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Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

Landmark vs. Landmark
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor.
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Thinkstock  

Landmark vs. Landmark

Landmark vs. Landmark

Paul Revere Statue
The Paul Revere statue outside of the Old North Church in Boston’s North End, where the famous "1 if by land, and 2 if by sea" signal was sent.
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Thinkstock  

Lincoln Tunnel

Lincoln Tunnel

Driving Challenge vs. Driving Challenge
The Lincoln Tunnel, which connects New Jersey to Manhattan, is notorious for traffic backups.
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Matthew Rutledge - Flickr  

Driving Challenge vs. Driving Challenge

Driving Challenge vs. Driving Challenge

One-Way Streets
Boston’s narrow 1-way streets often make it difficult to maneuver your way across town.
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Thinkstock  

New York Style

New York Style

Food vs. Food
New York-style, thin-crust pizza.
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Thinkstock  

Food vs. Food

Food vs. Food

Clam Chowder
Boston is known for having some of the best clam chowder in New England.
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Thinkstock  

Guggenheim Museum

Guggenheim Museum

Museum vs. Museum
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.
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Vincent Desjardins - Flickr  

Museum vs. Museum

Museum vs. Museum

Boston's Museum of Fine Arts
With more than 450,000 works of art, Boston's Museum of Fine Arts is one of the largest museums in the United States. Attracting more than 1 million visitors per year, this museum is one of the most visited art museums in the world.
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Smart Destinations - Flickr  

Fifth Avenue

Fifth Avenue

Shopping vs. Shopping
Lined with upscale shops, Fifth Avenue in Manhattan is one of the most expensive shopping destinations in the world.
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Jose M Izquierdo Galiot - Flickr  

Shopping vs. Shopping

Shopping vs. Shopping

Newbury Street
Located in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood, Newbury Street has been a trendy shopping spot for Bostonians since the late 1970s.
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Francisco Seoane Perez - Flickr  

The Subway

The Subway

Transportation vs. Transportation
The NYC subway.
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Harmon - Flickr  

Transportation vs. Transportation

Transportation vs. Transportation

The T
Boston’s MBTA, better known as The T.
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Adam E. Moreira - Wikimedia commons  

Central Park

Central Park

Park vs. Park
A city landmark since 1857, Central Park is located in, you guessed it, the center of Manhattan.
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Thinkstock  

Park vs. Park

Park vs. Park

Boston Common
Going all the way back to 1634, the Boston Common is the oldest city park in the United States. It consists of 50 acres of land, including the famous “Emerald Necklace” of parks that extends from Common south to Roxbury.
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Thinkstock  

Metlife Stadium

Metlife Stadium

Stadium vs. Stadium
Metlife Stadium, also known as New Meadowlands, is actually located outside of NYC -- in East Rutherford, NJ.
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Getty Images  

Gillette Stadium

Gillette Stadium

Stadium vs. Stadium
Gillette Stadium is located outside of Boston in nearby Foxborough, MA.
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Bernard Gagnon - Wikimedia Commons  

Meatpacking District

Meatpacking District

Nightlife vs. Nightlife
The Meatpacking District is known by many as one of the more trendy or "hip" places in New York City for after-dark fun. Places such as club Tenjune, located beneath the upscale restaurant STK, and Plunge, at the Hotel Gansevoort, create endless buzz and good times.
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Getty Images  

Lansdowne Street

Lansdowne Street

Nightlife vs. Nightlife
Located right next to Fenway Park, Lansdowne Street has something for every sun-down socializer. Take in a show at the House of Blues; have a pint at Lansdowne Pub; or catch a Sox game from Bleacher Bar.
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Meg Lessard - Flickr  

Photos

FIFA Women's World Cup 2015

FIFA Women's World Cup 2015

US soccer player Ali Krieger is caught in action during a match between the United States and Sweden at Winnipeg Stadium in Manitoba, Canada, during the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. 960 1280

Adam Pretty/FIFA/Getty Images  

Girls' Soccer Match in Canada

Girls' Soccer Match in Canada

A girls' soccer team plays a friendly match on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, to celebrate the Women's World Cup soccer tournament coming to Canada. Ottawa is be one of the cities to host the tournament.
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Reuters  

Winnipeg, Manitoba

Winnipeg, Manitoba

The Provencher Bridge crosses the Red River in Winnipeg, Manitoba, one of the host cities for the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup in Canada. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Edmonton, Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta, is one of the host cities for the 2015 Women’s World Cup.
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Thinkstock  

Olympic Stadium in Montreal

Olympic Stadium in Montreal

Built as the main venue for the 1976 Summer Olympics, Olympic Stadium in Montreal is one of the stadiums to host the 2015 Women’s World Cup. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Moncton, New Brunswick

Moncton, New Brunswick

The riverfront city of Moncton, New Brunswick — which is nicknamed Hub City because of its central location — is one of the cities to host the 2015 Women’s World Cup in Canada. 960 1280

Bhobolens, flickr  

BC Place in Vancouver

BC Place in Vancouver

The world’s largest air-supported stadium, BC Place, located in Vancouver, British Columbia, is a venue that will host the Women’s World Cup in 2015. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Russia: FIFA Men's World Cup 2018

Russia: FIFA Men's World Cup 2018

Members of the Russian delegation celebrate at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, after the official announcement that their country will host the 2018 World Cup. 960 1280

Sebastian Derungs/AFP/Getty Images  

Russia vs. Slovenia

Russia vs. Slovenia

Russia's Andrei Arshavin, right, vies with Slovenia's Bojan Jokic during their World Cup 2010 qualifying playoff match in Maribor, Slovenia. 960 1280

Hrvoje Polan/AFP/Getty Images  

Luzhniki Stadium

Luzhniki Stadium

Moscow's Luzhniki Stadium was built in 1956 and boasts a 5-star rating from the Union of European Football Associations. Its makeover in preparation for the 2018 World Cup will take its seating capacity to roughly 89,000. 960 1280

Danita Delimont/Gallo Images/Getty Images  

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 (France)

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 (France)

Soccer players and fans will be able to get a beautiful view of the Saone River in Lyon, France, when the city hosts the opening and closing games for the Women’s World Cup in 2019. 960 1280

Frederic Prochasson/iStock/Getty Images  

Stade de France

Stade de France

Located in Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Stade de France may be one of the stadiums to which hundreds of fans will flock to see the Women’s World Cup in 2019. 960 1280

Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images  

MMArena

MMArena

Although the official list of venues has not been chosen yet, the MMArena in Le Mans, France, may be on the short list to host Women’s World Cup matches in 2019. Opened in 2011, the fairly new stadium can hold up to 25,000 spectators for soccer games. 960 1280

Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images  

Qatar: FIFA Men's World Cup 2022

Qatar: FIFA Men's World Cup 2022

FIFA President Sepp Blatter announces Qatar as the host nation for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. The United States, which was considered a front-runner, finished second in the voting. 960 1280

Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images  

Al-Wakrah Stadium (model)

Al-Wakrah Stadium (model)

Qatar presents a model of its Al-Wakrah Stadium before winning the chance to host the 2022 World Cup. The stadium model was revealed during the FIFA Inspection Tour for the country's bid in Doha. 960 1280

Karim Jaafar/AFP/Getty Images  

Joyous Reaction in Qatar

Joyous Reaction in Qatar

The chairman of the Qatar 2022 bid committee, Sheikh Mohammed bin Hamad al-Thani, and other bystanders cheer as Qatar is chosen to host the 2022 World Cup.   960 1280

Sebastian Derungs/AFP/Getty Images  

Doha's West Bay

Doha's West Bay

The skyline of the West Bay central financial district in Doha, Qatar, comes to life at night.
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Gavin Hellier/AWL Images/Getty Images  

Qatar vs. Japan

Qatar vs. Japan

Japan's Shinji Okazaki fights for the ball with Qatar's Ibrahim Majed, right, during their 2010 World Cup qualifying soccer match in Yokohama, Japan. 960 1280

Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images  

Stadium

Stadium

Located on Russell Street, the M&T Bank Stadium is home to the Baltimore Ravens. The stadium’s capacity is large enough to hold 71,004 fans. And just in case you didn’t know, the Ravens head into the Super Bowl with 10 wins and 6 losses for the 2012 NFL regular season. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Candlestick Park

Candlestick Park

In comparison, San Francisco’s Candlestick Park, home to the 49ers, has a seating capacity of 69,843. After winning 11 games and losing 4 during the 2012 NFL regular season, the 49ers are now preparing for their big game against the Baltimore Ravens. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Military Site

Military Site

Baltimore’s Fort McHenry is best known for successfully defending Baltimore Harbor against a British navy attack during the War of 1812. It was during the attack that Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the poem that would eventually become the US national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” 960 1280

National Park Service  

Presidio

Presidio

In 1776, the Presidio started out as a military base, but it would close its doors as an active base in 1989 as part of a military reduction program. Now a public park, the Presidio has wooded hills and the best panoramic views of the Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco Bridge and the Pacific Ocean. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Crab

Crab

In Baltimore, nothing beats delicious soft blue crabs, served up at dozens of local restaurants, including Schultz’s Crab House, Crab Shanty and Mariner’s Landing. 960 1280

istock  

Dungeness Crabs

Dungeness Crabs

And in San Francisco, who can deny the incredibly fresh taste of Dungeness crabs at Anchor Oyster Bar, Crazy Crab’z, Sotto Mare and other local restaurants. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Waterfront

Waterfront

Both cities have great harbors. Baltimore’s Inner Harbor is the site of the National Aquarium, Sports Legends at Camden Yards and, just a few blocks away, Port Discovery Children’s Museum. Shop until you drop at Harborplace and the Gallery, and end your shopping spree with a casual walk along the picturesque waterfront. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Fisherman's Wharf

Fisherman's Wharf

In San Francisco, Fisherman’s Wharf is home to dozens of restaurants, bars and shops sure to keep any tourist busy. A variety of boat charters and bay cruises begin at the wharf, including boat tours to Alcatraz Island. The Aquarium of the Bay, Ghirardelli Square, Pier 39 and Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Museum are just a few tourist attractions located nearby, and we’d be remiss to not mention the crowds that stand around to watch the street performers and sunbathing sea lions. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Art Museum

Art Museum

Located in Baltimore’s Federal Hill neighborhood, the American Visionary Art Museum showcases original works of art created by self-taught artists. The museum comprises 3 renovated historic industrial buildings and sculpture gardens; all create the “un-museumy” atmosphere to display works by visionary artists, including Ho Baron, Nek Chand, Ted Gordon and Leo Sewell. 960 1280

Paul Burk  

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Founded in 1935, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art was the first museum on the West Coast devoted to modern and contemporary art. From modern masters to younger, less established artists, more than 27,000 works of art are on display. Visitors can take a self-guided tour, as well as watch video screenings, view interactive kiosks or participate in public programs to learn more about modern art. 960 1280

Jamie McCaffrey, flickr  

Most Popular Attraction

Most Popular Attraction

The National Aquarium is the most popular tourist destination in Baltimore. In 2003, aquariums in Baltimore and Washington DC, joined forces to become one National Aquarium; today, the facility showcases living collections of more than 16,000 animals, from more than 660 species of fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals, all living in a makeshift natural habitat. 960 1280

National Aquarium ©  

Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

In San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge is the most popular tourist attraction in the City by the Bay. The famous bridge was named after the Golden Gate Strait -- the entrance to San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. As of May 2012, almost 2 million vehicles had crossed the Golden Gate Bridge since opening to traffic on May 28, 1937. 960 1280

Thinkstock  

Historic Neighborhood

Historic Neighborhood

Welcome to Fell’s Point, a Baltimore neighborhood and historic district once populated by a large number of Polish and Irish immigrants. The waterfront community is home to a variety of shops, restaurants, coffee bars, music stores and the highest concentration of pubs in the city -- more than 120. 960 1280

duluoz cats, flickr  

North Beach, San Francisco

North Beach, San Francisco

The American Planning Association has named San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood one of 10 “Great Neighborhoods in America.” Also known as Little Italy, the area has historically been home to a large Italian-American population. It was also the historic center of the 1950s beatnik literary movement. Today the neighborhood is populated by young professionals, families and Chinese immigrants. 960 1280

Alfonso Jimenez, flickr  

Light Rail

Light Rail

One option for getting around Baltimore is the city’s light-rail system; it has a few main routes, including one that runs from Penn Station to Camden Yards. 960 1280

Gregory Wass, flickr  

Muni

Muni

Out on the West Coast, the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni), is one of America’s oldest public transit agencies. Today it carries over 200 million customers per year. Unlike Baltimore’s limited light-rail service, the Muni runs 24 hours, 7 days a week. 960 1280

Prayitno, flickr  

Familiar Sign

Familiar Sign

It really isn’t a competition, but we thought we’d throw in a couple famous signs that most people will be familiar with after visiting the 2 Super Bowl cities. Like this, for example: Take a quick glance at Baltimore’s skyline and you’ll notice the Domino Sugars sign atop the company’s plant. 960 1280

Mr. T in DC, flickr   

The Castro Sign

The Castro Sign

Although it doesn’t light up San Fran’s skyline, the famous Castro sign does light up the neighborhood. The Castro was one of America’s first and largest gay neighborhoods. 960 1280

Ludovic Bertron, flickr  

Best Food

Best Food

In comparing neighborhoods, Baltimore’s Little Italy is known for its authentic Italian food served at more than 30 restaurants, nestled between the Inner Harbor and historic Fell’s Point neighborhood. 960 1280

Daniel Lobo, flickr  

Chinatown, San Francisco

Chinatown, San Francisco

We could compare Baltimore’s Little Italy to San Francisco’s Little Italy, but we decided to go in a different direction. We opted instead to highlight San Fran’s Chinatown, where authentic Chinese food is served at restaurants like Golden Gate Bakery, Hunan Home’s Restaurant and Wing Sing. 960 1280

Thomas Hawk, flickr  

Motorcycle Maddness hits Daytona Beach during Bike Week, a gathering of motorcycle riders and fans from all over the world. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Daytona Bike Week also called Daytona Beach Bike Week, is a motorcycle event and rally held annually in Daytona Beach, FL. Approximately 500,000 people make their way to the rally area for the 10-day event. The festivities include motorcycle racing, concerts, parties, and street festivals. 960 1280

Getty Images  

Only motorcycles are allowed to drive along this stretch of Main Street during the first three days of Bike Week in Daytona Beach, FL. The event is usually held on the first full week of March and contends with the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally as the most popular motorcycle rally in the United States. 960 1280

Getty Images  

The Sturgis Rally in South Dakota is one of the biggest motorcycle rallies in the US, with concerts, exhibits and, of course, thousands of bikers riding and racing with fellow motorcycle enthusiasts. 960 1280

Sturgis.com  

Racer John Cluzel strives to hit top speed at the Red Bull Indianapolis GP Motocross at the Indianapolis Speedway. 960 1280

Shawn Gritzmacher  

The strongest competitors gather at the podium at the Red Bull Indianapolis GP Motocross, including Pol Espargaro, Nicolas Terol and Sandro Cortess. 960 1280

Ron McQueeney  

Thousands of riders rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, at Rolling Thunder held each year on Memorial Day weekend to honor American veterans. 960 1280

Reuters  

Riders cross the Potomac River via the Memorial Bridge to head to Washington's Rolling Thunder. 960 1280

Reuters  

The Cannonball Bike Run brings together riders, known as Cannonballers, for 6 days of fast riding and partying on super high-performance bikes. 960 1280

Cannonball Bike Run  

Rallies are a time for bikers to meet up and ride together with other motorcycle enthusiasts and explore new terrain. 960 1280

American Motorcycle Association {www.americanmotorcyclist.com}  

The Harley Love Ride heads up San Fernando Road in Glendale, California. 960 1280

Simon Cherpitel / Love Ride Foundation  

Bikers' favorite, the Harley Love Ride, was cancelled in 2009-2010, but organizers promise it will be back again in 2011, drawing riders to southern California. 960 1280

Erin Null / Love Ride Foundation  

Concours d'Elegance 960 1280

Concours d'Elegance  

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