Daily Escape

people sit outside at a garden created in the center of berlin in the daytime

Prinzessinnengärten (Berlin, Germany)

Built where a department store once stood before being bombed in World War II, the Prinzessinnengärten (“Princess Garden”) is now a beautiful and engaging urban green space that teaches about organic food production and climate protection.

More to Do in Berlin

brandenburg Gate with fountain in center of berlin during the day
Brandenburg Gate

Brandenburg Gate

Brandenburg Gate is probably the most famous structure in Berlin and perhaps all of Germany. This Roman-style wall has stood near the border of East and West Berlin since its completion in 1791. 960 1280

  

East Side Gallery

East Side Gallery

A lasting reminder of a tortured past and a bright future, the East Side Gallery in Berlin is a stretch of the Berlin Wall along the Spree River. It has been turned into a memorial of the Cold War and a celebration of the city’s ever-growing art scene.  960 1280

  

Markthalle 9

Markthalle 9

Visit Markthalle 9 to experience the flavor of Berlin and the people who live there. A marketplace selling local, seasonal and sustainably grown foods, Markthalle 9 in the Kreuzberg neighborhood is a must-see destination during your visit to Berlin. 960 1280

  

The Fernsehturm

The Fernsehturm

The Fernsehturm (also known simply as the TV Tower), which stands in Berlin’s famous Alexanderplatz, is the tallest structure in Germany at more than 1,200 feet.  960 1280

  

The Prinzessinnengärten

The Prinzessinnengärten

The Prinzessinnengärten is an urban garden that’s smack-dab in the middle of the hustle and bustle of Berlin. Here, you can get fresh fruits and vegetables and even order from a cafe that uses food from its own garden. 960 1280

  

The Berlin Cathedral

The Berlin Cathedral

The Berlin Cathedral stands on Museum Island in the borough of Mitte. The current building was constructed in the early part of the 20th century. Despite its common moniker, it is not actually a cathedral, since it has never been the seat of a bishop. However, it does hold regular church service. 960 1280

  

25Hours Hotel Bikini Berlin

25Hours Hotel Bikini Berlin

If you’re looking for a trendy new place to stay during your trip, check out the 25Hours Hotel Bikini Berlin. With a modern, chic design and cozy décor, it will make you feel right at home. 960 1280

  

Reichstag Dome

Reichstag Dome

Built in the years following the reunification of Germany, the Reichstag Dome is an all-glass structure that sits atop the also-rebuilt Reichstag Building, which houses the German parliament. 960 1280

Mike Peel (www.mikepeel.net).  

The Wyld

The Wyld

Germans may have had a reputation for being stern and close-minded, but not anymore. Check out The Wyld, a show at the Friedrichstadt-Palast theater, for a performance that is risqué, beautiful and thrilling all at the same time. 960 1280

  

Alte Nationalgalerie

Alte Nationalgalerie

Another resident of Museum Island is the Alte Nationalgalerie, which houses some of the most treasured artwork in Germany. It was the original building for the National Gallery and now includes pieces from the neoclassical and Romantic movements. If you are a lover of art, you have to visit the Alte Nationalgalerie. 960 1280

By Thomas Wolf  

Sony Center

Sony Center

A view from inside the soaring Sony Center. Completed in 2000, the complex is a mix of shops, restaurants, accommodations, offices, cinemas and more. 960 1280

Thomas Winz/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Reichstag

Reichstag

The historic Reichstag building houses Germany's parliament. Opened in 1894, it was severely damaged by a fire in 1933 and wasn't fully restored until 1999 by renowned architect Norman Foster. Today, it is once again the meeting place for Bundestag, the modern German parliament. 960 1280

Casper Wilkens/iStock/Getty Images  

Kindertransport

Kindertransport

A sculpture commemorates the Kindertransport, a campaign to get Jewish children to the United Kingdom during World War II. 960 1280

typo-graphics/iStock.com  

Grunewald Forest

Grunewald Forest

The famous forest on Berlin's western edge is the largest green area in the city and is crisscrossed with trails for hikers, bikers and horseback riders. 960 1280

Konrad Wothe/Look/Getty Images  

Berlin Hauptbanhof

Berlin Hauptbanhof

Berlin Hauptbanhof, or Berlin Central Station, is the city's main train station and fairly new, as it wasn't fully operational until 2006.  960 1280

Athanasios Gioumpasis/Getty Images   

Holocaust Memorial

Holocaust Memorial

A somber view from within the controversial Holocaust Memorial. Designed by architect Peter Eisenman and engineer Buro Happold, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe is nearly 5 acres and is covered with 2,711 concrete slabs arranged in a grid on a sloping field. 960 1280

Allan Baxter / Photolibrary / Getty Images  

The Jewish Museum

The Jewish Museum

The unique facade of the Jewish Museum, which opened in September 2001. The complex is made up of the Old Building, the baroque Collegienhaus, the postmodern Libeskind Building and the Glass Courtyard. 960 1280

Izzet Keribar / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images  

Brandenburg Gate

Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate overlooks Pariser Platz, a square in the center of the city. The former city gate, rebuilt in the late 18th century as a triumphal arch, is one of the most recognized landmarks in Berlin. 960 1280

Nikada / Vetta / Getty Images  

The Berlin Wall Museum

The Berlin Wall Museum

Fifteen years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, a private museum rebuilt a 650-foot section close to Checkpoint Charlie, but not in the original location of the wall. 960 1280

Hans-Peter Merten / Robert Harding World Imagery / Getty Images  

Tour Berlin   9 Photos

The Ritz-Carlton
The Ritz-Carlton

The Ritz-Carlton

The Ritz-Carlton, Berlin, features mahogany furniture, plush bedding and massive marble bathrooms like the one seen here. Guests have access to a large spa, indoor pool, sauna and fitness center. The upscale French brasserie, tea lounge, and British gentlemen’s club-inspired bar are the icing on the oh-so-delicious cake. This is definitely the frontrunner for those guests seeking a luxe experience in the German capital. 960 1280

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Hotel Sir F.K. Savigny

Hotel Sir F.K. Savigny

The ultra-modern black and white motif throughout the Sir F. K. Savigny Hotel Berlin is located in the city’s Charlottenburg neighborhood -- full of intimate restaurants and elegant shops. It’s a short walk from Ku’Damm, an area lined with upscale boutiques and designer stores. The 45 rooms are bright and modern. The outdoor garden is a major plus, but the bathrooms do lack complete privacy and food is sometimes expensive. 960 1280

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Hotel Savoy Berlin

Hotel Savoy Berlin

The historic Hotel Savoy Berlin opened its doors in 1929. Large, traditional rooms with simple bathrooms feature free Wi-Fi, coffee machines and flat-screen TVs. The elegant Charlottenburg neighborhood is home to several upscale businesses -- as well as great restaurants and shops. Plus the hotel’s on-site cigar lounge (pictured), small fitness center with sauna, reliable restaurants and rooftop terrace are all great locales to merge and acquire as you see fit. 960 1280

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Estrel Berlin

Estrel Berlin

For the business traveler with larger plans in mind, Estrel Berlin is the city’s best option. With a 15,000 square meter convention center with multiple stages, this behemoth hotel can accommodate any business trip. The Estrel has 1,125 rooms and suites, 5 restaurants, 2 bars, a summer garden and a concert venue with performances happening almost every night. The complex’s rooms are simple and modern, with solid amenities. 960 1280

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Abba Berlin Hotel

Abba Berlin Hotel

For couples seeking some peace and quiet, the Abba Berlin Hotel is a tranquil retreat located near stylish Ku’Damm. Rooms are plush and neutral, with whimsical design touches like the crystal chandelier seen here. The hotel’s chic restaurant and lounge are great spots to relax after a long day of sightseeing. The wellness center -- featuring an indoor Jacuzzi, sauna, and fitness center -- is a great addition that couples are sure to enjoy. 960 1280

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Hotel Art Nouveau

Hotel Art Nouveau

This charming, family-run B&B in Charlottenburg features 22 individually decorated rooms in a historic apartment building, complete with an antique cage elevator. Rooms at the Hotel Art Nouveau have stucco ceilings, wooden floors and a great mix of antiques and contemporary decor. The star of your stay, however, is the food. An organic breakfast buffet is served daily in the sunny breakfast room while an evening honesty bar is a great place to relax come nightfall. 960 1280

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Michelberger Hotel

Michelberger Hotel

A trendy, budget-friendly option popular with the hipster crowd, the Michelberger Hotel is set in a former warehouse in the Friedrichshain neighborhood. The hotel offers a variety of rooms that all exude an artsy vibe. It’s also known for its stylish lobby and bar with live DJs. Throw in a couple of odd extras -- a huge bird’s nest in the hotel’s garden, a foosball table off the lobby and funky accessories -- and any flannel-sporting traveler will be pleased. Visitors will enjoy the nearby East Side Gallery, Fairytale Fountain, and Karl-Marx-Allee. 960 1280

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Precise Casa Berlin

Precise Casa Berlin

While at first glance this mid-range boutique doesn’t seem family-friendly, it actually comes with quite a few perks without sacrificing style. Deluxe rooms and apartments offer a huge amount of space, kitchenettes and soaking tubs -- which means plenty of room for the tykes to play and a haven for mom or dad after bedtime. Located in Charlottenburg, the Precise Casa Berlin is in a safe, elegant neighborhood full of shops and restaurants perfect for strolling with the family. 960 1280

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Hotel Berlin Ku'Damm

Hotel Berlin Ku'Damm

With rates sometimes falling as low as $60, the Grand City Hotel Berlin Ku’Damm is an excellent option for those traveling on a budget. Quiet rooms are stylish, with flat-screen TVs, playful modern design, and updated bathrooms. Unique touches, like the jazz-themed breakfast area and lobby fireplace, make the hotel stand out from the competition. Plus, the hotel’s location close to Berlin’s best shopping is ideal. 960 1280

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Bleibtreu Hotel

Bleibtreu Hotel

If hanging with the locals is your thing, then the Bleibtreu Hotel is one of your best options in Berlin. A boutique property that has managed to ingratiate itself with its neighborhood, Bleibtreu offers a charming bistro/diner and a flower shop with an outdoor garden that is often frequented by locals. Although small, the rooms are stylish, functional, and decorated with natural materials. Some have balconies. This hotel is a great pick if you’re looking to capture that true Berlin vibe. 960 1280

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More Incentive to Get Lost Abroad

Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

The awe-inspiring Cliffs of Moher, stretching 8 miles along the western Atlantic Coast near the town of Dongal, aren’t for the faint of heart; there’s no fence between you and the 650-foot drop to the sea below. 960 1280

Patryk Kosmider  

The Ring of Gullion

The Ring of Gullion

The Ring of Gullion, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, is a breathtaking volcanic landscape in Northern Ireland that dates back more than 60 million years. 960 1280

cranneyanthony, Flickr  

The Burren

The Burren

In County Clare, the Burren consists of 116 square miles of naturally interlocking limestone slabs. Contrasting Irish flora thrives by the limestone in the Burren, nourished by a system of underground streams and rivers that rise to the surface during Ireland's wet weather. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Slieve League

Slieve League

Ireland is known for its amazing cliffs. Top of the list is Slieve League on Donegal’s west coast; it’s one of the highest marine cliffs in Europe. The straight 985-foot drop from Slieve League into the crashing Atlantic below is sure to get your heart racing. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Croagh Patrick

Croagh Patrick

Croagh Patrick is a sacred mountain that towers more than 2,500 feet above County Mayo, in western Ireland. The mountain is devoted to Ireland's patron saint, Patrick, who is said to have spent 40 days and nights praying and fasting here. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Giant's Causeway

Giant's Causeway

A volcanic eruption some 60 million years ago caused geological formations now known as the Giant's Causeway. Today, the area is renowned for its unique columns of stone. It’s also the only UNESCO World Heritage Site in Northern Ireland. 960 1280

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Carrantouhill

Carrantouhill

Ireland’s highest mountain, Carrantouhill, in County Kerry, is composed of red sandstone, and molded by geological ice action in the form of sharp peaks and corries (scooped-out basins). 960 1280

saturar  

11 Photos
Generalife Gardens (Granada)

Generalife Gardens (Granada)

Schedule some extra time to stroll through the Generalife’s High and Low Gardens. Take the 19th-century Stairway of the Lions to the High Gardens, and see water fountains, beautiful magnolia trees, scented shrubs and other flora spread across several terraces on the palatial estate. Tourists may be lucky enough to catch the Granada International Festival of Music and Dance, held each summer in the Generalife’s outdoor amphitheater, located nearby. 960 1280

Ivan Bastien/iStock/Getty Images  

Prado Museum (Madrid)

Prado Museum (Madrid)

Open since November 1819, the Prado Museum houses several collections and more than 2,300 paintings, including El Greco’s The Flight to Egypt and Goya’s The Countess of Chinchon. The museum hosts exhibitions featuring works by well-renowned artists such as Michelangelo, Picasso and Rembrandt.
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Emad Aljumah/Moment/Getty Images  

Plaza Mayor (Madrid)

Plaza Mayor (Madrid)

Thousands of tourists converge on Plaza Mayor each year. Shops and cafes are located around the square, and it’s not uncommon to see street performers entertaining the foot traffic that’s flowing through the popular tourist destination. Grab a seat, order a pitcher of sangria and enjoy the weather and people-watching. 960 1280

StockstudioX/Vetta/Getty Images  

Sagrada Familia Basilica (Barcelona)

Sagrada Familia Basilica (Barcelona)

You cannot leave Barcelona without seeing the Basilica de la Sagrada Familia, a magnificent work of art that is still in progress after more than a century. In 1883, Spanish architect Antoni Gaudi was commissioned to complete the project started by Francisco de Paula del Villar. Gaudi finished the chapel of San Jose, the crypt and the Nativity facade, but after his death, different architects continued to work on and add to his original idea. 960 1280

Wangkun Jia/iStock/Getty Images  

Gothic Quarter (Barcelona)

Gothic Quarter (Barcelona)

Take a stroll through Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, located in the city’s Ciutat Vella (“Old City”) district. Most of the streets are closed to traffic, allowing tourists to wander from La Rambla to Via Laietana to view the city’s medieval past. 960 1280

Manfred Gottschalk/Lonely Planet Images/ Getty Images  

Horchata (Valencia)

Horchata (Valencia)

Travel to Valencia, the home of horchata. This tasty concoction — made from tigernuts, water and sugar — is a summer beverage that is usually served cold. To sample your first horchata, head to Horchateria Santa Catalina, which is located in Valencia’s Santa Catalina Plaza. 960 1280

Bhofack2/iStock/Getty Images  

Valencian Paella (Valencia)

Valencian Paella (Valencia)

During the mid-19th century, paella originated near the Albufera lagoon in Valencia. Locals and tourists can try seafood paella, mixed paella or Valencian paella, which is made with white rice, green vegetables, chicken, rabbit, land snails, beans and seasoning. We recommend sampling paella at a local restaurant such as La Matandeta, La Pepica or Tridente Restaurant. 960 1280

Azmanl/iStock/Getty Images  

Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba (Cordoba)

Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba (Cordoba)

Tourists who visit Cordoba, Spain, should add a tour of the Mosque-Cathedral of Cordoba — also known simply as the Great Mosque-Cathedral — to their must-do list. On the site originally was a Catholic church, which was then divided into Christian and Muslim halves after the Muslims conquered Spain in 711. Caliph ’Abd al-Rahman I purchased the Christian half, tore down the church and built the current magnificent structure, a monument to Moorish architecture, in 784. Today, it is a Roman Catholic cathedral, despite the pleas from Spanish Muslim lobbyists who want to be allowed to pray there. 960 1280

Perseomed/iStock/Getty Images  

Alhambra (Granada)

Alhambra (Granada)

Visit the Alhambra, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Granada. During the 13th century, this palace and fortress was the residence of the Nasrid sultans, as well as top government officials, court servants and the royal guard. Hidden by a thick wooded area, the Alhambra consists of 4 zones: the palaces, the military zone, the city and the villa of the Generalife, located on the country estate of the Nasrid emirs. 960 1280

Lenoriux/iStock/Getty Images  

Plaza de Espana (Seville)

Plaza de Espana (Seville)

Does Seville’s Plaza de Espana look familiar? The square — located on the edge of Maria Luisa Park — has been used as a filming location for movies such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Dictator, Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace and Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones. Designed by Anibal Gonzalez, the Plaza de Espana has tiled alcoves that each represent a different province of Spain. Today, it is home to museums and government buildings. 960 1280

Geography Photos/Universal Images Group/Getty Images  

The Alcazar (Seville)

The Alcazar (Seville)

The upper levels of the Alcazar of Seville are home to the royal family, making it the oldest European royal palace still in use. The Alcazar was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987, and it is well-renowned as one of the most beautiful palaces in Spain. Explore the history of this amazing complex for a small entrance fee, about $10. 960 1280

Getty Images/Nicole Thonon  

Ancient Edinburgh Castle

Ancient Edinburgh Castle

The glorious Edinburgh Castle has been perched on this rocky hillside overlooking the city for over a thousand years. Queen Margaret, one of Scotland's patron saints, died here in 1093, and the ill-fated Mary, Queen of Scots, took up residence in the 16th century. Now a military fort, the castle houses the Stone of Destiny and Scotland's crown jewels. 960 1280

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Gallery Trio

Gallery Trio

Three more free-entry institutions, Scotland's national galleries, are dotted around the capital. The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art is housed in a dynamic duo of buildings west of downtown; the Scottish National Portrait Gallery is tucked just off Princes Street; and the jewel in the crown, the Scottish National Gallery, with its Rembrandts, van Goghs and Monets, holds court right on Princes Street. 960 1280

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Birds' Eye Views: Arthur's Seat

Birds' Eye Views: Arthur's Seat

Fantastic photo opportunities await all those who clamber up the 3-mile trail to the top of this long dormant, 822-feet-high volcano. Just a mile from Edinburgh Castle, the craggy hill still has remnants of a prehistoric fort visible on its summit. The trail starts at the foot of the Royal Mile. 960 1280

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Back Street Social: Rose Street

Back Street Social: Rose Street

Another shopping street, but one with a more social slant, Rose Street runs parallel to Princes Street for 4 busy blocks. It's a narrow lane, packed with pubs, cafes and fashion stores, jammed with shoppers by day and revelers by night. 960 1280

  

Another Capital Address for the Queen: The Palace of Holyroodhouse

Another Capital Address for the Queen: The Palace of Holyroodhouse

This palace was originally built by King James IV in the early 1500s and is still Queen Elizabeth II's official Scottish address today, but it's better known as having been backdrop to the soap opera-like life of the tempestuous Mary, Queen of Scots. She got married here twice and saw her second husband murdered within these walls. Today, visitors can explore the State and Historic Apartments and visit the art gallery, cafe and store. 960 1280

iStock  

Politically Correct: The Scottish Parliament

Politically Correct: The Scottish Parliament

It's not all ancient wonders around here. The Scottish Parliament opened in 2004, a jagged, modern anchor at the foot of the ancient Royal Mile. Built after the Scottish Parliament reconvened after 300 years, it offers events and exhibitions on art, politics, science and influential Scots. 960 1280

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All Aboard the Royal Yacht Britannia

All Aboard the Royal Yacht Britannia

The Queen's former floating residence bobs at the docks of Leith now that it's not off doing diplomatic duty around the world. Visitors can explore all 5 decks, see the Royal Apartments and stop for afternoon tea and cake in the Royal Deck Tea Room. 960 1280

Wikimedia Commons   

A Royal Treat: Princes Street

A Royal Treat: Princes Street

A broad boulevard lined with upscale stores on its north side, Princes Street's south side is dotted with parks, monuments and museums. Its cafes make stunning spots to sit and look up at Edinburgh Castle, looming above. 960 1280

iStock  

Playtime at the Museum of Childhood

Playtime at the Museum of Childhood

The Museum of Childhood has been entertaining Scottish kids in this historic 18th century building since 1957. With collections of toys, games, clothes and books that date from the 18th to 21st centuries and a puppet theatre, it's an ideal rainy day stop on the Royal Mile. 960 1280

Getty Images  

The Castle Hill: The Royal Mile

The Castle Hill: The Royal Mile

The Royal Mile links Edinburgh Castle with the Palace of Holyroodhouse, located a mile below. Steep, cobbled and flanked by tall, narrow buildings that date as far back as the early 1500s, the ancient street and myriad dark lanes that wind off it look like the set from Harry Potter. It's not a coincidence that J.K. Rowling wrote her wizard books just off this historic street. 960 1280

iStock  

Leith's Reborn Docklands

Leith's Reborn Docklands

Edinburgh's port since the year 1329, Leith lies at the point where the Water of Leith reaches the Firth of Forth and the North Sea. Once a rough and rowdy neighborhood, today Leith is awash with hip bars, chic eateries and boutique hotels. 960 1280

iStock  

Two-for-One: The National Museums of Scotland

Two-for-One: The National Museums of Scotland

A real bonus for those on a budget or saving their sterling; entry to Edinburgh's main museums are free. The National War Museum is housed at Edinburgh Castle, while the newly reopened National Museum of Scotland covers it all, from wildlife to world cultures and the wonders of science. 960 1280

subberculture, flickr  

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