska: Akutaq

Alaska: Akutaq

In a place with freezing temperatures, it’s hard to imagine a need for a cool-down dessert, but “Eskimo ice cream” is a popular local treat in Alaska. Traditionally, this native dish includes meat and fat from animals like seals, moose and caribou, although nowadays Crisco is a common substitute for animal fat. But seasonal ingredients like salmonberries and blueberries are still used in the modern version. 960 1280

Eric Ellefson, flickr  

India: Kulfi

India: Kulfi

A mix of condensed milk, sugar and exotic flavors like saffron and cardamom, this popular Indian frozen dessert has a dense texture more similar to custard than ice cream. Traditionally, this cool treat was only found in India’s street markets, kept frozen in earthenware pots of ice and salt. Now its popularity is so widespread, you can find it in Whole Foods’ frozen-food aisles. 960 1280

Getty Images  

U.S. Wide: Frozen Yogurt

U.S. Wide: Frozen Yogurt

After Americans had one too many Ben and Jerry’s pints, they dreamed of a way to satisfy their love for cold, creamy desserts … while maintaining their waistline. Thus, frozen yogurt was born in the late 1970s and took off in the 1980s all over the United States as a low-fat alternative to ice cream. America’s craving for lower fat varieties didn’t stop Ben and Jerry, though … those brilliant guys now even offer Greek frozen yogurt, the latest healthy frozen indulgence. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Berky’s Restaurant at Lee Hi Travel Plaza

Berky’s Restaurant at Lee Hi Travel Plaza

All day every day, Berky’s in Lexington, VA, dishes out simple, delicious American fare. 960 1280

  

Berky’s Restaurant at Lee Hi Travel Plaza

Berky’s Restaurant at Lee Hi Travel Plaza

For those looking for a bit more meat in their meal, try Berky’s signature “King of the Road,” a 1-pound chopped steak covered in fried onions and homemade brown gravy. 960 1280

  

Berky’s Restaurant at Lee Hi Travel Plaza

Berky’s Restaurant at Lee Hi Travel Plaza

If the "King of the Road" doesn’t tickle your fancy, check out the other hearty, homemade meals on their menu. 960 1280

  

Dysart’s Truck Stop and Restaurant

Dysart’s Truck Stop and Restaurant

Dysart’s in Bangor, ME, has been serving all-American comfort food to hungry truckers, lumberjacks and locals for generations. 960 1280

  

Dysart’s Truck Stop and Restaurant

Dysart’s Truck Stop and Restaurant

Anyone who’s been to Dysart’s knows you have to save room for their blueberry pie! 960 1280

  

Dysart’s Truck Stop and Restaurant

Dysart’s Truck Stop and Restaurant

In northern New England, hungry truckers pull into the world famous Dysart’s Truck Stop day and night because they know that this is the place that puts the “Yankee” into pot roast! 960 1280

  

R Place Restaurant

R Place Restaurant

When a driver finds a truck stop’s parking lot packed in the middle of the afternoon, he knows they’ve either got cheap gas, great food or both, and at R Place in Morris, IL, they’ll fill your tank not only with diesel, but with belly-busting burgers. 960 1280

  

R Place Restaurant

R Place Restaurant

R Place’s ginormous bakery is known for its homemade bread, handcrafted cakes and their famous German cream horns. 960 1280

  

R Place Restaurant

R Place Restaurant

It might be tempting to ogle the plethora of pastries, but don't spoil your dinner -- the menu at R Place boasts a huge variety of classic American fare! 960 1280

  

Tiger Truck Stop

Tiger Truck Stop

In Grosse Tete, LA, just 20 miles west of Baton Rouge, truckers know they can get some of the Bayou’s best homemade classics when they spot the Tiger Truck Stop. 960 1280

  

Iowa 80 Truck Stop

Iowa 80 Truck Stop

After a long day on the road, nothing fills a trucker’s tank like a buffet full of home-cooked comfort food from Iowa 80 Truck Stop in Walcott. 960 1280

  

Gramma's Kitchen

Gramma's Kitchen

Many who fuel up at Iowa 80 head to Gramma’s Kitchen across the street for a taste of Iowa’s unofficial state dish – the deep-fried pork tenderloin sandwich. Gramma’s has one of the best around. 960 1280

  

Gramma's Kitchen

Gramma's Kitchen

Real meat-and-potatoes meals and superb service make this one of the rare restaurants that truckers and travelers will go out their way for on every trip. 960 1280

  

Billy Bob's Texas Truck Stop

Billy Bob's Texas Truck Stop

The mega-roadhouse known as Billy Bob's Texas in Fort Worth spans over 127,000 square feet. 960 1280

  

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