Booze Traveler: Around the World Pictures

Check out pictures from Jack Maxwell's journey during Season 2 of Booze Traveler.

Photos

Wagon

Wagon

Riding in the back of a wagon in the city outskirts in Hungary. Their preferred method of transportation. 960 1280

  

Acropolis

Acropolis

The theater at the Acropolis in Athens. 960 1280

  

Booze Crew

Booze Crew

The Booze Traveler crew in Manila, Philippines. 960 1280

  

Arctic Circle

Arctic Circle

Well, no going back now … 960 1280

  

Bridge of Death

Bridge of Death

Walking across the so-called “bridge of death” in the Philippines. 960 1280

  

Bugatti

Bugatti

In a 1929 Bugatti. A pretty good way to see Sicily, Italy! 960 1280

  

Chocolates

Chocolates

Making chocolates in Savannah. Yes, we are adding liquor to them. 960 1280

  

Cow's Blood

Cow's Blood

Drinking cow's blood with the Maasai in Tanzania can get a little messy. 960 1280

  

Dive Bar

Dive Bar

Tanzania, Africa. I like dive bars, but ... ;-) 960 1280

  

Drinkin' and Fishin'

Drinkin' and Fishin'

Drinkin' and fishin' in the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia. Well, I'm drinkin' and they're fishin'. I mean, the show is called Booze Traveler! 960 1280

  

Female Impersonator

Female Impersonator

At a female impersonator show in Savannah. This is all I can show you. ;-) 960 1280

  

Gypsy Dance

Gypsy Dance

Dancing with Hungarian gypsies. 960 1280

  

Hobbiton

Hobbiton

Walking through the Shire in Hobbiton, New Zealand. 960 1280

  

Hungarian Feast

Hungarian Feast

Lunch the Hungarian way — a gigantic, all-day feast. 960 1280

  

Ifugao People

Ifugao People

With the Ifugao people in the Philippines. 960 1280

  

Jeepney

Jeepney

Riding on top of a jeepney, because that's how they do it here in the Philippines. 960 1280

  

Kava

Kava

Trying some kava at a formal ceremony in New Zealand while wearing the traditional lava-lava. 960 1280

  

Maasai Warriors

Maasai Warriors

Walking with the Maasai warriors of Tanzania. 960 1280

  

'Macbeth' Throne

'Macbeth' Throne

Something whiskey this way comes. At the castle in Scotland that inspired Macbeth. 960 1280

  

Maui Sailing

Maui Sailing

Sailing old-school on Maui. 960 1280

  

Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia, Argentina. I would turn around to see that beautiful view of the Andes, but I'm afraid I might fall. 960 1280

  

Pharmacia

Pharmacia

Stopping into a place called Pharmacia for a little "medicine" in Buenos Aires. 960 1280

  

Puppet

Puppet

Hey, wait a minute: This puppet in Sicily looks an awful lot like me … ;-) 960 1280

  

Rugby

Rugby

About to play rugby with some professionals in New Zealand. This could go a little sideways, I'm thinking. 960 1280

  

Sailing

Sailing

Sailing into the sunset in Zanzibar, Tanzania. 960 1280

  

Rock Sledding

Rock Sledding

Doing a little rock sledding in Hawaii. It's all downhill from here. 960 1280

  

Shepherds

Shepherds

With shepherds on the Greek island of Crete. 960 1280

  

Deer in Argentina

Deer in Argentina

Oh, deer! 960 1280

  

Snowshoeing

Snowshoeing

A little snowshoeing through the Andes of Patagonia, Argentina. 960 1280

  

St. Andrews

St. Andrews

At the world-famous St. Andrews golf course in Scotland. Oh, yeah, and I'm wearing funny clothes. 960 1280

  

A Match Made in New Zealand

A Match Made in New Zealand

I love you... still 960 1280

  

Viking Cruise

Viking Cruise

Oh, it's THAT Viking cruise line?! (Shetland, Scotland) 960 1280

  

Farnum Hill Ciders: Lebanon, N.H.

Farnum Hill Ciders: Lebanon, N.H.

“We’re trying to make cider that’s dry but has a very bright acidity and fruit for miles, with a tannic underpinning and a bright, clean, fruity finish,” explains Stephen Wood, co-proprietor of Farnum Hill (and a 2014 James Beard Award semifinalist). On the cidery’s Growler Days in September and October, visitors can stop by the cider room, purchase a glass jug for $3, and fill it with one of Farnum Hill’s kegged offerings for a mere $10; you’d be hard-pressed to find a finer celebration of fall.  960 1280

  

Virtue Cider: Fennville, Michigan

Virtue Cider: Fennville, Michigan

On Michigan’s Cider Coast, former Goose Island brewmaster Gregory Hall and co-founder Stephen Schmakel use traditional farmhouse production methods to produce European-style craft cider with fruit from local family farms. Virtue Cider’s tasting room, bottle shop and farm market are open every day; guests who are 21 and over can make reservations for a tour on Fridays, Saturdays or Sundays. The cidery’s cat is named Pippin, of course. 960 1280

  

Alpenfire Cider: Port Townsend, Washington

Alpenfire Cider: Port Townsend, Washington

Washington State’s first organic cidery welcomes humans and a fairly astonishing array of local creatures; Alpenfire’s orchard is cornered by mason bee houses and attracts wild birds, deer, coyote and bobcats (“along with the less welcome rabbits and voles”). The cidery’s tasting room is open on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays through December, and “visitors are always encouraged to visit the orchard and most of the production,” says cidery co-owner Nancy Bishop. “For serious tours we like to schedule ahead.” 960 1280

Jen Lee Chapman  

Albemarle CiderWorks: North Garden, Virginia

Albemarle CiderWorks: North Garden, Virginia

The orchardists at Albemarle CiderWorks draw inspiration from their love of vintage tree fruit varieties; they first planted an array of apples in 2000 and began fermenting and bottling ciders in 2009. On November 5th (for its Harvest Festival) and the 19th-20th (as an open house for Cider Week Virginia), Albemarle will be offering tours of its space; its tasting room, in turn, is open every day. 960 1280

  

Citizen Cider: Burlington, Vermont

Citizen Cider: Burlington, Vermont

Citizen Cider is making its way from Vermont across the country—it’s currently available in the eastern U.S. and heading west—but its cellar ciders are only available at its tasting room in Burlington. Citizen’s offerings range from limited-edition varietals like Northern Spy to the non-traditional ginger-and-lemon Dirty Mayor; all of the fruit in its ciders hail from local orchards. Citizen Cider’s Cheray MacFarland suggests pairing a glass with a local cheese: “Vermont-crafted cheeses are great on their own, but add our cider to the mix and it’s a solid winner.”  960 1280

  

AeppelTreow Winery & Distillery: Burlington, Wisconsin

AeppelTreow Winery & Distillery: Burlington, Wisconsin

At AeppelTreow, visitors are welcome to stop by and watch the cidermaking team work or to stroll through the orchards and picnic at their leisure, says ciderwright Charles McGonegal. AeppelTreow produces sparkling, draft, still and fortified cider, perry (that is, the pear analogue to cider), and whiskey and brandies; its tasting room offers a chance to try them all. Don’t let the sophisticated offerings lull you into a false sense of formality, though: “We’re located in a barn on an apple orchard, after all.” 960 1280

  

Argus Cidery: Austin, Texas

Argus Cidery: Austin, Texas

The Argus team began production in 2010 because they wanted to make the kind of cider they wanted to drink—that is, dry, bright and effervescent. They now produce small-format ciders with Washington State apples and large-format, limited-edition ciders with apples from southern orchards; none of their ciders are pasteurized or back-sweetened. The cidery’s tasting room offers weekend visitors both flights of its current pressings and a glimpse of what might crop up in future years. 960 1280

Max Photography  

Redbyrd Orchard Cider: Trumansburg, N.Y.

Redbyrd Orchard Cider: Trumansburg, N.Y.

If you run into Redbyrd’s co-founder Eric Schatt at the picturesque Finger Lakes Cider House (home to the fruits of five cideries’ labor), he’ll probably tell you to try the Cloudsplitter. “[It’s] a blend of our very favorite cider apples, mostly European bittersharps and sharps which gives the cider bright, vibrant acidity and plentiful tannins. Cloudsplitter is also a true expression of the terroir of our two hilltop orchard sites.” 960 1280

Jason Koski  

South Hill Cider: Ithaca, N.Y.

South Hill Cider: Ithaca, N.Y.

South Hill cidermaker Steve Selin produced 1,250 cases of cider last year with apples from his hilltop orchard—and apples from other small orchards, abandoned orchards and wild apples. His “Packbasket” cider gets its name from its harvest: “[W]e found one stand of wild trees in a high valley with a good crop. These hidden trees were far enough from the dirt road that we could only retrieve the fruit by hauling it out on our backs.” South Hill’s ciders are poured at the Finger Lakes Cider House and are available in New York and by mail.   960 1280

  

Black Apple Crossing: Springdale, Arkansas

Black Apple Crossing: Springdale, Arkansas

The Shiloh Museum of Ozark History—which happens to be down the street from Black Apple Crossing’s production facilities and tap room—helps its neighbors name their ciders.  They gave the 1904 its moniker as a nod to the World’s Fair held that year in St. Louis, where the Arkansas apple exhibit won 209 medals; the cider is an all-Ozark blend. As owner and cofounder Leo Orpin notes, northwestern Arkansas was once known as the “apple belt” of the United States; he and his partners are doing their part to bring the business back. 960 1280

  

Castle Hill Cider: Keswick, Virginia

Castle Hill Cider: Keswick, Virginia

A young Thomas Jefferson once frolicked at Castle Hill, where the tasting room serves ciders made on the property and visitors can retire with their beverages to an elegant octagonal porch. Castle Hill’s orchard is “only” 80 years old, but its Levity cider is fermented in kvevri (vessels that have been used in wine production since sixth century B.C.); all things considered, there’s a lot of history in Keswick. 960 1280

  

E.Z. Orchards: Salem, Oregon

E.Z. Orchards: Salem, Oregon

E.Z. Orchards has been growing apples in the Willamette Valley for nearly a century; its cidermaking, in turn, dates back to 2000, and the orchards now grow American, English and French heirloom cider apples. Visitors can stop by its farm market on Saturdays and Sundays, and orchardist and cidermaker Kevin Zielinski will be pouring cider at the Portland Nursery Apple Tasting Event on October 7-9 and 14-16. 960 1280

Good Beer Hunting (http://www.goodbeerhunting.com)  

B. Nektar Meadery: Ferndale, Michigan

B. Nektar Meadery: Ferndale, Michigan

B. Nektar is the largest meadery in the country; it’s also one of the most playful cideries out there. The 22 taps in the modern-industrial serving space just down the road from its production facilities feature everything from Zombie Killer, a cider with mouth-puckering tart cherry juice, to The Dude’s Rug, with seasonal spices that “really chai the room together”. For this year’s HallowMead costume party, the team will be blending The Dude’s Rug with pumpkin purée in its slushie machine. 960 1280

  

Sweet Aztec Corn Punch: Post 390, Boston

Sweet Aztec Corn Punch: Post 390, Boston

Having a hard time letting go of backyard barbecues? Say your goodbyes in Boston with a creamy cocktail that makes the most of the harvest. “This late-summer punch infuses tequila, saffron, cilantro and lime with sweetcorn,” Post 390’s beverage manager, Jason Percival, explains. “Topped with lime, agave, Horchata, milk and egg whites, this is the perfect clarified cocktail to celebrate the end of summer and start of fall.” 960 1280

  

Kina Kir: Harvest, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Kina Kir: Harvest, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Harvest in Cambridge spans the seasons with an elegant, cava-based twist on a French classic; with Ketel One vodka, St. Germain and Lillet Rose, this sparkling cocktail is a crowd-pleaser. “I think the Kina Kir is a great fall drink because it acts as a bridge between summer and winter cocktails, refreshing and floral but also with enough body to stand up to colder weather," beverage director Brahm Callahan says. 960 1280

  

Pear Mon Frère: Bourbon Steak at Four Seasons Hotel, Washington, D.C.

Pear Mon Frère: Bourbon Steak at Four Seasons Hotel, Washington, D.C.

Head bartender Torrence Swain serves fall-fruit-forward cocktails beside the fire pits on Bourbon Steak’s brick patio. Elementary apple this ain’t: the Pear Mon Frère combines Pear Calvados with apple cider, clove and cinnamon. “Pears and apples have similar profiles that work to complement each other—the clarity, purity, earthiness and slightly tart citrus taste make for a truly harmonious sip. The Pear Calvados is subtle and doesn’t overpower the notes of apple, creating a truly fantastic and slightly sweet blend of the harvest season fruits.” 960 1280

  

Fall Gimlet: Standby, Detroit

Fall Gimlet: Standby, Detroit

Opihr, a cardamom-heavy Oriental spiced gin, updates Raymond Chandler’s cocktail of choice (along with grapefruit sherbet, nutmeg, lime and salt) at Standby in Detroit. A “real gimlet,” as one of his characters noted in The Long Goodbye, “is half gin and half Rose’s lime juice and nothing else”—but this gimlet has character to carry it through a Michigan winter. 960 1280

  

Ain’t Nobody Got Thyme for That: Cook & Brown Public House, Providence, R.I.

Ain’t Nobody Got Thyme for That: Cook & Brown Public House, Providence, R.I.

Prepare to impress early fall cocktail-party guests by whipping up a batch of thyme simple syrup (bring equal parts granulated sugar and water to a simmer, add a few sprigs of thyme, remove from heat and steep for an hour); then shake ½ an ounce of said syrup with 1½ oz. Barr Hill gin, ¾ oz grapefruit juice, ¼ oz lemon juice and 3 dashes of grapefruit bitters, pour over ice in a Collins glass, then top with ginger beer. “This drink hits all the proper notes—acidic, slightly bitter, with a touch of savory sweetness that is rounded out by a ginger beer spiced finish,” Cook & Brown Public House beverage director Ryan Kennedy says. He uses Barr Hill Gin for its subtle honey notes, which “really start to evoke the upcoming longer nights but still remind you that summer was just a few weeks ago. This is as refreshing-early-fall as it gets.” 960 1280

  

Golden Fang: Death & Co, New York City

Golden Fang: Death & Co, New York City

In the Big Apple, nothing says “autumn” like a long, contemplative walk through Central Park, catching a subway train downtown and warming yourself with a roaring...tiki drink. With lime and orange juices, and a trio of tropical syrups (ginger, passionfruit and vanilla), this gin-based shared cocktail sounds like a stowaway from a more tropical place—but New York City is a melting pot, after all, and a scorpion bowl is a fine way to stave off the cold. The drink is finished with cardamom bitters and a showstopping dash of cinnamon that catches fire tableside: “What’s unique about the flame is that it’s not only the visual appeal, but when the grated cinnamon hits the flame, the toasted aroma really fills the room and enhances the entire olfactory experience of the cocktail,” Death & Co head bartender Tyson Buhler says. Vastly preferable to a Yankee Candle. 960 1280

  

Caribbean Milk Punch: Brennan’s, New Orleans

Caribbean Milk Punch: Brennan’s, New Orleans

Fall cocktails have a Caribbean flavor, in turn, for French Quarter brunchgoers at Brennan’s in New Orleans (where milk punch has been served for 70 years). With Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum, Maker’s Mark, heavy cream, vanilla and nutmeg, Caribbean milk punch anticipates (and is vastly superior to) the eggnog that’ll appear at holiday parties around the country a few months later. For another taste of New Orleans, try Ojen, a Jack-Maxwell-approved licorice liquor.  960 1280

  

The Phantom Regiment: Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, Nashville

The Phantom Regiment: Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, Nashville

Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery’s director of operations, James Henley, suggests “bringing the campfire to [your] cocktail” by using a smoky spirit (like mezcal or scotch), a smoked glass (a vessel that you’ve infused with aroma), or using a smoky ingredient—like Ancho Reyes, the smoked spice in the distillery’s Phantom Regiment, which also features Belle Meade Bourbon, Carpano Antica (an Italian vermouth), Nux Alpina Black Walnut liqueur, Angostura bitters and an absinthe rinse. “It’s like reading a mystery novel in a dimly lit study on a cool autumn night.” (Check out Jack Maxwell's visit to the distillery here.)  960 1280

  

Brute Force: The Dead Rabbit, New York City

Brute Force: The Dead Rabbit, New York City

Jillian Vose’s Brute Force at The Dead Rabbit is genteel and lethal in equal doses. Each well-mannered ingredient (like green-tea-infused Tapatio Blanco Tequila and Merlet Poire) has a counterpart with an ulterior motive (like Wray & Nephew overproof rum and two dashes of absinthe). Garnished with nutmeg, it’s a family holiday: sweet like your nana and sneaky like that uncle no one mentions. 960 1280

Brent Herrig  

Fig & Whiskey: Pizzeria Vetri, Washington D.C.

Fig & Whiskey: Pizzeria Vetri, Washington D.C.

With High West double rye whiskey, Amaro Della Sirene liqueur (which builds herbaceous flavor on a caramel base), fresh lime juice and fig-and-acacia-honey jam, the Fig & Whiskey at Pizzeria Vetri bids farewell to fig season, which winds down in October. “As we get into fall and the colder months, guests tend to enjoy warmer spirits—whiskey in particular. The jam presents texture along with some richer fall-type flavors,” beverage Manager Rah-Jah Kelly says. 960 1280

  

Pine Needle Margarita: Loa Bar, New Orleans

Pine Needle Margarita: Loa Bar, New Orleans

Loa Bar’s Pine Needle Margarita is, quite literally, a taste of New Orleans in the fall: “Spirit Handler” Alan Walter forages in City Park for ingredients like Spanish moss and pine needles that he cooks down à la minute for cocktails. This particular harvest features añejo tequila, pine needles, thyme, Cointreau, bay and sassafras. Jack's paid a visit to Loa Bar; click here to follow in his footsteps all over the city.   960 1280

Eugenia Uhl  

Falling in Love: Babbalucci, New York City

Falling in Love: Babbalucci, New York City

At Babbalucci on Harlem’s Lenox Avenue, bar manager Bruno Molfetta combines herbaceous Gin Mare with mild, sweet yellow Chartreuse, citrus, thyme and a red Bordeaux syrup; it’s the perfect cocktail for an autumn date night. 960 1280

  

Clarified Bloody Mary: Plum Bar, Oakland, California

Clarified Bloody Mary: Plum Bar, Oakland, California

Oakland's Plum Bar makes magic with jewel-bright local ingredients. Adam Chapman’s Clarified Bloody Mary starts with sea bean, a seaweed with a salty, acidic flavor; he pickles it lightly with vinegar and coriander, then combines it with barrel-aged Tito’s, Early Girl tomato, spices and black pepper oil. It’s quite possibly the loveliest Mary in town. 960 1280

  

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