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X Marks the Spot

When it comes to searching for treasure, the hunt is half the fun. Maybe you’ll unearth gold or silver. Maybe you’ll find an important piece of history. Or maybe you’ll discover that there’s something far more valuable — great memories of the travel experience.

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Digging at Fort St. Philip
Digging at Fort St. Philip

Digging at Fort St. Philip

The relic hunters of Dig Wars head down the Mississippi River to Fort Saint Philip, where they hope to dig up treasures from as early as the 18th century. Teammates Mark and Ron quickly duck out of sight in an attempt to distance themselves from the others. 960 1280

  

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Mark Slinkman and Ron Guinazzo head for the beach where they believe Hurricane Katrina has unearthed fresh ground. 960 1280

  

Fort St. Philip, Louisiana

Fort St. Philip, Louisiana

Fort Saint Philip hasn’t been open to the public since Hurricane Katrina. The powerful storm altered the landscape of the fort, and the hunters hope it also uncovered rare relics from the past. 960 1280

  

War of 1812 and the Civil War at Fort St. Philip

War of 1812 and the Civil War at Fort St. Philip

Home to important battles in both the War of 1812 and the Civil War, Fort Saint Phillip is loaded with history. It was initially developed by the French in the mid-1700s and was later controlled by the Spanish. Here, Larry puts a find in his apron. 960 1280

  

Finding artifacts at Fort St. Philip

Finding artifacts at Fort St. Philip

Mark Slinkman inspects a find. 960 1280

  

Searching for artifacts at Fort St. Philip

Searching for artifacts at Fort St. Philip

Larry and Mike head north where they hope to find souvenirs from the time of the French and Spanish. 960 1280

  

Fort St. Philip, Louisiana

Fort St. Philip, Louisiana

The relic hunters stumble upon an animal skull at Fort Saint Philip. 960 1280

  

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Josh and Abby Silva decide to head directly into the fort and dig along the walls. 960 1280

  

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Josh and Abby inspect one of their finds. 960 1280

  

Digging at Fort St. Philip

Digging at Fort St. Philip

The husband-and-wife duo celebrates a great find. 960 1280

  

Casell Gallery New Orleans

Casell Gallery New Orleans

Ron Guinazzo and Mark Slinkman show their discoveries to appraiser Joe Wyman at Casell Gallery in New Orleans. 960 1280

  

Appraising an artifact

Appraising an artifact

How much will Abby and Josh’s artifact be worth? Tune in to find out! 960 1280

  

Ron, Bernie and Diane
Ron, Bernie and Diane

Ron, Bernie and Diane

Gem hunter Ron LeBlanc travels to Madagascar with his 2 most trusted specialists: geologist Bernie Gaboury and jewelry maven Diane Robinson. 960 1280

  

Pink sapphires

Pink sapphires

Ron negotiates for a parcel of pink sapphires in Madagascar’s market village of Ibitzi. 960 1280

  

Purchasing gems

Purchasing gems

Diane, Ron and Bernie buy gems from local dealers in Ibitzi. The gem hunters are forced to use all their skill, cunning and guile to outsmart the local gem dealers who are often swindlers. 960 1280

  

Gem hunters

Gem hunters

The gem hunters take a break in the village of Ibitzi. 960 1280

  

Ibitzi

Ibitzi

Bernie and Ron walk the streets of Ibitzi. Local gem dealers know Ron well, and often stop him on the street to try to make a deal. 960 1280

  

Diane poses with a Chameleon

Diane poses with a Chameleon

Diane poses with a Chameleon on the side of the road during their trip from the city of Toliara to the gem mines of Ilakaka. 960 1280

  

Gem Mines of Ilakaka

Gem Mines of Ilakaka

Ron and his crew travel to the notorious gem mines of Ilakaka to watch workers hunt for gemstones. Finding a large stone is an extreme rarity. 960 1280

  

Madagascar

Madagascar

After purchasing pink sapphires in Ibitzi, Ron, Diane and Bernie travel the island of Madagascar in search of the perfect piece of aquamarine. 960 1280

  

Ron examines a gem

Ron examines a gem

Ron, a geologist, is a pro at spotting synthetic gemstones. 960 1280

  

Aquamarine

Aquamarine

The gem hunters get more than they bargained for when smugglers and a government agent offer them a $700,000 piece of aquamarine that is about to be whisked out of the country. 960 1280

  

Ron holds a large gem

Ron holds a large gem

Ron holds a large gem after it’s been cut. 960 1280

  

Malagasy ariary

Malagasy ariary

Ron has $20,000 to spend on gemstones, which he turns into 17 million Malagasy ariary, the local currency. It’s a black-market country so Ron cuts his deal for cash in an alleyway. 960 1280

  

Pink sapphires

Pink sapphires

Diane examines a pink sapphire. 960 1280

  

Josh and Abby Silva gear up to dig at Antietam Overlook, near the site of the bloodiest day of the Civil War. The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862 and marked the end of General Robert E. Lee’s first invasion of the North. 960 1280

  

Antietam Overlook

Antietam Overlook

The teams arrive at the Antietam Overlook Farm where the temperatures have dropped and the hard, frozen ground is covered in snow, which makes relic hunting more difficult than usual. 960 1280

  

Dig Wars equipment

Dig Wars equipment

The teams have all kinds of digging equipment at the ready! 960 1280

  

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Antietam

The day after the Battle of Antietam, General Lee’s forces retreated to the South. This strategic victory gave Abraham Lincoln the confidence to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. 960 1280

  

Georgia Landing
Georgia Landing

Georgia Landing

Ron Guinazzo and Mark Slinkman gear up for a day of digging at Georgia Landing, a sugar cane plantation that has just opened to the public for the first time in years. 960 1280

  

Battle of Georgia Landing

Battle of Georgia Landing

Located in Labadieville, LA, Georgia Landing was the site of an important battle during the American Civil War. In hopes of gaining control of this strategic location on the bayou, Union forces descended on the Confederate soldiers in October 1862. 960 1280

  

Georgia Landing

Georgia Landing

Because of the Union forces’ superior numbers, they were able to oust the Confederates after they ran out of ammunition. 960 1280

  

Digging at Georgia Landing

Digging at Georgia Landing

Larry Cissna and Mike Scott heading out to the site of the battle in search of relics. 960 1280

  

Relic hunting in Georgia

Relic hunting in Georgia

Mark and Ron, relic-hunting novices, use a different strategy, and set out in search of the old trading post. 960 1280

  

Relic hunting in Louisiana

Relic hunting in Louisiana

The relic hunters won’t let any obstacles get in the way of a good find! Josh helps Abby as she attempts to climb through a barbed-wire fence. 960 1280

  

Digging relics at Georgia Landing

Digging relics at Georgia Landing

Josh thinks he’s found something! Typically at these historic battlefields, the relic hunters come across buttons, coins and bullets. 960 1280

  

Digging relics at Georgia Landing

Digging relics at Georgia Landing

Ron Guinazzo and Mark Slinkman decide to “bottom-feed” on Josh and Abby’s section of the property, where they pick up an item that could be worth $10,000. 960 1280

  

The Hope Diamond
The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond

Named after rich London banker Thomas Hope, this gem has been owned by royalty in France, Britain and Turkey, as well collectors in the UK and the US. The Hope Diamond was cut from The Blue Diamond of the Crown of France, a gem that was smuggled to London during the French Revolution. The “French Blue” was itself cut from the Tavernier Blue, a huge rough diamond that mysteriously made its way to France from India in the late 17th century. 960 1280

REUTERS/Jason Reed  

The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond

Most of the Hope Diamond’s owners have suffered misfortune, and it changed hands often in settlement of debts. This led to the legend of the Hope Diamond Curse. In 1958, diamond merchant Harry Winston was persuaded to donate it to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where it’s now on display. I have had the pleasure of viewing this marvellous gem there. 960 1280

Dennis Brack/Bloomberg News  

Koh-i-Noor

Koh-i-Noor

This gem was said to have gained its name -- meaning "Mountain of Lights" -- after an exclamation by its owner, the Shah of Iran, in 1739. But the Shah was only one of many owners: since some time in the 13th century -- when it emerged from a mine in Andhra Pradesh -- the diamond went from country to country, changing hands as a spoil of war. 960 1280

STR/AFP/Getty Images  

Koh-i-Noor

Koh-i-Noor

Ownership last changed in 1839 as the British took possession of the Punjab. The diamond was taken to London and presented to Queen Victoria. After her death, it was set into the crown worn by the consort of the Monarch of the UK, and can be seen today as part of the Crown Jewels. Kate Middleton is next in line to wear it. Descendants of many former owners claim ownership of the gem, including India and the Taliban. 960 1280

Tim Graham/Getty Images  

The Black Prince’s Ruby

The Black Prince’s Ruby

The gem’s origin is thought to be a mine in what is now Tajikistan. During the middle of the 14th century, it was owned by Abū Sa'īd, the Moorish Prince of Granada, who was murdered by Don Pedro the Cruel. Don Pedro took the jewel, but was obliged to give it to the Black Prince, son of Edward III of England, in return for help to put down a revolt. Technically, it’s not a ruby but a spinel, which is now considered different, since it is not quite as dense or hard as a "true ruby." The Black Prince’s "Ruby" is uncut, but polished, and is about the size of a chicken’s egg. 960 1280

Royal Collection Trust  

The Black Prince’s Ruby

The Black Prince’s Ruby

At the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 Henry V of England, who wore the gem on a jewel-encrusted helmet in battle, nearly lost the gem, the helmet and his head when the French Duke of Alençon struck him. When Oliver Cromwell defeated the British monarchy, he had the crown jewels melted down, and the gem was sold. It was bought back after the monarchy was restored and was set the Imperial State Crown. Today, it may be seen displayed with the Crown Jewels. 960 1280

Archive Photos/Getty Images  

Star of India

Star of India

This is one of the largest star sapphires in the world, and the most famous. Light bouncing from the mineral rutile, which is included in the stone, forms a star pattern. The size of a golf ball, the gem has been polished to the shape of a dome to enhance the star’s beauty. 960 1280

Daniel Torres via Wikimedia Commons  

Star of India

Star of India

The gem was donated to the American Museum of Natural History in 1900 by financier J. P. Morgan. In 1964, it was stolen from the museum along with other famous jewels, including the Midnight Star, the DeLong Star Ruby, and the Eagle Diamond. The gems were later recovered from a locker in a Miami bus station, except for the Eagle Diamond, which was never seen again. 960 1280

George P. Hall & Son/George Eastman House/Getty Images  

Pearl of Lao Tzu

Pearl of Lao Tzu

This pearl -- the largest known pearl in the world -- was discovered by a Filipino diver; then acquired by American Wilburn Cobb in the Philippines in the 1930s. It was previously known as the Pearl of Allah, because of its resemblance to a turban. When Cobb died in 1979, Peter Hoffman and Victor Barbish bought the pearl, using some money borrowed from Joseph Bonicelli. Today, the gem is owned equally by heirs of these 3 men, and is not on public display. 960 1280

I, Drow male via Wikimedia Commons  

The Andamooka Opal

The Andamooka Opal

Discovered in 1949, the Andamooka Opal is said to be the finest opal ever discovered. It’s particularly praised for its size (203 carats) and the depth and vibrancy of its colors. 960 1280

Royal Collection/AAP Newswire  

The Medusa Emerald

The Medusa Emerald

This gem was uncovered from the Kagem mine in Zambia in 2008 by a gemstone mining company. It was sent to the US where quartz that surrounded the emerald was removed, millimetre by millimetre, to reveal the long, thin emerald crystals. 960 1280

Natural History Museum in London  

The Andamooka Opal

The Andamooka Opal

The gem was set into a diamond necklace and presented, along with matching earrings, to the new Queen Elizabeth II on behalf of the people of South Australia at a state banquet in Adelaide in March 1954. 960 1280

Paul Gilham/Getty Images  

The Medusa Emerald

The Medusa Emerald

The gem has recently been on display at the Vault in British Natural History Museum. 960 1280

Mark Mawson/ Getty Images  

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