Bloody Saturday in Ireland

Mariana van Zeller and Michael Voltaggio travel to Northern Ireland to bring Catholics and Protestants together for a meal and conversation. They witness heated clashes during marching season, sip on Guinness and dine in the Crumlin Road Jail.

From This Episode

"Big Bill" Campbell Memorial

"Big Bill" Campbell Memorial

Mariana van Zeller and Michael Voltaggio stand in front of a memorial for “Big Bill” Campbell, a commander in the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), whose goal was to combat the Irish Republican Army. 960 1280

  

Shankill Road

Shankill Road

Loyalist Plum Smith sits in front of old photos on a wall on Shankill Road, a popular target of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) that has been bombed 3 times, the most recent and deadliest of which occurred in 1993. 960 1280

  

"Dark Hedges" of Northern Ireland

"Dark Hedges" of Northern Ireland

The gorgeous and famous "Dark Hedges" — beech trees that lead up to the Gracehill House — have been featured on Game of Thrones. Related: All Men Must Travel: Game of Thrones Destinations 960 1280

  

Hudson Bar

Hudson Bar

Michael and Mariana sample high-end whiskey at the Hudson Bar in Belfast. 960 1280

  

Top-Shelf Whiskey

Top-Shelf Whiskey

Michael Stewart, owner of the Hudson Bar, right, talks to Michael Voltaggio about the top-shelf whiskey. 960 1280

  

Milltown Cemetery

Milltown Cemetery

The resting place for IRA hunger strikers and generations of Republicans who were buried after "the Troubles," a period of extreme conflict in Northern Ireland that started in the 1960s and reached as far as mainland Europe.


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In Memoriam of Bobby Sands

In Memoriam of Bobby Sands

Michael Voltaggio stands in front of a mural that remembers Bobby Sands, an Irish nationalist who led a hunger strike in prison, where he died. 960 1280

  

Duke of York

Duke of York

Mariana and Michael visit the Duke of York pub in Belfast to get some Guinness. 960 1280

  

"In Your Face"

"In Your Face"

During the Troubles, Belfast native Frankie Quinn took a series of photos that showed Northern Ireland in the 1980s, including this one, titled In Your Face. 960 1280

  

Crumlin Road Jail

Crumlin Road Jail

The Crumlin Road Jail (or gaol) formerly housed several members of the UVF. A section of the interior was damaged in 1991 by a bomb set off by the IRA. Closed down in 1996, Crumlin Road Jail is now one of the most popular sights on Northern Ireland’s "terror tour." It's open for daily public tours and evening paranormal tours. 960 1280

  

Dinner Prep

Dinner Prep

Chef Michael Voltaggio prepares an Irish meal that his grandmother would be proud of for the dinner guests at Crumlin Road Jail. 960 1280

  

Dinner at Crumlin Road Jail

Dinner at Crumlin Road Jail

Guests from opposing sides of the Troubles join Mariana and Michael for a discussion and dinner at the Crumlin Road Jail. 960 1280

  

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Dhani soaks up the uniquely Irish culture of Dublin's main drag, Grafton Street.

More From Ireland

traditional irish breakfast, sausage, black pudding, eggs, beans
Full Irish Breakfast

Full Irish Breakfast

Many Irish begin a slow Sunday morning with a large breakfast of fried eggs, pork sausage, bacon, beans, black pudding and a fried tomato. If that’s not enough, some Irish breakfasts also feature mushrooms, hash browns and chicken liver. Find your dream Irish breakfast at any cozy pub, such as Slattery’s Bar in Dublin. 960 1280

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Dublin Coddle

Dublin Coddle

What do you get when you put carrot, onion, bacon, pork sausage and potato together? A Dublin coddle. This traditional Irish meal is a clever way to use up any leftovers, yet this homely dish always seems to taste brand new. Try the Dublin coddle in its namesake city at Gallagher’s Boxty House in Temple Bar. 960 1280

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Black Pudding

Black Pudding

This Irish delicacy isn’t to be skipped. The “pudding” is actually a blood sausage, containing pork’s blood as well as oats or barley. To find the best black pudding, venture to Ireland’s award-winning butcher McCarthy’s of Kanturk in County Cork. 960 1280

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Cabbage and Bacon

Cabbage and Bacon

Everything’s better with bacon, and that includes cabbage. This signature Irish dish will have you furrowing your brow as you wonder why you ever questioned boiled cabbage. For a nicer version of this classic, try Dublin’s the Winding Stair restaurant. 960 1280

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Guinness

Guinness

A pint of Guinness is a necessity on any trip to Ireland. Tour the world-famous Guinness Storehouse in Dublin to learn the history of the brew and the proper way to pour a pint. The top floor of the storehouse offers a breathtaking view of the city, too. 960 1280

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Fish and Chips

Fish and Chips

For a no-brainer night of fun, go to an Irish pub and order delicious fish and chips — or, as Americans know it, fried fish and french fries. Fill up at the Merry Ploughboy Pub just outside of Dublin, which also has live Irish music. After a pint or 2, you and your friends will take the dance floor by storm.

 

 

 

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Chicken Wings

Chicken Wings

While many Americans think they have a stronghold on chicken wings, the Irish may do it better. Ireland’s spicy chicken wings will tickle your taste buds with absolute bliss. Snag an order from the world-famous Dublin pub Elephant & Castle. 960 1280

Daniel Loiselle/E+/Getty Images  

Lamb

Lamb

Lamb is one of Ireland’s greatest specialties. The secret to the perfect Irish lamb chop? Guinness. Eat some of the best Guinness-glazed lamb chops of your life at O’Neill’s Bar & Restaurant in Dublin. 960 1280

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Irish Stew

Irish Stew

Every pub has its own riff on Irish stew. The basic recipe is a delectable mixture of meat, veggies and a whole lot of potatoes. The modest restaurant at O’Shea’s Hotel in Dublin has an Irish stew that will surely satisfy your taste buds. 960 1280

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Colcannon

Colcannon

This traditional Irish dish has everything you need: butter, potatoes … and a bit of kale or cabbage. The Irish take on mashed potatoes is very popular on Halloween. Dabble in some colcannon at the bar at Oliver St. John Gogarty's in Dublin. 960 1280

StockFood Creative/Getty Images  

Taste of Ireland  10 Photos

Temple Bar
Temple Bar

Temple Bar

Temple bar
Temple Bar, in Dublin, has retained a medieval street pattern, with cobbled streets. Home to the Irish Photography Centre, the Irish Film Archive, as well as various nightclubs and bars, Ireland's cultural district saw the first performance of Handel's "Messiah" in 1742.
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Dingle Peninsula

Dingle Peninsula

Dingle Peninsula
A remote area of Ireland, the Dingle Peninsula is the place to see traditional Irish heritage. Ancient traditions have survived in this Gaelic-speaking area far more than anywhere else in the country. The 30-mile-long peninsula on Ireland's west coast also has more than 2,000 archaeological sites.
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Christ Church

Christ Church

Christ Church Cathedral
Sitting on what used to be the heart of medieval Dublin, the Christ Church Cathedral is the official seat of the Church of Ireland. Founded in 1028 by a Viking king, this cathedral still captivates visitors of all backgrounds with its beauty and history.
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Fort Dunree

Fort Dunree

Fort Dunree
Built in 1798, Fort Dunree sits on a rocky cliff in Northern Ireland. Irish forces were stationed here during WWII to prevent the nations at war from violating Ireland's neutrality. The fort is now a museum with its bunkers full of Irish military history.
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Battle of the Boyne

Battle of the Boyne

The Battle of the Boyne
"11th Night" is a celebration widely observed by Protestant groups in Northern Ireland with costumed reenactments of William of Orange's 1690 defeat of King James, a Catholic, in the Battle of the Boyne. Bonfires are lit all over Ireland to commemorate the event.
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Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle

Blarney Castle
Visitors to this historic castle can bend over backwards (literally) to kiss the Blarney Stone, known for its ability to "deceive without offending." If kissing historic artifacts isn't your thing, a garden of rock formations on the castle's grounds, called Rock Close, offers visitors a chance to climb the "Wishing Steps."
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Penguins

Penguins

Dublin City Zoo
The spelling of Dublin was originally "Dubh Linn," which means "Black Pool" in Gaelic, referring to an ancient treacle lake in the city. The lake is now part of the penguin enclosure at the Dublin City Zoo.
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Cliffs of Moher

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher
With its highest point towering 700 feet, the Cliffs of Moher offer amazing views of the Aran Islands, Galway Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. You'll also find a nature preserve; the area is one of the major nesting areas for seabirds in Ireland. The cliffs have been a tourist destination for centuries -- O'Brien's Tower, which stands at the highest point of the cliffs, was built in 1835 as an observation tower.
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Trinity College

Trinity College

Trinity College
Trinity College in Dublin is Ireland's oldest university. Established in 1592, it was once the stomping grounds of Oscar Wilde and Dracula’s Bram Stoker. A star athlete, Stoker graduated in 1870, and Wilde followed in 1874, with many academic awards under his belt.
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Bank of Ireland

Bank of Ireland

Irish Houses of Parliament
Although it's now the Bank of Ireland, visitors can still tour the former Irish Houses of Parliament. Built in 1739, it was the world's first parliamentary house built for the sole purpose of housing a government. It served as the seat of parliament for the Kingdom of Ireland until Ireland became part of the United Kingdom in 1800.
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Navan Fort

Navan Fort

Navan Fort
Not so much a fort as a pagan ceremonial ground, Navan Fort is full of ancient Irish history. While the site is not much more than a giant grass covered mound, it’s the setting for many Irish myths. Actors help bring the fort to life through reenactments of cooking, weaving, and farming during the Iron Age.
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Newgrange

Newgrange

Newgrange Megalithic Passage Tomb
Built around 3200 B.C., Newgrange is 600 years older than the Giza Pyramids and 1,000 years older than Stonehenge. According to legend, Newgrange was the home of Oenghus, the god of love. At dawn on the winter solstice, a shaft of sunlight shines through the roof over the entrance and penetrates the passage to light up the chamber for 17 minutes.
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Garden of Remembrance

Garden of Remembrance

Garden of Remembrance
This memorial garden in Dublin commemorates the many Irish revolutionaries who fought for freedom in various rebellions. The garden sits where the Irish Volunteers formed their organization in 1913 to secure rights for all of Ireland.
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Shelbourne

Shelbourne

The Shelbourne Hotel
The Shelbourne, now a newly renovated and upscale hotel in Dublin, was where the first Irish Constitution was drafted and signed in 1922. The hotel overlooks St. Stephen’s Green, Europe's largest garden square.
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Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel
Supposedly the site of the king of Munster's conversion by St. Patrick in the 5th century A.D., Rock of Cashel is a great place to see medieval architecture. The buildings, still standing since the 12th and 13th centuries, include Cormac’s Chapel, which holds the sarcophagus of King Cormac, a former king of Munster.
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Ireland History  15 Photos

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