Extreme Adventure Sports

See the most extreme sports adventures around the world, from spear fishing to skydiving.

Tags

Photos

Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

Muhammad Ali was born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. in Louisville, KY, on Jan.17, 1942. It wasn’t until he was a teenager that he acquired a passion for boxing. His bike had been stolen in front of the city’s Columbia Auditorium; young Cassius Clay vowed to “whip the robber’s butt.” Soon he began training to become a boxer. 960 1280

Louisville Convention Bureau  

Rome

Rome

Cassius Clay wins the light heavyweight gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome. After returning to the US, he would later toss his Olympic medal into the Ohio River after he was turned away from a whites-only restaurant and got into a brawl with a white gang. 960 1280

Central Press/Getty Images  

LA's Main Street Gym

LA's Main Street Gym

Cassius Clay trains at the Main Street Gym in LA (pictured) for an upcoming fight against Archie Moore on Nov. 15, 1962. 960 1280

The Ring Magazine/Getty Images  

NYC

NYC

Known as braggart and rapid-fire talker, Cassius Clay gets his mouth taped by his trainer Angelo Dundee during his weigh-in before a match against heavyweight boxer Doug Jones. In a unanimous decision, Clay wins the match in 10 rounds on March 13, 1963. 960 1280

George Silk/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images  

Miami Beach, Florida

Miami Beach, Florida

Black Muslim leader Malcolm X, behind the soda fountain, jokes with tux-clad Cassius Clay. The 2 notable men meet in a Miami Beach restaurant surrounded by jubilant fans after the boxer beats Sonny Liston for the heavyweight championship of the world title on Feb. 25, 1964. 960 1280

Bob Gomel/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images  

Miami's 5th Street Gym

Miami's 5th Street Gym

American heavyweight boxer Cassius Clay (center) poses in the ring in a mock victory over The Beatles at the 5th Street Gym in Miami before his first WBA/WBC World Heavyweight title fight against Sonny Liston (Feb. 22, 1964). The Beatles are visiting the US for the first time. On the canvas, left to right: Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. 960 1280

Chris Smith/Getty Images  

London's Apollo Victoria Theater

London's Apollo Victoria Theater

On March 6, 1964, Cassius Clay, Jr. converts to the Nation of Islam and religious leader Elijah Muhammad gives him his new name, Muhammad Ali, which means “praiseworthy one.” The professional boxer becomes a vocal activist, who travels around the world to speak before thousands of people, including here at the New Victoria Theater in London (pictured). 960 1280

Tim Graham/Evening Standard/Getty Images  

Giza, Egypt

Giza, Egypt

In 1964, Ali visits the Sphinx and the pyramids at Giza, Egypt. 960 1280

Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images  

Glasgow, Scotland

Glasgow, Scotland

On Aug. 18, 1965, American WBC world heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali is greeted by a traditional Scottish pipe band on his arrival at Glasgow airport. Ali travels to the city for a series of exhibition matches. 960 1280

Daily Express/Pictorial Parade/Archive Photos/Getty Images  

Stardust Resort and Casino

Stardust Resort and Casino

On Nov. 4, 1965, Muhammad Ali trains at the Stardust Resort and Casino in Las Vegas before his match against Floyd Patterson. He knocks Patterson out in the 12th round and retains his WBC World Heavyweight title. 960 1280

Lee Balterman /Sports Illustrated/Getty Images  

Madison Square Garden

Madison Square Garden

Banned from boxing for 3 1/2 years for not serving in the Vietnam War, Cassius Clay returns to the ring in a boxing match against WBC/WBA world heavyweight boxing champ Joe Frazier. Ali would lose to Frazier in the match called the “Fight of the Century,” held at NYC’s Madison Square Garden on March 8, 1971. 960 1280

Neil Leifer/Sports Illustrated/Getty Images  

Zurich, Switzerland

Zurich, Switzerland

With his daughters in tow, Muhammad Ali trains for a fight against German boxer Jürgen Blin in Zurich, Switzerland, on Dec. 26, 1971. 960 1280

Central Press/Getty Images  

Kinshasa, Zaire (Congo)

Kinshasa, Zaire (Congo)

On Oct. 30, 1974, Ali challenges George Foreman for the WBC/WBA World Heavyweight title at 20 Mai Stadium in Kinshasa, Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo). Ali’s “rope-a-dope” strategy tires Foreman down, allowing Ali to knock out Foreman in the 8th round and eventually win the title. 960 1280

Neil Leifer/Sports Illustrated/Getty Images  

Philippines

Philippines

In their third fight against one another for the world heavyweight title, Ali defeats Joe Frazier in the “Thrilla in Manila” fight in Quezon City, Philippines (Oct. 1, 1975). This match is now known as one of the greatest battles in the history of boxing. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Las Vegas

Las Vegas

Contrary to what this picture may indicate, Muhammad Ali would go on to lose to Leon Spinks in this split-decision boxing match held in Las Vegas on Feb. 15, 1978. Six months later, Ali wins back the heavyweight title in a rematch at the Superdome in New Orleans. Ali losses his last 2 boxing matches of his boxing career before he officially retires with a record of 56 wins and 5 losses, retaining his unofficial title as the greatest boxer of all time. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Muhammad Ali Boulevard

Muhammad Ali Boulevard

In 1978, busy Walnut Street in Louisville, KY, is renamed Muhammad Ali Boulevard. 960 1280

wblo, flickr  

The Vatican

The Vatican

In 1982, Pope John Paul II and the former US heavyweight boxing champion sign autographs for each other at the end of their meeting at the Vatican. Two years later, Ali announces he’s been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. He would soon step into a new arena -- as a humanitarian. In 1990, Ali visits Iraq to negotiate with Saddam Hussein for the release of 14 American hostages. 960 1280

Reuters  

United Nations

United Nations

In 1998, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan names Ali a United Nations Messenger of Peace. 960 1280

  

Atlanta

Atlanta

In 1998, Ali lights the first torch to start the Olympic Torch Relay at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. The former boxing champ also carried the torch for the Salt Lake City 2002 Winter Olympic Games. 960 1280

Reuters  

Kabul, Afghanistan

Kabul, Afghanistan

On Nov. 18, 2002, Muhammad Ali (center) sits with Afghan students during his visit to Karte Sei High School for Girls in Kabul, Afghanistan. He visits Kabul on a 3-day special mission as a UN Messenger of Peace. 960 1280

Paula Bronstein/UNICEF/Getty Images  

White House

White House

Ali visits the White House where President George W. Bush awards the former heavyweight champion with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest US civilian honor (Nov. 9, 2005). 960 1280

Douglas A. Sonders/Getty Images  

Muhammad Ali Center

Muhammad Ali Center

In 2005, the Muhammad Ali Center opens in Louisville, KY. Ali and his family continue to devote their time to the center, and to raise awareness and organize fundraisers for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow Neurological Institute -- in hopes of finding a cure for Parkinson’s disease. 960 1280

Steve Magruder, Wikimedia Commons  

Rupp Arena

Rupp Arena

Rupp Arena - University of Kentucky
Named after legendary head coach Adolph Rupp, Rupp Arena in downtown Lexington, KY, has definitely seen its share of victories. The University of Kentucky Wildcats own the record for the most wins in Division I men's college basketball history, and play in the largest basketball arena in the US. With arguably the most passionate fans in college basketball and more than 23,500 seats, they don't get more wild then Rupp Arena and the fans of Big Blue Nation.
960 1280

Getty Images  

Carrier Dome

Carrier Dome

Carrier Dome - Syracuse University
The Carrier Dome in Syracuse, NY, has to pull double duty as it plays host to 2 of Syracuse University's major men's sports programs. The football program plays in the 49,250-seat stadium, but the Orangemen are known for their excellence on the basketball court. With such a massive stadium, the basketball fans are large in numbers and as loud as can be, making the Carrier Dome one of the toughest places for any opponent.
960 1280

Flicker - John Marino  

Allen Fieldhouse

Allen Fieldhouse

Phog Allen Fieldhouse - University of Kansas
You can find tradition nearly everywhere inside Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence, KS. Need proof? The Kansas Jayhawks play their home games on James Naismith Court, the inventor of basketball. With the second most wins in men's college basketball history, Rock Chalk Nation cheers loud but chants even louder.
960 1280

Getty Images  

Bud Walton Arena

Bud Walton Arena

Bud Walton Arena - University of Arkansas
The "Basketball Palace of Mid-America" resides in Fayetteville, AR, and is home to the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. One of the newer stadiums on our list, Bud Walton Arena was constructed in 1993. Its history was cemented in the arena's inaugural season as the men's team won the national championship.
960 1280

Getty Images  

University Arena

University Arena

University Arena - University of New Mexico
The Pit, formerly known as University Arena, is one of the loudest arenas in all of college basketball. You can hear the 15,000-plus fans howling, as the University of New Mexico Lobos duke it out on Bob King Court in Albuquerque, NM.
960 1280

Wikimedia - PerryPlanet  

Gallagher IBA Arena

Gallagher IBA Arena

Gallagher-IBA Arena - Oklahoma State University
Located in Stillwater, OK, Gallagher-Iba Arena is home to Oklahoma State's Cowboys. Built in 1938, Gallagher-Iba Arena still has its original maple floors, and is known by many as "The Rowdiest Arena in the Country."
960 1280

OSU Marketing - Phil Shockley  

Memorial Gym

Memorial Gym

Memorial Gym - Vanderbilt University
Probably the most unique stadium in all of college basketball belongs to Vanderbilt University. Memorial Gym in Nashville, TN, features the team benches on opposite ends rather than sides, along with a cinematic, triple-deck structure. Memorial Gym is said to give the Commodores home court advantage because of its unusual design, making it one of the most difficult places for opposing teams to come away with a win.
960 1280

Getty Images  

Maples Pavilion

Maples Pavilion

Maples Pavilion - Stanford University
Known for the Sixth Man, the raucous student section of Cardinal fans, Maples Pavilion has become one of the most notorious venues on the West Coast. With fans sitting just inches from the court, opposing teams face a difficult task every time they travel to Stanford, CA.
960 1280

Standford Athletics  

Pauley Pavilion

Pauley Pavilion

Pauley Pavilion - University of California Los Angeles
When it comes to Los Angeles basketball, most people think of the Lakers. But rivaling the recent success in their home stadium, the Staples Center, is Pauley Pavilion, the home of the UCLA Bruins. LA is known for its flash, and in classic LA fashion, Pauley Pavilion has seen its share of superstars. With the "Wizard of Westwood" John Wooden coaching such legends as Lew Alcinder (aka Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) and Bill Walton, and owning the most national championships in men's college basketball history, it's clear why the Pavilion made our sweet 16.
960 1280

Getty Images  

Cameron Indoor Stadium

Cameron Indoor Stadium

Cameron Indoor Stadium - Duke University
One of the most historic basketball venues in the country also happens to be one of the smallest. Home of the Duke Blue Devils, and only seating 9,314, Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, NC, is known as one of the most electric stadiums in all of basketball. There have been many legendary coaches in college basketball but perhaps none more than the court's namesake, Mike Krzyzewski, or as he's known by most fans, simply "Coach K."
960 1280

Getty Images  

Smith Spectrum

Smith Spectrum

Smith Spectrum - Utah State University
If you're trying to concentrate, the Smith Spectrum, home of the Utah State Aggies, is the last place you want to be. Over the past decade, the spectrum has gained a reputation as one of the toughest venues for opposing teams due to its disturbingly loud student section. Located in Logan, UT, the Smith Spectrum has a seating capacity of 10,270.
960 1280

USU Public Relations & Marketing  

The Palestra

The Palestra

The Palestra - University of Pennsylvania
When you think of top college basketball venues, you think of the big programs that have been dominant for decades. But the "Cathedral of College Basketball" belongs to the Quakers of the University of Pennsylvania. Located in Philadelphia, the Palestra opened in 1927 and has a capacity of 8,722.
960 1280

Penn Athletics  

The Dean Dome

The Dean Dome

The Dean Dome - University of North Carolina
Just down "Tobacco Road" from Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) rival Duke University, the University of North Carolina Tar Heels play their home games in Chapel Hill, NC, at the Smith Center, better known as the Dean Dome. With jerseys once worn by the likes of Michael Jordan, James Worthy and Bob McAdoo hanging from the rafters, there's no doubt that the Dean Dome is one of the most historic venues in all of college basketball.
960 1280

Getty Images  

Hinkle Fieldhouse - Butler University
Home to the Butler Bulldogs men's basketball team, Hinkle Fieldhouse, which was built in 1928 and renamed in 1966 after Paul D. Hinkle, is one of the oldest college basketball stadiums still in use. The fieldhouse is also a US national historic landmark.
960 1280

Brent Smith / Butler University  

960 1280

  

Assembly Hall

Assembly Hall

Assembly Hall - Indiana University
The Hoosiers may have been up and down on the court for the past decade, but that can’t erase their incredible history in Assembly Hall. Over an 11-year span from 1976 to 1987, legendary coach Bob Knight led the Hoosiers to 3 national championships, including a perfect season in '76. And who can forget the moment Bob lost his temper and hurled a chair across the court against Purdue in '85? Moments like these, good and bad, have created a special environment for Hoosier fans in Bloomington, IN.
960 1280

IU Athletics  

Venue vs. Venue

Venue vs. Venue

Named after legendary head coach Adolph Rupp, Rupp Arena in downtown Lexington, KY, is the largest stadium built specifically for basketball in the United States. Built in the middle of Lexington Center -- a convention and shopping facility -- Rupp Arena holds more the 24,000 people. With arguably the most passionate fans in college basketball, they don't get wilder than the fans of Big Blue Nation. 960 1280

Andy Lyons  

Venue vs. Venue

Venue vs. Venue

The University of Connecticut men's basketball team is unique in the fact that it plays its home games at 2 different arenas: The XL center in Hartford and Gampel Pavilion (pictured above), located on UConn's campus. 960 1280

  

Campus vs. Campus

Campus vs. Campus

Housing just over 29,000 students, the University of Kentucky in Lexington is the largest college in the state. The William T. Young Library (pictured above) is just one of the 15 libraries on campus. 960 1280

  

Campus vs. Campus

Campus vs. Campus

Home to over 28,000 students, the university's main campus is located in Storrs, CT. This public research university is just 28 miles outside of the state's capital, Hartford. 960 1280

Denis Jr. Tangney  

Landmark vs. Landmark

Landmark vs. Landmark

From equestrian events to parades showcasing rare breeds of horses, the Kentucky Horse Park is the leading tourist attraction for all things "horse" in the world. Boasting over 1,220 acres of rolling greens and hundreds of beautiful horses, the park gives Lexington its nickname, The Horse Capital of the World. 960 1280

  

Landmark vs. Landmark

Landmark vs. Landmark

The Mark Twain house, located in Hartford, is one of the more historic landmarks in Connecticut. His major works, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Prince and the Pauper and Huckleberry Finn, were written while Twain resided in this home. 960 1280

  

Iconic Food or Drink vs. Iconic Food or Drink

Iconic Food or Drink vs. Iconic Food or Drink

The Woodford Reserve is one of many bourbon distilleries located in and around Lexington, KY. According to the Kentucky Distillers Association, 95% of bourbon, America's only native spirit, is produced in Kentucky. 960 1280

  

Iconic Food or Drink vs. Iconic Food or Drink

Iconic Food or Drink vs. Iconic Food or Drink

At the UConn Dairy Bar, ice cream is more then just a frozen delicacy. Order their fresh, homemade ice cream inside, then take a walk out back to Horsebarn Hill to see the cow that made it all possible. 960 1280

  

Sports Bar vs. Sports Bar

Sports Bar vs. Sports Bar

If you couldn't get tickets to the big game with the rest of your Big Blue Nation companions, then head to the Shamrock Bar & Grille. With wall-to-wall TVs and the best bar food in the area, come cheer on your Wildcats like only Kentuckians know how … loud and proud! 960 1280

  

Sports Bar vs. Sports Bar

Sports Bar vs. Sports Bar

Located within the Nathan Hale Inn on the University of Connecticut's campus, the True Blue Tavern is the perfect spot to relax after a long day and catch the Huskies doing what they do best: play basketball. With top-notch food and a championship basketball display that would put most sports bar to shame, there is no better place to catch a game in Storrs. 960 1280

  

The Hot List

Explore America’s most stunning scenery.
Join the conversation on Social Media!
Stay updated on the latest travel tips and trends.
Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.