21 Genius Upcycled Packing Hacks

Save money and suitcase space by repurposing common items around the house.
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Video: Dollar Store Packing Hacks

Pack smart and save money with these clever travel tips.

Most Popular Travel Hacks

Save Money by Bringing Your Own Wine

Save Money by Bringing Your Own Wine

Sherry Kennedy, founder of Cruise Maven, says some lines will allow a bottle or two in your cabin, but be sure to check the cruise line’s alcohol policy in advance. Most lines only allow it during embarkation day. Also, don’t forget to bring a bottle opener, or choose wine with a twist-off top to avoid paying a corkage fee.

Conversely, Kennedy says the least expensive wine package can be worth it, especially “if you don’t want to spend the $20 corkage fee on a $10 bottle of wine.” Even better, the waiter can save any leftover wine by noting your name and room number, and you can enjoy it at another meal at any of the ship’s dining venues. 
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Don’t Feel Obligated to Book a Shore Excursion Through the Ship

Don’t Feel Obligated to Book a Shore Excursion Through the Ship

Experts agree that independent operators are often cheaper and can provide a more in-depth experience. Stewart Chiron, founder of The Cruise Guy, even advises leaving the ship for a night in order to experience a city. For example, on a Mediterranean cruise, he advises getting off in Livorno in order to spend a full day and night in Florence. From there, one can take a train to Rome to catch up with the ship. “It saves an hour and a half return from Florence,” he says. Of course, book the hotel in advance.

Carolyn Spencer Brown, the editor in chief of Cruise Critic, also suggests connecting with other passengers beforehand in order to save money on an independent tour. Her site offers a section called Roll Call, which allows passengers who have already booked a cruise to chat up to a year before the sailing. Doing so facilitates finding others to share excursions, like chartering a catamaran from St. Thomas to St. John. “I think those experiences tend to be more special than getting on a catamaran with 50 people you don’t know,” she says.
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Anna Bryukhanova  

Avoid Paying High Rates to Connect to the Internet

Avoid Paying High Rates to Connect to the Internet

In order to avoid spending 75 cents a minute to get online, Kennedy suggests buying a package to save money. For example, Carnival offers a social media package (which includes access to Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and more) for just $5/day. While in port, she recommends asking (or following) crew members to find the best Internet cafes. 960 1280

  

Ask for Ginger if You Feel Seasick

Ask for Ginger if You Feel Seasick

The odds of getting seasick on a large cruise ship are low, but it's good to be prepared just in case. Ginger has long been used as a natural remedy to treat nausea and motion sickness. Kennedy says that many ships, including Norwegian, Holland America and Princess, will provide it for free in their restaurants. (Although some ships will charge you.) Luckily candied ginger and gum are also easy to find at many supermarkets if you'd rather bring it with you.

If you suspect you might need something stronger, consider bringing Bonine, Dramamine or motion sickness patches to avoid paying higher prices at the infirmary. 
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Compare Rates Through a Travel Agent

Compare Rates Through a Travel Agent

Chiron notes that agents can score upgrades that would otherwise cost thousands of dollars. He says they can also help select the best cabin location, such as a quiet room in the forward of the ship instead of below the pool deck. Kennedy adds that agents often have access to discounts and perks that cruise line reservations don’t know about, such as onboard credits, a free bottle of wine or bathrobes, and even complimentary dining in a specialty restaurant.   960 1280

Yuri Arcurs  

Book Reservations in Advance

Book Reservations in Advance

Both Spencer Brown and Chiron recommend doing this in order to guarantee a spot. Online scheduling is available for spa appointments, entertainment options, restaurants and shore excursions. 960 1280

  

Visit the Spa on a Port Day

Visit the Spa on a Port Day

Since the ship will be emptier, Spencer Brown and Kennedy note that you’re more likely to find a deal. Kennedy advises checking the daily planner for specials. Just avoid succumbing to any product pitches, says Spencer Brown. 960 1280

Yuri Arcurs  

Do Your Laundry for a Flat Rate

Do Your Laundry for a Flat Rate

Kennedy says that most lines offer a flat rate for doing laundry toward the end of a cruise — think as much dirty laundry as you can stuff in the bag provided. However, if you need to do laundry sooner, both Holland America and Cunard offer free self-service laundry machines and detergent.  960 1280

  

Wait Until the Last Day of a Cruise to Shop

Wait Until the Last Day of a Cruise to Shop

Kennedy says this is when you get the best shopping deals onboard a ship, especially if it's at the end of a season. For example, on a past cruise she bought sweatshirts that were reduced from $59 to $7. 960 1280

Sabine Lubenow  

Book Your Next Cruise Before Leaving the Ship

Book Your Next Cruise Before Leaving the Ship

Kennedy says this is another great way to save money. For example, Cunard will provide up to $300 in onboard credit to spend on your next cruise. Don’t forget to ask about any available promotions at the time of booking. 960 1280

  

Choose a Honeymoon Registry

Choose a Honeymoon Registry

Don’t just focus on wedding gift registries. Kristen Maxwell Cooper, deputy editor of The Knot, recommends registering with a site such as Traveler’s Joy, which allows guests to purchase everything from a romantic dinner on the beach to surf lessons.

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Pack a Carry-On

Pack a Carry-On

Nothing is more stressful than losing your luggage and having nothing to wear,” says Maxwell Cooper. She advises packing at least a swimsuit, cover-up, nice sandals and toiletries.

Keija Minor, the editor in chief of Brides, also recommends tossing in a change of clothes. And don’t leave packing for the last minute, especially if you’re leaving right after the wedding. “It’s unrealistic, especially if you still have friends and family in town.”  
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scyther5  

Consider Your Travel Style

Consider Your Travel Style

For example, not everyone wants to spend a week at the beach. “Don’t plan it according to the classic stereotype of what a honeymoon should be,” says Tom Marchant, cofounder of Black Tomato, a high-end travel agency.


Minor notices more active honeymoons have become popular, especially among millennials. However, “Know yourself. This should be a bucket list trip, but in line with the type of vacation you like to have,” she says. All the experts agree that a balanced mix is key, since too few activities can lead to boredom, while too many can lead to exhaustion. 

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Link Your Credit Card to a Rewards Program

Link Your Credit Card to a Rewards Program

In order to save money, Minor advises connecting your credit card to a hotel or frequent flier program as soon as you get engaged. For example, American Express offers travel benefits to its Gold and Platinum members that range from a $75 hotel credit to a free room upgrade. 960 1280

bernie_moto  

Travel During Shoulder Season

Travel During Shoulder Season

All of the experts recommend traveling during this period in order to get the best deals. For example, Marchant notes that the Maldives become more affordable after the high season ends, yet the weather is still good. Minor points out that more room availability equals a greater chance for getting upgraded—but don’t wait until check-in to ask.  960 1280

  

Don’t be Afraid to Tell People You’re on a Honeymoon

Don’t be Afraid to Tell People You’re on a Honeymoon

It may sound obvious, but extra perks await those who ask. Minor recommends calling your hotel ahead of time to inquire about romantic or VIP experiences, such as a picnic on the beach, since many places offer them even though they don’t advertise them on their site. On the other hand, waiting until arrival can still net romantic results. For example, this writer can personally attest to a soaking tub filled with rose petals and an entire chocolate cake delivered to her room at the Park Hyatt in Goa, India. 960 1280

ruidoblanco  

Don’t Forget Your Wedding Dress

Don’t Forget Your Wedding Dress

This only applies to destination weddings, but Minor says brides tend to overlook this aspect. She says to figure out who is taking the dress home for you so you don’t have to pack it in your luggage, or worse, forget it. 960 1280

Shestock  

Consider Leaving Your Ring at Home

Consider Leaving Your Ring at Home

Of course you want to show off your bling on your honeymoon, but Minor says to reconsider depending on the ring and the destination. “If it’s not insured, don’t travel with it. Period.” Besides the risk of it getting lost or stolen, there are other considerations, such as sand becoming lodged between the prongs and stone during a beach vacation.  960 1280

  

Factor in Flight Time

Factor in Flight Time

“We hear from couples a lot that they chose a destination that was too far away,” says Maxwell Cooper. Since weddings can be exhausting, she cautions against a long flight, or connecting flights, too soon after the wedding. 

Jet lag is another consideration, since it can take at least several days to adjust to another time zone.
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Don’t Leave for Your Honeymoon Too Soon

Don’t Leave for Your Honeymoon Too Soon

Minor lists this as the number one mistake that couples make. “Don’t think you have to leave immediately after the wedding,” she says. Fewer couples are doing this for a variety of reasons, such as time and money. Instead, consider taking a minimoon shortly after, and saving the full honeymoon for when you do have more time and can get the best deal—even if it means waiting a few months. 960 1280

Rob Melnychuk  

New Star Wars Nighttime Spectacular Coming to Disney's
You Snooze, You Lose

You Snooze, You Lose

Plan your visit to the park so that you arrive a few minutes before the gates swing open. You’ll zip through lines for the major rides. You can further reduce wait times by immediately heading to the back of the park where crowds will be thinnest. 960 1280

  

Stay Hydrated for Free

Stay Hydrated for Free

Don't spend $5 for a bottle of water again. Most theme parks, like Walt Disney World, will give you a cup of water for free at any food service counter. Pack a lightweight water bottle and refill at no cost.  960 1280

Move Collective LLC  

BYOL

BYOL

Save money by bringing your own lunch and snacks. You can rent a locker to store a small cooler or lunchbox. This is a great tip for families with members with allergies and special dieterary needs.  960 1280

  

Take Advantage of Free Fast Passes

Take Advantage of Free Fast Passes

With any park admission, Walt Disney World and Disneyland offer free FastPass+ tickets that allow you to skip the lines and schedule exactly when you want to ride the park’s most popular attractions. Most park visiters grab a ticket for these once in the park but, you can actually reserve these 30 days before you set foot in the park and 60 if you’re staying at one of the park resorts. This perk is limited to three rides a day so we recommend the using your passes on the three mountains in Magic Kingdom: Space Mountain, Splash Mountain and Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. 960 1280

Garth Vaughan  

Don't Let Rain Spoil Your Trip

Don't Let Rain Spoil Your Trip

If you're visiting any of the major parks in Orlando, be prepared for afternoon showers no matter the season. A lot of visitors leave during this time but any Florida native knows that in half an hour the sun will be back. Keep a poncho on hand and use the time to shop, get a snack or visit popular characters indoors. 960 1280

  

Follow Parks on Social Media

Follow Parks on Social Media

Follow your favorite theme parks on Instagram and Facebook, and subscribe to their newsletters so you don’t miss out on flash sales like discounted tickets and deals on dining and park hotels. Social media fans are also the first to know about new attractions and shows like Walt Disney World's new Star Wars additions.  960 1280

DISNEY/LUCASFILM  

Learn From the Super Fans

Learn From the Super Fans

Plan your trip based on tips and reviews from other park fans on community websites like Theme Park Review or Ultimate Roller Coaster and vacation planning blogs like Orlando Informer and Theme Park Insider. Listen to WDW Radio or one of the many amusement park-themed podcasts for advice on best times to visit the parks and can't-miss events like Harry Potter fan weekends at Universal Studios. 960 1280

© 2013 Universal Orlando Resort  

Download Park Apps

Download Park Apps

Apps like My Disney Experience feature interactive maps, wait times for rides, online dining reservations, show times, sharing options via Instagram, etc. and that crucial GPS bathroom locator. 960 1280

Photographer: Leonardo Patrizi  

Buy in Advance

Buy in Advance

You’re much better off buying theme park tickets in advance than by burning park time waiting in lines at the entrance. Pre-purchasing can also give you access to discount codes and seasonal specials. While it may be tempting, never buy tickets from sellers on Craigslist or eBay. There’s nothing worse than explaining the concept of “counterfeit” to your six-year-old.  960 1280

© 2013 Universal Orlando Resort  

Best Deals for Souvenirs

Best Deals for Souvenirs

You're going to pay top dollar at shops inside the parks, especially items like stuffed animals and T-shirts. Opt for outlet stores outside the park like Disney Springs in Orlando. You can also order souveniers from many major theme parks online to skip the hassle of hauling items around the park all day. 960 1280

Bloomberg  

haveseen / Getty Images
Put a Cork in It

Put a Cork in It

Leave your key ring at home and take just your house, condo or car key to the shore. Tip: Screw an eyehook into an old wine cork and attach the crucial key to it. If you accidentally take it into the surf, you’ll have a buoy and a good story instead of a locksmith referral. 960 1280

  

The Right Fit

The Right Fit

Traditional beach blankets have a habit of mutating into mainsails during an onshore gust. Instead, take an old bed sheet (fitted is best) and fill the corners with sand to keep it on the ground where it belongs. If the local municipality permits, further stabilize your foundation with an iced bucket of beer or bubbly. 960 1280

  

Sound the UV Alarm

Sound the UV Alarm

It’s easy to lose track of time at the beach, but you need to stay alert to avoid getting sunburn. Set the timer on your phone or, for a more stylish setup, score a cute alarm clock at the thrift store (or a modern knock-off) and set it for a wake-up call. Your dermatologist will thank you.  960 1280

www.natasha-lebedinskaya.com  

BYOPopsicles

BYOPopsicles

Make your own frosted treats for the kids by tossing a few reusable juice pouches or store-bought juice boxes into the freezer the night before your beach trip. Mom can add a dash of rum to hers (just make sure to clearly mark the adult version).  960 1280

Sing&Tom  

Powder Up

Powder Up

If you hate having sand stick to your skin, try this trick to remove it. Dust baby powder over the sandy area, then easily shake or brush off the sand. The powder draws out moisture, making it a must for your beach bag.  960 1280

  

Wrap It Up

Wrap It Up

If you’ve ever dropped your phone in the toilet, you know that tech and water don’t mix. Now imagine that toilet is the Pacific Ocean. Protect your expensive phone or tablet by putting it in a 10-cent zip-top bag. It’ll also keep sand out of your charging port.  960 1280

  

A Spot of Tea

A Spot of Tea

If you forgot the sunscreen and wound up scorched, Earl Grey can help. Black tea contains tannic acid, which is one of the most effective ways to treat sunburn. Brew a few cups of strong tea, let cool and apply with cotton balls, or just apply the teabag directly to the affected area.  960 1280

  

Float On

Float On

Upcycle your old pool toys for your day at the beach. Fill a floatie with water, toss it in the freezer overnight and you’ve got an ice-cold drink insulator. When you’ve finished your drink, revert your drink insulator back to its original use as a floatie.  960 1280

  

Thomas Barwick/ Taxi/ Getty Images
Make a Plan

Make a Plan

You can still be spontaneous, but making an itinerary will help you budget your time. Keep in mind, too, that a lot of small town mom and pop businesses don't keep traditional hours; call ahead to make sure the anticipated stops on your visit are open. Share your travel plans (but for safety's sake, not the dates of travel, be general about when and how you are traveling) with your social media outlets to get suggestions of under-the-radar places you won't find in the guide books.  960 1280

Chutima chaochaiya  

My Blue Highway

My Blue Highway

If you’re going to road trip take the blue roads, the tiny highways that connect us with true American culture. For example, Howard Finster’s Paradise Gardens is located 30 minutes off of I-75 in Summerville, Ga., which you’ll miss if you stick to the freeway with its outlet malls and chain restaurants. Small towns are rich with local art, tall tales and home cooking, the places where unique memories are made.

Photo: Flickr, J. Stephen Conn, Creative Commons

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Be Safe

Be Safe

Pack a first aid kit. You probably have a lot of the items already in your medicine cabinet, but you’ll want to pack smaller quantities. We like Resqme’s prepareme all-in-one preparedness kits that’ll not only take care of scraped knee, but also comes with a window-smashing and seatbelt cutting device. For advice on making your own car safety kit, watch this DIY Network video. 960 1280

  

Keep it Clean

Keep it Clean

A clean and organized car won’t get you there faster, but you will be happier. Line cup holders with silicone baking cups to catch crumbs and spills. A clothespin doused in a few drops of fragrance attached to your vent makes an instant air freshener.  960 1280

Ramil Gibadullin  

Puppy on Board

Puppy on Board

Many of us choose regular unleaded over jet fuel so we can vacation with our four-legged friends. But your pet needs access to food and water, proper walks and ventilation. In hot weather, never, ever leave your pet in the car. Some open-air malls and many Home Depots are dog friendly. Pre-measure food and store in Ziploc bags and keep a collapsible water bowl in the car at all times. Ruffwear offers a wide selection of items with the doggie-centric traveler in mind including this reusable food tote that is easily flattened. 

 

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Steve Tague  

Eat Healthy

Eat Healthy

Sure there are greasy spoons and convenience stores at almost every freeway exit, but loading up on foods you don't regularly eat can cause severe stomach upset meaning more public restroom pit stops. Pack healthy snacks that are dry and easy to hold in plastic containers before the trip. Astronauts (really) swear by 100%FOOD from Space Nutrients Station. Mixed with water, milk or juice, one bottle packs more daily goodness than a vegetable plate and fewer calories than those tempting Krispy Kremes. 960 1280

  

Stay Juiced

Stay Juiced

Sure you’ve got a car charger, maybe even one with a splitter, but we’re betting that something else loses its juice along the way. Invest in a gadget that harnesses the sun to charge your devices like the WakaWaka or rechargeable batteries that have less of a chance of going in the landfill. 960 1280

  

Necessities on Top

Necessities on Top

Pack your essentials, like toiletries and one quick clothing change, in a dedicated and waterproof tote that’s easy to grab. Spills, wardrobe malfunctions, general griminess and makeup disasters can be quickly remedied if every family member keeps their own easily accessed clean-up kit on hand.

 

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Organize the Boot

Organize the Boot

Pack heavier items, like coolers, at the bottom of your trunk. Make sure that essentials and emergency equipment is easy to reach and that everything has a dedicated case. That way should you have a flat while on the road everything is easily removed.  960 1280

  

Keep Organized

Keep Organized

A toiletries organizer hung on the back of a seat creates an instant catchall for stowing loose items that often get dropped between the seats. Take a photograph to keep on your smartphone for a quick and easy reference. Retake once an item is depleted and you've got an instant shopping list at your fingertips.  960 1280

  

Women Biking
Go Biking

Go Biking

Reduce your carbon footprint and participate in Earth-friendly transportation options like biking, walking and taking public transit. These alternatives are often cheaper than taking a cab or renting a car. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Reusable Bottles

Reusable Bottles

A plastic bottle often travels thousands of miles before you buy it, so carry a reusable container or drink locally sourced water when you’re on the go. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Non-Stop Flights

Non-Stop Flights

Book non-stop flights whenever possible. A significant percentage of a plane’s carbon emissions come from takeoff and landing. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Buy Local

Buy Local

When and wherever you travel, buy local products whenever possible instead of buying products that have been flown or shipped in from overseas. However, do not buy souvenirs or other products made from endangered animals or plants. In most cases, you can't get them through customs anyway. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Working Farms

Working Farms

Stay at working farm that also functions as inn. This unique experience helps travelers connect with an area’s agricultural heritage -- and they cost less than hotels. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Recycle Trash

Recycle Trash

Staying at a hotel? Make sure you ask about the hotel’s recycling program, and sort your trash accordingly. If your hotel doesn't recycle, consider taking your empty bottles or other items home and recycle them there. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Hike Marked Trails

Hike Marked Trails

Don’t veer off marked trails when hiking, and maintain a safe distance from any animals you encounter. Deposit your trash in marked receptacles or take it with you when you leave. Light campfires only in areas where permitted and be sure they're completely extinguished before you leave. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Rent Hybrid Car

Rent Hybrid Car

Choose the smallest vehicle or a hybrid when renting a car for travel. Decline any "free" upgrades that can cost you more in gas. Consider renting an economy car if your personal vehicle is a large, gas guzzler. You'll save gas and avoid putting miles on your own vehicle. 960 1280

Robert Scoble, flickr  

Stay at Green Hotel

Stay at Green Hotel

Las Vegas is actually at the forefront of green building, and the Palazzo Hotel Vegas is one of the largest hotels in the U.S. to receive LEED certification (along with the huge Aria and Vdara City Center hotels). Ninety-five percent of the building's structural steel and 26 percent of its concrete is recycled material. The swimming pools are heated by solar power, and the hotel claims to save enough energy annually to light a 100-watt light bulb for 12,100 years. 960 1280

Oyster.com  

Eat Local

Eat Local

Eating locally is one of the best ways to support a community. Try to shop at farmers’ markets and dine at restaurants with locally sourced ingredients. 960 1280

William Murphy, flickr  

Fly Like a Pro

Woman applying make up while on an airplane
Use a Scarf

Use a Scarf

Tie your hair in a scarf to combat bad hair at the end of a long flight -- make it a Hermes to add extra glamour. 960 1280

Chris Leschinsky/Getty Images  

Hair Powder

Hair Powder

Hair powder, like a dry shampoo, helps combat oily scalp or limp hair. 960 1280

LiudmylaSupynska/Getty Images  

Leave-in Conditioner

Leave-in Conditioner

Leave your house with a leave-in conditioner in your hair. Wrap it in a scarf, and you'll get a deep-conditioning treatment while you earn the miles -- excellent for combating the overly dry air on board 960 1280

iStock/jfmdesign  

Bring a Hairbrush

Bring a Hairbrush

As always, carry a great hairbrush. Edriss and Landy like the junior Maison & Pearson. 960 1280
Hair Shine Paper

Hair Shine Paper

Don't forget hair shine paper. It helps eliminate static and reduce dullness. 960 1280

iStock/suksao999  

Cucumber Eye Pads

Cucumber Eye Pads

Cucumber eye pads. Pre-moistened pads soothe and refresh tired and puffy eyes. These can also be refrigerated prior to travel to further refresh eyes during flight. 960 1280
Makeup Remover Cloths

Makeup Remover Cloths

Pre-moistened makeup remover cloths remove makeup or just clean the skin mid- or post-travel. Neutrogena or Mac brands are good. (Note: These pre-moistened towelettes must be placed in your one-quart bag of liquids.) 960 1280

KatarzynaBialasiewicz/Getty Images  

Makeup Corrector Stick

Makeup Corrector Stick

Makeup corrector sticks help correct little smudges, blotches or "I-can't sleep-because-I'm-stuck-in-the-center-aisle" circles under the eyes. 960 1280
Cake Mascara

Cake Mascara

Cake mascara is a great alternative when liquids are not allowed. This is the classic Hollywood way to darken and define the eyelashes. It comes in a pressed, cake form and can be mixed with water then applied with a firm brush. They recommend curling the lashes first -- Paula Dorf or Longcils Boncza brands are favorites. 960 1280

iStock/deniztuyel  

Solid Cocoa Butter

Solid Cocoa Butter

Solid cocoa butter and cotton gloves for a hand treatment (also place in one quart travel bag). 960 1280

bluehill75/Getty Images  

The Go Sleep Travel System Keeps You Comfortable and Upright Throughout Your Flight
Sleep Tight

Sleep Tight

Many people suffer anxiety while flying, leaving them exhausted upon arrival. Mosaic Weighted Blankets offers a refreshingly low-tech solution. Weighted blankets simulate the effect of a reassuring hug, which increases serotonin, producing a calming, sleepy feeling, as if you were napping under Grammy's homemade quilt. 960 1280

Izabela Habur, iStock  

Relaxation 30,000 Feet in the Air

Relaxation 30,000 Feet in the Air

There are ways to do yoga on a plane that do not end with an air marshal and handcuffs. Yogi Ramesh Padala has devised YogaTailor a personalized yoga and meditation guide with suggestions for air travellers by which he swears. Teri Meissner teaches the Japanese practice of Jin Shin Jyutsu, a touch-based relaxation technique that can be applied even within the confines of an airplane seat.   960 1280

Genaro Melendrez-Diaz fotografo, iStock  

Tune In, Drop Off With Me

Tune In, Drop Off With Me

If you find it impossible to tune out the carnival in your brain prior to an early flight, the DreamScience Brainwave Oriented Sleep Companion is your own personal off switch. 20 nature-themed soundscapes and hypnotic mood lighting will drop you into a blissful dream that the gradual wake setting will lift you out of in time to make your connecting flight.  960 1280

DreamScience  

Fasten Your Head Belts

Fasten Your Head Belts

The only thing worse than not being able to sleep on a plane is being too good at it.  The GoSleep Travel System is a car seat for your nodding noodle. It combines a memory foam neck pillow with a sleep mask that wraps around the seatback keeping you in the upright, locked position for the entire flight. We love the cool retro-aero designs.  960 1280

GoSleep  

You're Getting Sleepy

You're Getting Sleepy

Four out of 5 scientists agree that listening to the windbag next to you doubles flight time. SleepPhones are headphones in a headband form that comfortably and cordlessly evict the outside world from your headspace. They’re made from recycled plastic bottles, so when you glance out the window at that swirling vortex of trash in the Pacific, you’ll rest easy knowing you had little to do with it.  960 1280

SleepPhones  

First Class Sound, Even in Coach

First Class Sound, Even in Coach

When you want to feel fancy even when you're sitting by the aft lavatory, slip these tony Symphony 1 cans over your ears and let the vulgarians speculate as to the aristocrat in their midst. These premium Definitive Technology Bluetooth headphones feature 50mm drivers for high-quality sound and pack a battery with 10 hours of run time, although these leather and chrome babies should score you an inflight upgrade to business class before that ELO playlist blows your cover.  960 1280

Symphony1  

Heavenly Sleep

Heavenly Sleep

If you’re not a fan of bulky, neck pinching, swim camp looking travel pillows, the Travel Halo may be the answer to your prayers. While the oversized eye flap blocks out light, the two stabilizer pillows on the back of the headband keep your dome upright, balanced and comfortable. The Travel Halo packs into a tiny bag that fits neatly into your purse or pocket.  960 1280

Travel Halo  

Blue Light Special

Blue Light Special

Using a mobile device before trying to sleep is like Red Bull for your eyeballs. The blue light from phones and tablets inhibits the production of melatonin.  Enter WaveWall Sleep, an affordable blue light filter and screen protector for Apple and Android devices. Now you can use your mobile device until the sun comes up, secure in the knowledge that it won’t keep you from losing sleep.   960 1280

WaveWall Sleep  

Convertible Neckwear

Convertible Neckwear

There’s nothing more dashing than an aviator scarf, but they haven’t been functional flight wear since the open cockpit era. The Voyager Travel Pillow Set by Happy Luxe resuscitates the classic accessory by including two removable pillows that can be configured as neck support or a sleeping cushion. There’s even an air-activated warmer in case cabin temps dip below your comfort level. 960 1280

Voyager Travel  

Window Seat Upgrade

Window Seat Upgrade

The Znzi Travel Pillow instantly turns your porthole into a headrest. The plush, adjustable pillow has two suction cups that attach to your window, enabling you to make the most of a limited space. When you arrive, the pillow folds into a small slipcase that slides onto your luggage handle for quick deplaning. 960 1280

Znzi  

Cut Lines With Pre-Screening

Cut Lines With Pre-Screening

Signing up for TSA PreCheck can save time via dedicated lines where shoes stay on and laptops remain packed. Fast Track Global Entry makes sense for jetsetters with disposable income who don’t want to stand in the customs line. Both require advance paperwork and fees. 960 1280

JordiRamisa, iStock  

Pack Smart

Pack Smart

Pros pack with clothes at the bottom and oddly shaped items such as a hair dryer and shoes on top. Pack all the jewelry you will wear that day in an outside pocket of your carry-on, and then put it on once you pass through security so you don't have to take it off and put it on again. This enables the screener to work faster, saving time and keeping you moving. Savvy travelers also carry nothing on their person: no wallet, no keys, no gum. 960 1280

leminuit, iStock  

Get Alerts

Get Alerts

Many security checkpoint wait times are accessible via an airport’s website. Hartsfield-Jackson in Atlanta uses Trak-a-Line and will even email you when a line gets longer. MiFlight does the same for 50 major airports. Traffic jams can also put the brakes on smooth sailing. Check your drive time on an app like Waze, which gives you an ETA and reroutes you if there’s heavy traffic. 960 1280

laflor, iStock  

Be Liquid Free

Be Liquid Free

There are plenty of TSA-friendly concentrated waterless products and collapsible refillable water bottles so that flying through security is a breeze. For example, Lush Cosmetics offers dry shampoos and conditioners, toothpaste in tablet form and solid moisturizing bars that are great for an in-flight refresher. Silicone Bubi Bottles roll up, fit in the palm of your hand and come in many sizes. 960 1280

trekandshoot, iStock  

Carry On, Carry On

Carry On, Carry On

Don’t check bags unless you’re going on a month-long adventure. You’ve already waited around at check-in, don’t create even more opportunities to wait in lines. 960 1280

SkyRoll  

Use Airport Apps

Use Airport Apps

Flio connects you to airport WiFi connection and helps locate amenities like power outlets, play areas for kids and connecting gates. If you’re delayed or have some extra terminal time, FlySmart has reviews of terminal restaurants and shops by fellow travelers. The directionally challenged will love iFly, which uses GPS to help you reach that connecting gate without walking the wrong way.

 

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Flio  

Dress Like a Pro

Dress Like a Pro

Invest in a “plane outfit” consisting of classic items in dark or neutral colors made from breathable fabrics like cotton and cashmere. A nice poncho, like this one from Minnie Rose, subs as a blanket and is easily packed. Shorts, flip-flops and warm-ups make you look like an amateur. No gate agent is going to randomly upgrade a passenger wearing anything that makes noise when you walk. 

 

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Scott Goldberg, Minnie Rose  

Don't Cut Corners

Don't Cut Corners

Don’t skimp on your luggage. Look for pieces that keep all your documents and devices in one easily accessible place. Quality bags will hopefully last a lifetime; a cheap one could fall apart on an unexpected layover in Toledo.  960 1280

PeakDesign  

Mind Your Manners

Mind Your Manners

If you think you’re stressed, think of the men and women who do it every day. Should an emergency occur, they’re the ones who will help keep calm and even save lives, so show some respect. Treated with courtesy, a flight attendant might even slide you a free beverage or extra peanuts. One polite gesture can go a long way, on that long 2,134 mile route from ATL to LAX.  960 1280

andresrimaging, iStock  

Smart Bag

Smart Bag

A duffel bag or large backpack or other soft bag is the preferred choice for frequent travelers because it can be easily crammed into the overhead bin and is far less likely to be taken away from you to be checked at the gate. 960 1280

  

Travel Safe, Travel Healthy

Change Passwords

Change Passwords

Kevin Emert, chief information security officer of Scripps Network Interactive (Travel Channel's parent company), especially recommends this step for international travel. Change passwords before you leave and again when you return home for the accounts you know you’ll use while traveling.    960 1280

  

Remove Sensitive Data From Your Devices

Remove Sensitive Data From Your Devices

Before leaving on your trip, Emert advises backing up the devices you’re bringing, and then removing any sensitive data, such as financial statements.   960 1280

Courtney Keating  

Ensure Security on Your Devices is Up to Date

Ensure Security on Your Devices is Up to Date

Check that antivirus, malware and operating systems are up to date with security patches and features, says Emert. Password-protecting your devices is also another layer of security in case they're stolen. 960 1280

P D BURNETT  

Be Vigilant Against Theft

Be Vigilant Against Theft

While it’s important to take precautions against cyber hacking, Emert notes the most common problem while traveling with devices is theft. “Leaving it unattended for a matter of seconds could potentially lead to theft,” he says. Emert also cautions being mindful of those around you, since someone might be watching as you enter passwords.   960 1280

Tim Robberts  

Don’t Use USB Chargers in Public Spaces

Don’t Use USB Chargers in Public Spaces

Emert warns there’s a growing trend of “juice jacking,” where criminals can gain access to information on your device via the USB cable since it contains two wires—one for power, and one for data transfer.

Criminals can also use the USB cable to install ransomware, which allows them to hold your device ransom in exchange for money. Instead of using a USB port, Emert suggests using the AC power brick that plugs into a power outlet.

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serts  

Don’t Trust Public Wi-Fi

Don’t Trust Public Wi-Fi

This includes airports, hotels, trains and public spaces, regardless if the network is free, paid or password-protected. “If you’re on it, so is a would-be criminal,” says Emert. He also strongly cautions against connecting to financial institutions over a Wi-Fi network, particularly when abroad, whether through an app on your device or directly from the institution’s website. “You should assume that someone is probably watching you,” he says.  960 1280

Ezra Bailey  

Use a Personal Hotspot Connection

Use a Personal Hotspot Connection

A personal hotspot is a secure way to connect to the Internet via your wireless carrier's data plan if you lack Wi-Fi access—which is often the case when traveling. “Where a hotspot through a trusted carrier is available, that is a more secure method than choosing a public available wireless network,” says Emert.

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Petar Chernaev  

Turn Off Wireless Features You Don’t Need

Turn Off Wireless Features You Don’t Need

Traveling to a remote location isn't the only reason why you would turn off wireless capabilities. Emert says that services such as Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are designed to connect to available networks unless you have security features enabled. “Criminals can use those wireless connections to track your movement through an airport.” 960 1280

Jordan Siemens  

Use Your Debit Card as a Credit Card

Use Your Debit Card as a Credit Card

Cyber security also pertains to debit and credit cards. Emert says it’s safer to select the credit card option when making a purchase with a debit card since it requires a signature instead of a PIN number. It’s still debited from your account, but the signature requires a three-day waiting period before charging the purchase, whereas debit is instantaneous. The credit card feature is also insured in case an unauthorized purchase is made, and Emert notes it’s easier to recoup those losses from a credit card company than from your local bank. However, the safest method is a credit card with chip technology combined with your signature.

The exception would be using your debit card at an airport ATM, especially if it’s with a well-known banking institution. “The risk of your information being compromised at that ATM are relatively low.”
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Chronis Jons  

Leave Your Devices (and Non-Essential Personal Identification) at Home

Leave Your Devices (and Non-Essential Personal Identification) at Home

Finally, if you can manage without your laptop, phone or tablet, Emert says the safest place for them is at home. He also advises leaving behind any personal identification you don’t need, such as additional credit cards. Or if you’re traveling abroad, there’s no need to carry a driver’s license in addition to your passport. “When you’re traveling, assume, from a personal identification standpoint … that it’s not a safe environment,” says Emert. 960 1280

JGI/Tom Grill  

Wash Your Hands

Wash Your Hands

“Hand washing is the single most important thing anybody can do to protect their health,” advises. Dr. Philip Tierno, professor of Microbiology and Pathology at NYU School of Medicine and author of The Secret Life of Germs. He says you should spend 20 seconds washing, including under the nail beds.  

If you can’t wash your hands right away, Dr. Tierno warns against touching your face to prevent germs from entering via your eyes, nose or mouth. Additionally, Dr. Tierno and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend using hand sanitizer as an alternative to soap and water.
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Alexander Raths  

Visit a Travel Clinic

Visit a Travel Clinic

Phyllis Kozarsky, MD, professor of medicine and infectious diseases at Emory University, recommends visiting a travel clinic beforehand, particularly if you’re traveling to a developing country. The International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM) provides a list of travel clinics across the world. “It’s virtually impossible for even an outstanding general doctor… to keep up to date with all the things going on internationally.”

She suggests visiting a travel clinic 4-6 weeks prior to a trip. In addition to receiving any pertinent travel inoculations, Dr. Kozarsky also advises getting up to date with routine immunizations, such as tetanus and flu shots.  
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Cultura Science/Sigrid Gombert  

Boost Your Immunity Before a Long Flight

Boost Your Immunity Before a Long Flight

Travel expert Wendy Perrin, Founder of WendyPerrin.com, suggests taking Vitamin C before boarding a long flight. “Air is recycled on planes, and there are so many germs that can spread through the air on a plane.”

Emergen-C is also convenient since it comes in packets and can be added to water.

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Carry a Medical Kit

Carry a Medical Kit

Dr. Kozarsky advises packing whatever you use on a regular basis at home, including prescriptions, in a carry-on bag. She says Tylenol, Ibuprofen, cold medications, Neosporin, cortisone cream, first aid, Band-aids, gauze pads and medical tape are among the items in her kit.

Perrin says when traveling to developing countries she also brings Immodium for an upset stomach and a prescription antibiotic such as Zithromax or Cipro. Of course, ask your doctor what’s best for you.
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Prevent Bug Bites

Prevent Bug Bites

The extent to which you protect yourself depends on where you’re traveling, and the types of activities you’ll be doing, says Dr. Kozarsky. For example, Zika virus is currently prevalent in South America, the Caribbean and more. Check the CDC site for the most recent updates. However, Dr. Kozarsky cautions there are other serious mosquito-borne diseases to protect against, like malaria or dengue fever. In those cases, she recommends using an insect repellent containing between 25 and 35 percent DEET.

For more complete coverage, clothing may be treated with permethrin. She also suggests Picaridin, which is newer and considered milder on skin than DEET, but questions the effectiveness of more natural products in preventing bug bites. “Use an EPA-recommended product.”
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Chad Springer  

Get Enough Sleep

Get Enough Sleep

This can be difficult if your trip involves a hectic schedule, noisy hotels or frequent flights, but it’s key to maintaining a healthy immune system.  960 1280

Yuri Arcurs  

Stay Hydrated

Stay Hydrated

Long flights, activity-packed days and hot climates require more liquid than typically consumed at home. Opt for bottled water over sugary drinks, and strive for the equivalent of eight 8 oz. glasses during the course of a day. Certain foods, including watermelon, yogurt and cucumbers, also contain a high water content. 960 1280

  

Be Careful What You Eat and Drink

Be Careful What You Eat and Drink

Dr. Kozarsky notes that the CDC provides a lot of general recommendations, but “it’s not clear how much they work, as it depends on contamination of the food or beverage at any point when it could be handled.” That said, experts agree eating hot, steaming food is the safest option. In developing countries, the CDC suggests avoiding raw food, fruits and vegetables washed in tap water and food from street vendors. It’s okay to drink boiled or bottled water, hot beverages and carbonated drinks, but be careful of ice cubes made from tap water.

Dr. Tierno also warns against drinking the water in airplane bathrooms. “It is contaminated… it’s teeming with bacteria,” he says. He personally uses a hand sanitizer instead of washing his hands with it.
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Exercise

Exercise

If a regular fitness routine is part of a healthy lifestyle at home, try to maintain it while on the road. Many hotels include fitness centers, and in-room fitness programs are a growing trend. For example, celebrity yoga instructor Tara Stiles teemed up with W Hotels to provide short, instructional yoga videos. Depending on the area you’re in, running or riding bikes are also great ways to sightsee. 960 1280

Michael Blann  

Use Common Sense

Use Common Sense

Experts say to practice the same behaviors while traveling that you would at home. For example, Dr. Kozarsky doesn’t think it’s realistic for people to sanitize everything around them, and it also infringes on one’s ability to enjoy a trip. She cites how many germs we encounter in our daily lives, from the mall to the movie theater, “yet, somehow we become paranoid when we’re out of town.” 960 1280

ImagesBazaar  

Tech Tips For Every Device

Invest in a Good Case

Invest in a Good Case

Many experts recommend LifeProof as the best method to physically protect a phone, and options exist for both Apple and Android phones.

Besides protecting it from snow and dirt, LifeProof has also shown to waterproof phones six feet below water, and protect them from a six-foot drop. Dave Dean, Founder of tech site Too Many Adapters, also likes Taktik for iPhones. “You can throw it down a mountain and it will still work.”

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ODonnell Photograf  

Use a Screen Protector

Use a Screen Protector

Phil Baker, president of the product design company Techsperts, suggests getting a screen protector made from tempered glass, such as LionCover.Besides protecting your screen from scratches, it can also absorb an impact if dropped.

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Avoid Bringing Your Phone to the Beach

Avoid Bringing Your Phone to the Beach

Sun, sand and water can all be a phone’s arch nemesis. However, if it’s unavoidable, there are some ways to prevent major damage. If you don’t have a waterproof case, at the very least put it in a plastic bag to prevent getting it wet and sandy. Even better would be keeping it in a Sea to Summit bag, says Dean. Alternatively, there are companies such as Liquipel, which uses a liquid repellant to make phones water-resistant—but not waterproof.

For sun protection, Baker advises using a light-covered case and keeping it out of direct sunlight to prevent your phone from overheating. Additionally, Salt Cases claims to protect smartphones from extreme heat and cold by using a thermal technology employed by NASA.   
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Buena Vista Images  

Protect Your Phone From the Cold

Protect Your Phone From the Cold

It isn’t just extreme heat that can affect your phone. Apple doesn’t recommend using iPhones in temperatures below 32 degrees; adverse effects can include the battery draining or dying. Some Android phones fare better and can handle below-zero temperatures. That said, if you have to use your phone, avoid extended periods and try to keep it warm inside a pocket the rest of the time. Alternatively, using a protective case such as Salt Cases might help as well.  960 1280

Mike Crane Photography  

Bring a Portable Battery Charger

Bring a Portable Battery Charger

Anker is a popular choice for avoiding a dead battery, since it’s one of the best in the market for providing many hours of extended use in a lightweight package. (I personally own an Anker Astro E4 13000mAh, and it kept my phone alive while using battery-sucking GPS during an eight-hour road trip to Montreal.) 960 1280

baloon111  

Turn Your Phone Off

Turn Your Phone Off

Yes, it seems obvious, but due to our reliance on them it’s not always the first thought. Yet this simple act can preserve a battery, reduce the effects of extreme heat or cold, and prevent further water damage (such as short circuiting) if it’s turned off right away.  960 1280

Photographer: Leonardo Patrizi  

Prevent Your Phone From Getting Stolen

Prevent Your Phone From Getting Stolen

Depending on your destination, Johnny Jet, founder of travel site JohnnyJet.com, cautions against certain behaviors, such as placing your phone on a table at an outdoor restaurant, or keeping it in a bag. He personally wears a SCOTTeVEST jacket since it contains at least 20 pockets, including secret ones, to reduce the chance of having it stolen in case he’s mugged. Jet also buries his phone at the beach (in a LifeProof case) to prevent it from getting stolen while taking a dip in the ocean. (He places a towel on top as a marker.)

In the event your phone is stolen, the password protection feature, available on both iPhones and Androids, is a strong deterrent against thieves accessing your personal information.  
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martin-dm  

Don’t Leave Your Phone on an Airplane Seat During Takeoff and Landing

Don’t Leave Your Phone on an Airplane Seat During Takeoff and Landing

Jet says he’s heard stories of phones sliding off the seat and disappearing.  960 1280

  

Leave Your Phone in the Hotel Safe

Leave Your Phone in the Hotel Safe

If your trip involves activities that pose a high risk to phones, such as sky diving or snorkeling, consider leaving it behind. 960 1280

Billy Hustace  

Buy Insurance

Buy Insurance

Baker recommends AppleCare for iPhones and SquareTrade for Androids. “They’re much better than what you get from cell phone companies,” he says. These plans will cover damage resulting from common pitfalls such as dropping it or spilling water on it. 960 1280

  

Contain Water Damage

Contain Water Damage

Water damage is one of the most common threats to phones, but a wet phone doesn’t have to ruin a trip. First, turn the phone off if it hasn’t done so automatically. Dave Dean, Founder of tech site Too Many Adapters, warns against turning it back on, since that can damage the circuit board. Next, put your phone in a sealed bag or container of dry rice for two days. It may sound like an old wives tale, but experts agree this can work as a first line of defense—although Dean feels it works better if your phone was dropped in fresh water instead of salt water. He also recommends silica beads (packets are commonly found in many food items) as another way to remove moisture from your phone.  960 1280

Carlos Fernandez  

Deal With a Shattered Screen

Deal With a Shattered Screen

If the crack is minor, place a screen cover over it, or use clear packing tape. If the screen is completely shattered, Johnny Jet, founder of travel site JohnnyJet.com, says to put the phone in a plastic bag until you can get the screen replaced. Be careful about cutting yourself on shards of glass. Phil Baker, president of the product design company Techsperts, says it costs about $100 to replace a screen, and repair stores can easily fix it.

 

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Conserve a Low Battery

Conserve a Low Battery

Everything from extreme cold to overheating can affect your phone’s battery life. If you need to use your phone, Dean suggests putting an iPhone in airplane mode (newer Android models also feature a battery saver mode) and turning off as many connectivity features as possible. Facebook, GPS and gaming apps are among the notorious battery hogs.  960 1280

pawel_p  

Troubleshoot a Frozen Phone

Troubleshoot a Frozen Phone

First try performing a hard restart by pressing the power button until it turns off. Then try turning it back on after a few minutes. If this doesn’t work, remove and replace the phone’s battery if your phone has a removable battery (not all do). As a last resort, do a factory reset, which will restore your phone to its original factory settings. However, you will lose all of your phone’s data unless it was recently backed up. 960 1280

Pamela Moore  

Replace a Dead Battery

Replace a Dead Battery

For certain models, such as Samsung, you can simply remove the back cover by pulling it off, then easily pop out the battery and replace it. Make sure the phone is powered off before attempting this. Keep in mind that you should use an OEM battery (original equipment manufacturer) so that it doesn’t void the warranty. 960 1280

VladTeodor  

Address Overheating

Address Overheating

High temperatures and overuse are among the conditions that can cause overheating. Turn off any applications that are running in the background (e.g. Instagram, Facebook) or simply turn off your phone. Removing a protective case and placing your phone in a cool (but not cold) environment can also help. 960 1280

MCGeorge & BLACK CAT Photography  

Address Extreme Cold

Address Extreme Cold

If your phone has been exposed to arctic temps, turn if off, and place it in a pocket or wrap it in an item of clothing until it warms up to room temperature. Don’t try any heating methods on it.  960 1280

massimo colombo  

8. Find a Phone Repair Shop

8. Find a Phone Repair Shop

Dean says small repair stores are a great option, particularly if you’re nowhere near an Apple store, or don’t own an iPhone. These are usually easy to find around the world. 960 1280

Michael Coyne  

9. Use Your Insurance

9. Use Your Insurance

Baker recommends AppleCare for iPhones and SquareTrade for Androids. Both of these plans cover international travel, but read the fine print to learn what a particular plan includes before buying it. While plans typically cover damage resulting from water, falls or other maladies, they might come with a high deductible. Some plans don't reimburse theft or loss either. 960 1280

agencybook  

10. Switch to a Backup Phone

10. Switch to a Backup Phone

Many experts travel with a second phone, and it might be the best bet if you’re nowhere near a repair store and the usual fixes don’t work. Dean advises traveling with an old phone. “Make sure it’s still in a useable state; otherwise it’s just a paperweight if it doesn’t have the apps, contacts and information you need.”   960 1280

  

Check Your Tech

Check Your Tech

These days we think nothing of travelling with several thousand dollars worth of personal technology, not to mention the invaluable data that sits on our laptops, tablets and phones. You wouldn’t carry that much cash around in a Trader Joe’s bag, so why would you toss your devices into a backpack with shampoo and flip-flops? Tech luggage is no place to cut corners. Your first tech-packing tip: Inventory all your tech items and decide which ones you can do without.  960 1280

  

Everything Has a Place

Everything Has a Place

Need a device at the bottom of the bag in midflight? Everything has to come out. With the Peak Design Everyday Messenger bag your gear is thoughtfully compartmentalized: Cameras are packed in the middle, while your laptop fits in the rear with separate access to get you through airport security quickly. Color-coded internal pockets allow you to locate accessories instantly—there’s even a clandestine side pocket for your phone. If Batman took vacations, he’d carry one of these.   960 1280

  

Don’t be a GoPro Amateur

Don’t be a GoPro Amateur

GoPro cameras are accustomed to extreme conditions: they’ve gone up Everest, surfed Mavericks and leapt out of airplanes, but even a sturdy adventure camera is no match for a careless baggage handler who’s having a bad day. GoPole has an entire line of GoPro accessories including mounts, cases and chargers. The Explorer Bundle organizes everything a YouTube daredevil could possibly need in a convenient and secure carrying case.  960 1280

  

Well-Placed Tools

Well-Placed Tools

Gravity has a way of turning your backpack into a mystery grab bag. The Crisscross Caddy is a two-sided organizer that eliminates wanton burrowing by keeping your necessities within easy reach. One side secures your tablet in place while the other arranges smaller items like your phone, charger, lipstick and pens. The woven elastic straps make it easy to organize all your important items, regardless of size and shape.  960 1280

  

Soft Landing

Soft Landing

If you must leave your laptop or tablet in your suitcase, make sure it is suffiiciently padded. If your current luggage won't do the trick, you can even use leftover bubble wrap from home. The SkyRoll Spinner's interior has a padded sleeve located in the back of the case as extra protection for your laptop or tablet.  960 1280

Don_Chernoff  

Power Packing

Power Packing

Conventional backpacks are among the worst ways to tote your tech and provide almost no isolation for your expensive devices. If you don't have individual cases for each one, invest in a backpack designed to protect them. The Drifter Energy backpack from STM has fleece-lined pockets that are situated above the bottom of the bag to prevent damage and there’s an on-board battery charger to keep you juiced.  960 1280

2013ErikPeterson  

Prevents Memory Loss

Prevents Memory Loss

SD cards are the size of postage stamps, but lose one and say goodbye to a universe of memories. Even worse, someone else might find them. Pelican’s flash card case holds six memory cards in a shock absorbing, water-resistant shell that’s harder to lose than that last 10 pounds.  960 1280

  

Keep 'em Separated

Keep 'em Separated

Throwing caution to the wind along with loose toiletries in a bag is never a good idea. The Travel Flex bag is a tri-foldable accessory bag with a mesh laundry pouch and six clear pockets with reinforced zippers that will prevent your moisturizer from getting intimate with your iPad. If you're still nervous about leaking liquids, double up and pack them in Ziploc bags.  960 1280

  

This Pro Knows

This Pro Knows

Noted travel writer and photographer James Kaiser knows a thing or two about travelling with expensive gear. He once took a shortcut in packing his camera equipment and learned a costly lesson. Now, he never leaves home without the tools of his trade secured. Don’t arrive at your destination with shattered hopes and lenses. Be like James.  960 1280

James Kaiser  

Dedicated Space

Dedicated Space

Pack your devices so that each has its own dedicated space. Should you need something in a hurry you'll know where it is. And, if that space is empty you'll know you left it behind. Tortuga backpacks makes cube inserts designed specifically with this in mind. Into saving money? You can also use thick upcycled plastic bags made for bed linens.  960 1280

  

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