Miso-Glazed Black Cod

Watch Andrew Zimmern Prepare this Japanese Dish

Video: Make Andrew's Japanese Cod

This dish features delicate black cod infused with rich sake and miso.

Make Andrew's Japanese Cod

 02:53

This dish features delicate black cod infused with rich sake and miso.

Not since blackened redfish jumped out of Paul Prudhomme's universe onto the international stage have so many been fascinated by one simple easy technique.

You will enjoy making and eating this dish inspired by Nobu Matsuhisa's version of this Japanese classic.

Serves 6-8 persons as a main course

Ingredients

1 qt. plus 1 cup water

2 tbs. kosher salt

3 lbs. black cod filet (sable fish) cut into 8 portions, skin on preferably. In a pinch you can use fresh Chilean sea bass instead. It does work well with salmon also.

1 lb. kasu* aka fermented sake lees (the sedimentary by-product from rice-wine production)

1/2 cup brown sugar

2-3 tbs. miso

1/4 cup mirin

Directions

Combine the quart of water and the salt.

Add the cod, and soak in the refrigerator for 45 minutes.

Remove fish, discard water and dry the fish gently.

In a work bowl, combine the remaining ingredients.

Add the fish and marinate. Cover and place in the fridge for a minimum of 24 hours but up to 2 days.

Preheat broiler and remove fish from marinade.

Place the fish on a non-stick broiler tray, and broil for 10 minutes for every inch of thickness roughly 4-6 inches from the heat source.

Turn once carefully. Do not burn the fish.

Serve immediately.

*Available from Mutual Fish (206) 322-4368

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