10 Most Popular Road Trip Routes in the US

From "On the Road" to "Thelma and Louise" to "Easy Rider," is there any endeavor more American than the road trip? On these popular drives, getting there is more than half the fun.

Photos

The Glenn Highway National Scenic Byway

The Glenn Highway National Scenic Byway

The Glenn Highway (AK-1) travels north from Anchorage and past Chugach State Park to Glennallen 179 miles away, where it meets the Richardson Highway (AK-4). 960 1280

Z-lex  

Stretch Your Legs along the Glenn Highway

Stretch Your Legs along the Glenn Highway

The Glenn Highway National Scenic Byway (AK-1) follows the Matanuska River and passes the Matanuska Glacier, the largest glacier accessible by car in the United States. The Glacier is located at Mile 101, and is 27-miles long and four-miles wide. Matanuska Glacier Adventures offers guided glacier treks. 960 1280

Noppawat Tom Charoensinphon  

Whittier: Gateway to Prince William Sound

Whittier: Gateway to Prince William Sound

Whittier is a small community on Prince William Sound of about 200 people, most of whom live in a single 14-story, apartment-style building connected to the rest of the town via tunnels to avoid harsh winter weather. It connects to the Seward Highway (AK-1) via the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel that goes through Maynard Mountain and is the second-longest highway tunnel in North America at 13,300 feet long. Stan Stephens Glacier and Wildlife Cruises offers tours between Whittier and Valdez, where wildlife such as sea otters, seals and humpback whales are commonly seen in Prince William Sound. 960 1280

Daryl Pederson / Design Pics  

Prince William Sound

Prince William Sound

Named in 1778 to honor the son of Great Britian’s George III, Prince William Sound is rich in marine life and is the terminus of five glaciers. It is a popular sight-seeing destination from Whittier and Valdez, and is known for its sea otter and whale sightings. It was the site of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, and has since recovered. Kayak among sapphire iceburgs in Prince William Sound with Pangaea Adventures in Valdez. 960 1280

Kevin Miller  

Alaska's Little Switzerland: Valdez

Alaska's Little Switzerland: Valdez

Valdez is a commercial and sport-fishing port as well as the terminus of the Alaska Pipeline. Surrounded by snow-capped mountains, Valdez is called Alaska's "Little Switzerland." 960 1280

Steve Larese  

The Richardson Highway

The Richardson Highway

The Richardson Highway (AK-4) is a 368-mile-long stretch that connects Valdez to Fairbanks. The Richardson Highway passes many scenic stops such as the waterfalls of Keystone Canyon. This route makes a classic Alaska road trip, or leave the driving to John Hall's Alaska tours. 960 1280

Gary R. Johnson  

The Alaska Pipeline

The Alaska Pipeline

The Trans-Alaska Pipeline, commonly called the The Alaska Pipeline, was completed in 1977 and stretches 800 miles from Prudhoe Bay to Valdez. It can be seen along Richardson Highway from Fairbanks as it travels to the Valdez Marine Terminal. Information kiosks along the route give details about this massive engineering feat, such as how heat exchangers are used to keep the permafrost from melting underneath the pipeline. 960 1280

STEVELARESE  

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is America's largest national park and is filled with nine of the 16 highest peaks in North America, glaciers and miles of hiking trails through boreal forests. Its main visitor center is located off of the Richardson Highway (AK-4) between Copper Center and Glennallen. 960 1280

Steve Larese  

End of the Road: The Alaska Highway

End of the Road: The Alaska Highway

Completed in 1942 to aid the war effort during World War II, the Alaska Highway (also called the Alcan Highway) travels 1,387 miles from Dawson Creek in British Columbia, Canada, to Delta Junction, Alaska, where a monument marks its end point. Today it is a popular route for road trippers who pride themselves on completing the entire route through two nations. Alaska's segment of the Alaska Highay is also called the Richardson Highway (AK-4). 960 1280

Steve Larese  

Fairbanks: Gateway to the Arctic

Fairbanks: Gateway to the Arctic

Fairbanks is the northern extent of many Alaska road trips and is home to the Golden Heart Review at Pioneer Park, which explains Fairbanks' storied history through song and comedy. The Fountainhead Antique Cars Museum has an impressive collection of rare autos. The Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center explores Alaska's many indigenous cultures, as do the Chena Indian Village and the Alaska Native Heritage Center. 960 1280

Steve Larese  

It's a Dog's Life

It's a Dog's Life

Visitors are welcome at Trail Breaker Kennel along the Chena River in Fairbanks. Established in 1980 by David Monson and four-time Iditarod champion Susan Butcher, Trail Breaker Kennel breeds sled dogs and educates the public about the dogs and sport. Dog sledding is a popular and often necessary sport in Alaska, and the famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race takes place annually in March. 960 1280

STEVELARESE  

The George Parks Highway

The George Parks Highway

The George Parks Highway (AK-3) travels 361 miles from Anchorage to Fairbanks, and is the gateway to Denali National Park and Preserve. The Alaska Railroad parallels much of the highway. 960 1280

mcveras  

Denali National Park and Preserve

Denali National Park and Preserve

Grizzly and black bears, moose, wolves, caribou, Dall sheep and many other animals are seen within Denali National Park and Preserve’s six million acres. The 92-mile park road connects the park entrance to Kantishna, where remote lodges are located. Buses are the only public transportation permitted into Denali’s backcountry other than planes. Road trippers can park at the park’s main entrance and take a bus into the park. 960 1280

David Rasmus/Getty Images/iStockphoto  

Land of Lake–and Volcanoes

Land of Lake–and Volcanoes

Wonder Lake within Denali National Park is one of Alaska's 3 million lakes larger than twenty acres. At 586,400 square miles, Alaska is the largest state in the U.S. Alaska also has more than 12,000 rivers and 40 active volcanoes. 960 1280

STEVELARESE  

Denali: The High One

Denali: The High One

Denali, meaning "The High One" in the Koyukon Athabascan language, is the highest peak in North America at 20,310 feet. It can be seen from vantage points along AK-3 near Denali National Park. 960 1280

STEVELARESE  

Denali Backcountry Lodge, Kantishna

Denali Backcountry Lodge, Kantishna

Situated along Moose Creek within Denali National Park and Preserve, Denali Backcountry Lodge is 92 miles from the park's main entrance and reached only via a bus that takes guests through the park. Road trippers may park at Denali's main visitor center to catch a shuttle to the lodge. 960 1280

Steve Larese  

Alaska's Friendly Skies

Alaska's Friendly Skies

Alaska’s preferred method of transportation is airplanes, with many residents living in areas where there is no direct road access, if there’s any at all. The venerable Piper Cub is a popular plane, and is owned by many Alaskans in the same way as others would own a passenger car. Planes are often seen taking off and landing on waterways throughout Alaska, which uses its many rivers as roadways. 960 1280

STEVELARESE  

Flight Seeing in Talkeetna

Flight Seeing in Talkeetna

Road trippers can trade their car for an airplane in Talkeetna for a flightseeing tour of Denali National Park to the north. K2 Aviation takes passengers on scenic flights into the park, and can even land on glaciers for hiking. 960 1280

Steve Larese  

Roadside Beauty

Roadside Beauty

Throughout the summer wildflowers such as fireweed add color along Alaska's highways. 960 1280

Steve Larese  

Back to the Beginning: Anchorage

Back to the Beginning: Anchorage

Often the starting and ending point for Alaska road trips, Anchorage offers much to see and do itself. The Anchorage Museum details the history, cultures and art of Alaska. Local shops and restaurants such as 49th State Brewing Company make exploring Anchorage's charming downtown worthwhile. 960 1280

Steve Larese  

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

UT 12 winds through Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which protects 1.88-million acres of landscape containing unique Native American and geological sites, including petroglyphs, fossils and natural arches. With its quiet backroads, spectacular national parks and monuments, the large area called the Grand Circle that encompasses southern Utah and northern Arizona makes for one of the most memorable road trips in the United States. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

The Wave, Utah/Arizona border

The Wave, Utah/Arizona border

The Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness on the Utah/Arizona border near Kanab, Utah, requires a permit from the Bureau of Land Management and a difficult hike to reach. The payoff is remote, otherworldly scenery and the surreal swoop of sandstone called The Wave, formed by wind erosion. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Zion National Park, Utah

Zion National Park, Utah

Zion National Park, Utah's first national park, was created in 1909 and is renowned for its red cliffs, hidden gardens, waterfalls and emerald pools. It is a favorite destination for hikers worldwide. 960 1280

AndrewSoundarajan  

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park was established in 1928 and protects a colorful landscape of sandstone spires called hoodoos that were formed through eons of freeze-thaw erosion. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Capitol Reef National Park protects 378-square-miles of colorful landscape and historic human inhabitation, including ruins left by ancient Native Americans and Mormon settlers in the 1880s. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Fremont Petroglyphs, Utah

Fremont Petroglyphs, Utah

Located in Captial Reef National Park, these petroglyphs were left by the Fremont Culture some 2,000 years ago. Utah's striking landscapes and public lands contribute to Utah's $7.4 billion tourism industry. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Arches National Park, Moab, Utah

Arches National Park, Moab, Utah

Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, protects more than 2,000 natural stone arches, including Double Arch, pictured here. 960 1280

  

Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah

Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah

Natural Bridges National Monument protects natural arches (including the pictured Sipapu Bridge), Native American ruins and a lush riparian watershed. President Theodore Roosevelt declared the site a national monument in 1908. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Gooseneck State Park

Gooseneck State Park

Gooseneck State Park near Mexican Hat, Utah, is a popular photo and camping stop with eight first-come-first-serve sites. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Canyonlands National Park, Utah

One of Utah's "Might 5" national parks, Canyonlands National Park is a playground for outdoor adventurers. Mountain bikers, four-wheelers, hikers and backpackers explore these 337,598 acres of unique geology and Native American ruins. 960 1280

Jeremy Pawlowski  

Bears Ears National Monument, Utah

Bears Ears National Monument, Utah

Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, established by President Obama in 2016, protects hundreds of Native American archaeological sites. The area is still an important source of traditional resources and spiritual significance to several Native American tribes, including the Navajo Nation. Bears Ears National Monument encompasses Valley of the Gods. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Bluff, Utah

Bluff, Utah

Bluff, Utah, is a gateway to many of Utah's popular destinations including Bears Ears National Monument, and is home to the Twin Rocks Cafe, name for the towering rock formation behind it. Many areas in Utah are revered for their dark night skies, which are among darkest in North America. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Cow Canyon Trading Post, Bluff, Utah

Cow Canyon Trading Post, Bluff, Utah

This weathered 1949 Buick Super parked in front of Cow Canyon Trading Post in Bluff has become a must-stop photo attraction for road trippers. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

US 163 on the Utah/Arizona border

US 163 on the Utah/Arizona border

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park as seen driving south on US 163 from Utah into Arizona. The entrance to the park is on the Utah and Arizona border. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah/Arizona

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Utah/Arizona

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is called Tse'Bii'Ndzisgaii in the Diné language and means "Valley of the Rocks." This iconic 91,696-acre park has been featured in many movies and has come to symbolize the American West. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Antelope Canyon, Arizona

Antelope Canyon, Arizona

Antelope Canyon east of Page, Arizona, is a surreal labyrinth of slot canyons on Navajo tribal land. A Navajo guide is required to visit the site, and several tour operators are located in Page. It got its English name from the herd of pronghorn antelope that used to live in the area. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Horseshoe Bend, Arizona

Horseshoe Bend, Arizona

The Colorado River flows through Horseshoe Bend four miles south of Page, Arizona, accessed via a 3/4-mile-long trail on the west side of US 89. It is 1,000 feet from the canyon rim to the water. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Hopi Pueblo, Arizona

Hopi Pueblo, Arizona

Hopi dancer Kyle Chase of the Pollen Trail Dancers displays his talent throughout the Southwest, including at Grand Canyon National Park. Hopi Pueblo consists of three ancient villages east of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. The Hopi Cultural Center off of AZ 264 in Second Mesa details the history and culture of the tribe, and the tribally owned Moenkopi Legacy Inn & Suites near Tuba City makes a good road trip rest stop. 960 1280

  

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

Cameron Trading Post, Arizona

A Navajo master weaver demonstrate her skill in the Cameron Trading Post weaving room. Cameron Trading Post, located 30 minutes from the Grand Canyon's East Entrance on AZ 64, is a trading post, restaurant and hotel that was built in 1916. 960 1280

STEVE LARESE  

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Grand Canyon National Park is 277 miles long and 18 miles across at its widest point between the north and south rims, and one mile at its deepest. It was established in 1919 by President Theodore Roosevelt, who said of it: "The Grand Canyon fills me with awe. It is beyond comparison–beyond description; absolutely unparalleled throughout the wide world...Let this great wonder of nature remain as it now is. Do nothing to mar its grandeur, sublimity and loveliness. You cannot improve on it. But what you can do is to keep it for your children, your children's children, and all who come after you, as the one great sight which every American should see." 960 1280

Steve Larese   

Glacier National Park, Montana to Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Glacier National Park, Montana to Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Start in Whitefish, a delightful ski town, before taking the impossibly scenic Going-to-the-Sun Road into Glacier National Park. Camp overnight or opt for the one-of-a-kind Sperry Chalet. (As long as you’re up for a 6.7-mile uphill hike and no hot water or showers.) The next day, stop for lunch in East Glacier Park village, then hop on 287 South for the state capital of Helena. Tuck into lunch at Steve’s Café, then continue south toward Bozeman and the Museum of the Rockies. A half hour south you’ll hit charming Livingston and its Old West vibe. Try Montana’s Rib & Chop House or Mark’s In & Out diner. Turn south toward Yellowstone and check into the all-inclusive Mountain Sky Guest Ranch. From here it’s on to Yellowstone. Take in Mount Washburn, the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone, Old Faithful and Mammoth Hot Springs (stick to the boardwalks; you can’t soak in these springs.) Make camp here before continuing on to Grand Teton National Park. Overnight at Dornans before concluding in Jackson Hole. Leave time to take in this posh ski resort, and recap your trip over dinner at Lotus or Rendezvous Bistro. 960 1280

kwiktor  

Chicago to Mackinac Island, Michigan

Chicago to Mackinac Island, Michigan

Mackinac Island feels stuck in the 19th century, but in a good way. From Chi-town, stick to Michigan’s Gold Coast, where you’ll find rolling hills, farm stands, sand dunes and vineyards. After crossing into Michigan, stop for lunch at Charlie's Piggin N' Grinnin' (the name alone) in Benton Harbor. Sated, keep chugging toward Holland, best known for its tulips. (This year’s Tulip Time Festival is May 6-14.) Visit Windmill Island Gardens, the Big Red Lighthouse and New Holland Brewing, then rest at Lake Ranch Resort. From here, Traverse City and its food scene beckons. Since the area’s known for tart cherries, stock up at Cherry Republic. Elsewhere, consider Cousin Jenny's Cornish Pasties and the food trucks at Little Fleet. Next, pull off an hour north in picturesque Charlevoix before overnighting in Mackinaw City, the gateway to Mackinac Island via a 20-minute ferry ride. You’ll have to leave your car at the ferry lot since Mackinac Island is car-free, but between bikes, electric scooters and horse-drawn carriages, you’ll hardly miss it. 960 1280

catnap72  

Blue Ridge Parkway from Virginia to North Carolina

Blue Ridge Parkway from Virginia to North Carolina

The Blue Ridge Parkway connects the National Parks of Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains, but it’s more than that. Thanks to 469 miles of spectacular scenery and clearly marked places to stop along the way, it’s made for road tripping. Start at the beginning of the route in Shenandoah National Park; Skyline Drive sets the tone. Stop for a stretch at the James River Visitor Center, then continue to the Peaks of Otter. Consider staying at the Peaks of Otter Lodge (it’s the only one on the Parkway open year-round). Hike to a pioneer cabin from the Smart View Picnic Area. Continue a short ways to the early 20th-century Mabry Mill and eat a hearty country lunch at the eponymous restaurant. As you cross into North Carolina, Moses H. Cone Memorial Park is popular for its Gilded Age estate. Take photos as the iconic Linn Cove Viaduct wends through the treetops, then pull off for Linville Falls, the Museum of North Carolina Minerals, Little Switzerland and the Folk Art Center. Take a slight detour into Asheville, then visit Biltmore Estate; spend the night in town. Back on the parkway, fit in Mt. Pisgah and Waterrock Knob before reaching the end of the line. 960 1280

WerksMedia  

Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco to Portland

Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco to Portland

Head north over the Golden Gate Bridge to experience the less crowded portion of the Pacific Coast Highway. Arrive early to Muir Woods to walk among the towering redwoods, stop to hike in Point Reyes National Seashore, then eat all the cheese at Cowgirl Creamery. Pull off in Bodega Bay for the views, then continue on to Mendocino and check into Sea Rock Inn. Dine at Trillium Café before settling in for the night. After breakfast, drive to Glass Beach near Fort Bragg to look for said sea glass. Redwood National and State Parks are next; pick a scenic drive and consider camping overnight. Keep heading up the coast to Prehistoric Gardens, an offbeat attraction with life-size dinosaurs (not to be confused with Jurassic Park). Grab a bite at Shark Bites Cafe in Coos Bay, then stay at Heceta Head Lighthouse or the Whale Cove Inn in Depoe Bay. Either way, go whale watching in Depoe Bay since it's considered Oregon’s whale-watching capital. Before turning off for Portland, it’s worth popping into Tillamook Cheese Factory for not just its cheese, but its two-dozen ice cream flavors. 960 1280

Morey Milbradt  

New York City to Portland, Maine

New York City to Portland, Maine

Once you clear New York and lower Connecticut congestion, I-95 passes near picturesque coastal towns that become progressively more laid back. Drive past Greenwich, Stamford and Bridgeport before stopping in New Haven, home of Yale University. Tour the campus, then feast on pizza at Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana. Continue to Mystic, Connecticut, made famous by the movie, before pulling into Newport, Rhode Island for a night or two at The Chanler at Cliff Walk. The following day, tour the Gilded Age summer homes, including The Breakers. Bypass Boston traffic for Newburyport, Massachusetts. Its cobblestone streets, charming shops and walkable downtown make it a worthy stop. Foodies shouldn’t pass Portsmouth, New Hampshire; dozens of options range from Portsmouth Brewery to The Friendly Toast. Cap off the day at the Captain Lord Mansion in Kennebunkport. Set out next for Portland Head Light, a historic lighthouse, before finally reaching Portland, Maine. Rejoice with celebratory oysters at Eventide Oyster Co. 960 1280

KenWiedemann  

Highway 61 (Blues Highway) from New Orleans to Nashville, Tennessee

Highway 61 (Blues Highway) from New Orleans to Nashville, Tennessee

Highway 61, also called the Blues Highway, is a historic stretch immortalized in song. It actually runs all the way to Chicago, but break it up to avoid pulling an Amazing Race. Start in New Orleans, and soak up jazz at Preservation Hall and The Spotted Cat Music Club. Venture into the Mississippi Delta and set out for Vicksburg; brush up on American history at Vicksburg National Military Park. Overnight here before making your way toward Clarksdale, Mississippi, considered the birthplace of the blues, but not before stopping for a thick milkshake at Chuck’s Dairy Bar in Rolling Fork, and visiting the Highway 61 Blues Museum in Leland. In Clarksdale, hit up Cat Head Delta Blues and Folk Art for all kinds of blues music. Catch live music at Ground Zero Blues Club, co-owned by Morgan Freeman, and Red's Lounge. If possible, time your trip for the Juke Joint Festival in April. Eat at Abe's Bar-B-Q, and experience sharecropper shacks by staying at the Shack Up Inn. Continue to Memphis for the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Rum Boogie Café, Graceland and Central BBQ. Spend the rest of the trip in Nashville, where music highlights include the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Johnny Cash Museum, Robert’s Western World, Grimey’s New and Preloved Music, and of course, the Grand Ole Opry. 960 1280

Dosfotos  

San Juan Skyway, Colorado

San Juan Skyway, Colorado

This 236-mile route passes through former mining towns in the San Juan Mountains, and is best done in summer when mountain roads are clear. Start in Ouray: Dubbed the Switzerland of Colorado, it also boasts five hot springs. Relax in the vapor cave at the Wiesbaden Hot Springs Spa & Lodgings; Ouray Hot Springs Pool will reopen to the public following a multimillion-dollar renovation. Navigating the Million Dollar Highway between Ouray and Silverton takes skill, since it involves numerous switchbacks and few guardrails, but you get breathtaking scenery in exchange. Once in Silverton, take the One Hundred Gold Mine Tour. Next up in Durango, channel Harry Potter by riding the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, which is still steam powered. Grab a drink afterward at Steamworks Brewing Company. Rest at the historic Strater Hotel before striking out for Mesa Verde National Park, best known for its 600 ancient Pueblo cliff dwellings. Branch off and conclude in Telluride, one of the top spots in the country for skiing, but a must year-round. It’s also great for food, from Brown Dog Pizza to Allred’s Restaurant). Splurge and recharge at Lumière Telluride before heading home. 960 1280

RoschetzkyIstockPhoto  

Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco to Los Angeles

Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco to Los Angeles

Miles of mountains and wild shoreline await on this part of the Pacific Coast Highway. Cruise along until reaching Santa Cruz and its boardwalk. After, drive another hour to Monterrey for the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Quaint Carmel-by-the-Sea is just a few minutes away; rest near the ocean at La Playa Carmel. From here you’ll encounter some of the best views of your life from the Bixby Creek Bridge. Continue to Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park, or consider a mini-retreat at the nearby Esalen Institute. From here it’s on to Hearst Castle in San Simeon; don’t miss the elephant seals nearby. Further south, poke around town in Cayucos and hit up Brown Butter Cookie Company. San Luis Obispo is a short drive away; stay at the iconic Madonna Inn and explore this charming college town, including Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa and Bubblegum Alley. Pismo Beach is en route to Santa Barbara, a fantastic beach town. Overnight at the latter before setting out for Malibu, and then wrapping at the famed Santa Monica Pier. 960 1280

photo by Chris Axe  

Big Island, Hawaii

Big Island, Hawaii

Unlike other Hawaiian islands, the Big Island offers everything from white- and black-sand beaches to active volcanoes. Start in Kailua-Kona, a great base for its beaches and shopping. Visit the historic Kailua Village, feast on fresh fish at Da Poke Shack, then head north to Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park. Continue along the black-sand beaches of the Kohala Coast to Mauna Kea Beach Hotel. Follow the coast to the beautiful Pololu Valley for hiking and more black-sand beaches. From here, turn inland along the scenic Kohala Mountain Road to the lush green hills of Waimea, where you can experience working ranches and go horseback riding. After, it’s a short drive to the flagship of acclaimed Merriman’s. Overnight in Waimea, then continue along the Hamakua Coast to Akaka Falls State Park. Spend a couple days in Hilo at The Palm Cliffs House Inn; wander downtown, visit Liliuokalani Gardens and shop at the farmer’s market. Set out for Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, then circle around the southern coast until reaching Kona Coffee Living History Farm. Back in Kailua-Kona, stuff yourself with malasadas (filled doughnuts) at Holy Donuts. 960 1280

P_Wei  

Route 66 from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Los Angeles

Route 66 from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Los Angeles

Route 66 stretches all the way to Chicago, but highlights in this section include curious roadside attractions, classic motels and all the kitsch you could want. After exploring Route 66 attractions in Albuquerque, strike out for Acoma Pueblo to learn about Native American traditions. Stop in Gallup, New Mexico to rest at El Rancho Hotel. You’ll soon cross into Arizona, the longest stretch of Route 66. Hike in Petrified Forest National Park and check out the Painted Desert Inn museum. Chow down at Joe and Aggie's Cafe in Holbrook, then check into the Wigwam Motel. (Yes, rooms are in wigwams.) Rested, keep on toward Flagstaff, then hit Seligman for Delgadillo’s Snow Cap Drive-In before spending the night at El Trovatore Motel. Continue to the former gold mining town of Oatman, where wild burros roam the streets. Pull off at the Mojave National Preserve, then stop at the preserved Roy's Motel and Café in Amboy, California. Eat up at Emma Jean's Holland Burger Café in Victorville, but save room for an egg cream at Fair Oaks Pharmacy and Soda Fountain in Pasadena. Celebrate your trip at the Santa Monica Pier, the literal end of the road for Route 66. 960 1280

Lady-Photo  

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