Take a Daycation with Harry and Bruce

With tight schedules and lots to see, travel bloggers Harry Yuan and Bruce Aguirre guide you through Washington D.C., for the ultimate one-day trip to our nation's capital on "Daycation."

About the Show

Travel bloggers Harry Yuan and Bruce Aguirre use their expertise to devise the perfect one-day itinerary showcasing the best and most unique experiences a city has to offer. These lifelong globetrotters deliver on the promise of things to do, places to eat and sights to see in each town. With 10 years and over 36 countries under their belts, Harry and Bruce have learned they don't require a week or a long weekend to a have an awesome vacation. Sometimes all they need is one day.

More DC Travel Tips

National WWII Memorial

National WWII Memorial

Between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial is one of DC’s newer landmarks. It opened in 2004 to honor the 16 million people who served in the country’s armed forces during World War II. The fountains, pillars and plaques form a circle that’s particularly impressive when it’s lit up at night. Don’t miss the obvious photo op: you in front of the pillar with your home state’s name engraved on it. 960 1280

Bruce Yuanyue Bi/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Newseum

Newseum

Read all about it at this museum, whose new building near the National Mall opened in 2008. It examines both world events through the eyes of the media and the history of journalism itself. Among its 15 galleries are sections of the Berlin Wall, stories about First Amendment rights, multimedia exhibits on the digital revolution, and front pages from American and international newspapers. In the Interactive Newsroom, visitors can test their own reporting skills to create a newspaper story or a TV news broadcast. 960 1280

Winiker/Photolibrary/Getty Images  

Jefferson Memorial

Jefferson Memorial

This monument for the author of the Declaration of Independence and third president cuts a fine silhouette from across the Tidal Basin. The view is especially beautiful in the spring when the cherry trees around the water’s edge are in bloom. Don’t start the trek around to the memorial unless you’re wearing comfortable shoes — the walk is longer than it looks. But on the way, you can also check the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, which opened in 2011, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial off your list. Or get a different perspective in the summer by renting a paddleboat on the Tidal Basin. 960 1280

Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images  

National Zoo

National Zoo

Bao Bao may be growing up, but it’s still exciting to see the young panda and her parents, Mei Xiang and Tian Tian. The cub, born Aug. 23, 2013, will eventually be sent to China, but in the meantime, visitors are lining up to catch a glimpse of her playing or eating. While Bao Bao is the main attraction, she isn’t the only baby at the free Smithsonian zoo: The big cats exhibit features a pair of Sumatran tiger cubs, also born in August 2013, and 6 African lion cubs, born in 2 litters in early 2014. And of course, you can’t miss the gorillas, orangutans, Asian elephants, American bison and hundreds of other animals. 960 1280

The Washington Post/Getty Images  

Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Vietnam Veterans Memorial

The reflective, black granite wall honors American soldiers who died or went missing in the Vietnam War, and it is inscribed with more than 58,000 names. Even if no one you know is listed there, take a contemplative moment to grasp the enormity of it all. For those who are looking for a specific name, there are alphabetical catalogs at the memorial entrances that give a panel and row number for each person. 960 1280

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images  

Eastern Market

Eastern Market

This is not your typical neighborhood farmers market. While Eastern Market, located in the Capitol Hill neighborhood, does offer fresh produce and flowers, it also lines up vendors selling everything from furniture and jewelry to cakes and pottery. The indoor section is open every day except Monday, but on the weekends, the market moves outside, too, and becomes a gathering place with live music and local food. Why bother with one of those “I Heart DC” T-shirts when you can shop for a unique, handmade souvenir? 960 1280

Maddie Meyer  

Georgetown

Georgetown

There’s plenty to explore in one of DC’s oldest and most famous neighborhoods. Stroll along cobblestone sidewalks and imagine all the history that has been viewed through the windows of those row houses. Go on a shopping spree on M Street, where you’ll find both big-name retailers and intimate boutiques. But don’t spend all your money: You’ll need to have some left so you can indulge in the amazing dining and nightlife options in the area. Start with appetizers and cocktails on the waterfront while enjoying a beautiful view of the Potomac. 960 1280

Hisham Ibrahim  

Washington Monument

Washington Monument

The 555-foot obelisk dedicated to George Washington towers over the city and can be spotted even from Virginia. It was closed for repairs after being damaged in a 5.8-magnitude earthquake in August 2011, but the landmark finally reopened in May 2014. Free tickets to go inside and ride to the top are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Or you can simply bask in its glory with a picnic or a game of catch on the surrounding lawn. 960 1280

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images  

International Spy Museum

International Spy Museum

Examine all the evidence as you make your way through the largest collection of international spy-related artifacts on public display. Visitors will learn about the role espionage has played throughout history, from Moses to Stalin, and see the tools of the trade, including tiny cameras, hidden messages, concealed weapons and more. Wannabe agents can sign up for Operation Spy, an interactive experience that challenges participants to find the clues and crack the case. 960 1280

Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images  

East Potomac Golf Course

East Potomac Golf Course

Even if you can’t hit the fairway to save your life, at least you’ll get a great view of the monuments when you tee it up at East Potomac. Its 36 holes, split among the appropriately named Red, White and Blue courses, crisscross an island right next to the Tidal Basin. The site is also a great place to work on your swing on the heated driving range in the winter, see the cheerful cherry blossoms in the spring, or bring the family for a round of mini-golf in the summer. 960 1280

Bloomberg/Getty Images  

Museums on the National Mall

Museums on the National Mall

The great thing about the National Mall is that you can roam in and out of the 10-plus museums as you please — entry to them is free. Check out an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art (pictured); pop into the Air and Space Museum to see the Wright brothers’ plane; and swing by the Museum of American History to examine the flag that inspired the national anthem, Dorothy’s ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz, and Michelle Obama’s 2009 inauguration dress. Spend as much or as little time as you want in each spot without wasting the cost of admission. And in between, find a grassy spot to sit and people-watch under the imposing shadow of the Capitol. 960 1280

Luke1138/iStock/Getty Images  

Old Ebbitt Grill

Old Ebbitt Grill

When you’re ready to refuel for more DC adventures, stop for a meal or a drink at the city’s oldest saloon. The Old Ebbitt Grill was established in 1856 on the edge of Chinatown. The current location on 15th Street is just a block from the White House. It’s a popular spot for politicos, and even presidents including Ulysses S. Grant and Teddy Roosevelt are said to have frequented the bar. The restaurant is known for its oysters, but it also serves breakfast and a wide selection of entrees and sandwiches. 960 1280

Jason Colston/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images  

Kennedy Center

Kennedy Center

Long day of sightseeing? Sit back and soak up some culture at one of several venues inside the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Concerts by the National Symphony Orchestra, free shows on the Millennium Stage, blockbuster Broadway tours such as Wicked and The Book of Mormon — the schedule has something for everyone. After the last curtain call, make sure to venture up to the roof deck, where you can get a panoramic view of the city all lit up.  960 1280

Hisham Ibrahim/Photolibrary/Getty Images  

US National Arboretum

US National Arboretum

This 446-acre site features a number of gardens and collections that can be traversed via car, bike, bus tour, tram or foot. Escape the city life among the dogwoods, azaleas, ferns and magnolias — you’re even allowed to bring your dog. Don’t miss the bonsai museum or the Capitol columns, 22 pillars that became part of the Capitol building in 1828. They were removed 30 years later because they couldn’t sufficiently support the dome, which was built bigger than planned. The columns didn’t make their way to the arboretum until the 1980s, but they have become the site’s most photographed feature.  960 1280

Bob Balestri/iStock/Getty Images  

Ford’s Theatre

Ford’s Theatre

Abraham Lincoln was shot at Ford’s Theatre by John Wilkes Booth on April 14, 1865. Visit the on-site museum, which details his presidency and assassination, and the Petersen House across the street, where he was taken for treatment and ultimately died a few hours later. Ford’s Theatre is also still a working performance venue, so if you like a little entertainment with your history lesson, get tickets for a show. 960 1280

Paul Whitfield/Doorling Kindersley/Getty Images  

Supreme Court

Supreme Court

For visitors who are interested in the law and the actual procedures of the federal government, a stop at the US Supreme Court is a must. If you’re lucky, you’ll be there on a day of oral arguments, which are open to the public. Regardless, though, visitors can tour the building, view the current exhibitions and, when the court is not in session, check the schedule of courtroom lectures. Just note that the building is closed on Saturdays and Sundays, so leave it off your weekend itinerary. 960 1280

Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images  

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery

Venture across the river into Virginia to explore this moving site, whose 624 acres honor those who served the United States. The peaceful, beautiful landscape is dotted with more than 400,000 graves, including those of prominent figures such as Thurgood Marshall, the first black Supreme Court justice, and Pierre Charles L’Enfant, who designed the layout of Washington, DC. You’ll also want to see the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Eternal Flame burning at the gravesite of John F. Kennedy, one of only 2 presidents buried in Arlington National Cemetery (the other is William Taft).  960 1280

Peter Gridley/Photographer’s Choice/Getty Images  

Ford's Theatre, Washington, DC
Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre

Five days after the Civil War ended, Abraham Lincoln arrived at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, DC, to see an evening performance of a popular play. In the third act, John Wilkes Booth entered the president’s box and shot him in the back of the head. Today, see the restored theatre -- and hear a recounting of that fateful night -- by a National Park Service ranger.

Location: Washington, DC
960 1280

Maxwell MacKenzie  

George Washington Memorial Parkway

George Washington Memorial Parkway

The DC area isn’t exactly known for recreational driving; the GW Parkway is the exception. From north to south (and vice versa), the parkway offers a scenic, nearly 40-mile drive alongside the nation’s capital. Enjoy the view of woods and forests, the same land that George Washington would have traveled on horseback.

Locations: Virginia, Washington, DC
960 1280

Mario Roberto Duran Ortiz, Wikimedia Commons  

Frederick Douglass House

Frederick Douglass House

Born into slavery, Frederick Douglass went on to become the most influential abolitionist of his day. In 1877, with years of public service behind him, Douglass settled into this home in the Washington, DC, area of Anacostia. Douglass lived in the hilltop home, which he called Cedar Hill, until his death in 1895.

Location: Washington, DC
960 1280

Walter Smalling for the Historic American Buildings Survey, Wikimedia Commons  

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

For nearly 100 years, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal carried resources such as coal and wood to communities along the Potomac River – including Georgetown in Washington, DC. Today, enjoy a canal boat ride. Also hike, camp, kayak, bicycle and canoe in the surrounding national historical park, which spans nearly 185 miles.

Location: Washington, DC, into Maryland and West Virginia
960 1280

Bo Nielsen, flickr  

Harpers Ferry

Harpers Ferry

The town of Harpers Ferry is located at the intersection of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers. But what really put the town on the map was John Brown’s raid: In 1859, the fervent abolitionist led a group of 21 men in a raid upon a weapons arsenal. See where the 36-hour raid began and ended, with Brown’s capture at the armory fire engine house.

Location: 50 miles from DC, 80 miles from Baltimore
960 1280

Mark Fickett, Wikimedia Commons  

Hampton National Historic Site

Hampton National Historic Site

For 7 generations, the Ridgley family called this Georgian mansion home. Today, visitors can tour the 62-acre estate, located north of Baltimore, to see one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in America. Equally captivating is a tour of the slave quarters; Hampton was one of Maryland’s largest slave-holding estates.

Location: Baltimore County, MD
960 1280

Eli Pousson, flickr  

Antietam National Battlefield

Antietam National Battlefield

The bloodiest 1-day battle in US history happened in Sharpsburg, MD, in 1862 when Union forces began a 12-hour artillery bombardment of Confederate positions. For a time, a small number of Confederate soldiers held their ground on this bridge, far past the predictions of Union General Ambrose Burnside (for whom this bridge would later be named).

Location: 65 miles from Baltimore, 70 miles from DC
960 1280

Frank Kovalchek, flickr  

Captain John Smith Historic Trail

Captain John Smith Historic Trail

Glide along the waterways of the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, just as English explorer John Smith did between 1607 and 1609. The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail extends 3,000 miles along the bay and its tributaries in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC.

Location: Delaware, Maryland, Virginia & DC
960 1280

James River Association, flickr  

Oxon Hill Farm

Oxon Hill Farm

Experience farm life at Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm. The 289 acres, located in Prince George’s County, MD, include a barn, stable, feed building and livestock buildings for cows, horses and chickens. The farm’s centerpiece is Mount Welby, a 2-story brick structure built in the early 1800s by Irish immigrant Dr. Samuel DeButts. The farm was entrusted to the National Park Service in 1959.

Location: Less than 1 hour from DC, 1 hour from Baltimore
960 1280

Pubdog, Wikimedia Commons  

Old Stone House

Old Stone House

This house has been standing longer than America's been a country. Built in 1765, this 3-story home was constructed in several phases during the 18th century. Today, the home, which belonged for a time to an upper-middle-class family, endures in Washington, DC’s Georgetown neighborhood as the oldest unchanged building in the nation’s capital.

Location: M Street in DC's Georgetown neighborhood
960 1280

NCinDC, flickr  

Baltimore National Heritage Area

Baltimore National Heritage Area

As the name implies, Baltimore National Heritage Area is rich in history. Encompassing the Baltimore area, NHA attractions include the star-shaped Fort McHenry (pictured here), best-known for its role in the War of 1812, as well as Baltimore’s oldest neighborhoods such as Federal Hill, Fell’s Point and Mount Vernon (to the north of downtown Baltimore).

Location: An hour's drive from DC
960 1280

Thinkstock  

President’s Park

President’s Park

Who knew? The president of the United States lives in a national park. Every president since John Adams has called the White House home. The 6-story, 132-room home, in the style of an Irish country manor, is part of the 18-acre grounds we know as President’s Park. Want to tour the White House? Make your request to your member of Congress 6 months in advance.

Location: View of Truman Balcony and Ellipse from Constitution Avenue

960 1280

Glyn Lowe Photoworks, flickr  

Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens

Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens

Discover nature in the heart of the city. Encompassing 700 acres, Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens is located in the northeastern corner of Washington, DC, and the Maryland state border. Its position by the Anacostia River provides fertile ground for a variety of flora and fauna, as well as ponds topped with water lilies and lotus flowers. The park also contains DC's only remaining tidal marsh.

Location: Northeastern corner of Washington, DC
960 1280

NCinDC, flickr  

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

Pay a visit to Dumbarton House, a Federal-style house in Washington, DC’s Georgetown neighborhood. The home, which was completed around 1800, is part of the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail. The 290-mile route connects key sites and players in the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812, including forts, battlefields and nature preserves.

Location: Visit any of 60 Chesapeake Bay Gateway along the trail
960 1280

NCinDC, flickr  

Clara Barton House

Clara Barton House

America’s most famous nurse lived here. The Clara Barton House in Glen Echo, MD, is where American humanitarian and Red Cross founder Clara Barton lived the last 15 years of her life. The large wood-frame house sits on 9 acres, and includes more than 35 rooms; it also served as the early headquarters of the American Red Cross.

Location: 2 miles northwest of Washington, DC
960 1280

Leon Reed  

Blink and you may miss this desk-size memorial to America’s 32nd president. When asked how he’d like to be remembered, FDR said a simple stone in front of the National Archives would do. For 30 years, he got his wish -- until a 7.5-acre memorial was dedicated to him by the Tidal Basin. Get more info about The Capital City. Check out our Travel Guide to Washington, D.C. 960 1280

M.V. Jantzen, flickr  

Sure, they’re a traffic nuisance. But the circles that cut through D.C.’s avenues are also loaded with history. Many of the circles (34, in all) are named after American Civil War generals, like Thomas Circle. Here, a statue honors General George Henry Thomas, a Southerner who stayed loyal to the Union at great personal cost. 960 1280

Elvert Barnes, flickr  

When civil engineer Pierre Charles L’Enfant envisioned a future U.S. capital, he thought it should include a memorial “to celebrate the first rise of the Navy and consecrate its progress and achievements.” But it wasn’t until 1987 that the U.S. Navy Memorial was dedicated on Pennsylvania Avenue, America’s Main Street. 960 1280

Kate Mere and Sinha, flickr  

“What are those arches over there?” Anyone driving along 1-95 has had this thought when catching a glimpse of the U.S. Air Force Memorial from afar. Dedicated in 2006, its three stainless steel spires evoke the image of Air Force Thunderbirds in a precision bomb-burst maneuver. 960 1280

Rob & Lisa Meehan, flickr   

Go ahead, sit on Uncle Albert’s lap. This personable memorial honors physics’ great genius. Tucked behind a grove of trees, beside the National Academy of Sciences, the memorial was dedicated in 1979 -- the centennial of Einstein’s birth. 960 1280

Zack Lee, flickr   

At DC’s Southwest Waterfront, you’ll find this haunting tribute to the Titanic’s men, who gave up their lives so that women and children could be saved. Erected by the “women of America” in 1931, the 13-foot granite figure was designed by American sculptor Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. 960 1280

Josh, flickr   

The Civil War saw African Americans granted the right to fight in defense of their country. The African American Civil War Memorial, at the corner of Vermont Avenue, honors the 209,145 such men who fought for the Union. 960 1280

  

“Here we admit a wrong.” With these words, the Memorial to Japanese-American Patriotism in World War II commemorates the 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent forcibly placed in internment camps. It also honors the 30,000 who volunteered for the U.S. Armed Forces -- 800 of whom perished. 960 1280

M.V. Jantzen, flickr   

265,000 women served in the Vietnam War. All were volunteers. The Vietnam Women’s Memorial honors their role, often as nurses on the frontlines. 960 1280

Gorik Francois, flickr   

As in life, George Mason sits in the shadow of Thomas Jefferson, whose own memorial is a short walk away. Mason was the only Founding Father not to sign the U.S. Constitution, fearing it did not go far enough in protecting individual rights. What followed was the Bill of Rights. 960 1280

Cliff, flickr   

In the 1880s, one man made it his personal mission to discourage people nationwide from drinking alcohol. So he funded “Temperance Fountains” across the U.S. Here’s one, on Pennsylvania Avenue. Pay your respects at this four-columned sculpture, before grabbing a beer at the tavern across the street. 960 1280

Cliff, flickr   

D.C. is home to many war memorials, but none yet honor the 116,708 Americans killed in WWI. The closest that the nation’s capital comes is the District of Columbia War Memorial -- an understated marble structure that enshrines the names of nearly 500 Washingtonians killed in “the war to end all wars.” 960 1280

Cliff, flickr   

Born to former slaves in South Carolina, Mary McLeod Bethune rose to become an American education and civil rights leader. This statue of her in D.C.’s Lincoln Park is inscribed with her last will and testament: “I leave you love. I love you hope...” 960 1280

Daniel Lobo, flickr  

Overlooking the city he helped lay out, the Benjamin Banneker Park and Memorial in southwest D.C. honors the self-taught African-American astronomer and surveyor who helped survey the future US capital in 1791. 960 1280

FinsUp0531, flickr   

The president who ensured that future generations would have national parks to enjoy is, fittingly, honored in a bucolic setting of his own: the Theodore Roosevelt Island National Memorial, on an 88.5-acre island beside the Potomac River. 960 1280

dctourism, flickr   

Every May, during National Police Week, thousands of officers and survivors visit the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial; it honors the 19,000 individuals who have died in the line of duty. 960 1280

Elvert Barnes, flickr   

The Victims of Communism Memorial honors its victims, both known and unknown. It was dedicated on June 12, 2007, the 20th anniversary of Ronald Reagan’s “tear down this wall” speech in front of the Berlin Wall. 960 1280

Prince Roy, flickr  

The Civil War was fought in D.C., too. The Battle of Fort Stevens occurred in the district’s northwest quadrant on July 11-12, 1864. Years later, this memorial was dedicated to honor the men of the 25th NY Volunteer Cavalry, who died in battle. Get more info about The Capital City. Check out our Travel Guide to Washington, D.C. 960 1280

Joshua Kranzberg  

See Episode Guide

Watch It

View Full TV Schedule

On TV

Ride-iculous

Bull Riding

8:30amam | 7:30amc

Big Time RV

Million Dollar RV

9:30amam | 8:30amc

Big Time RV

A $100,000 Dishwasher

10:30amam | 9:30amc

Big Time RV

Beds not Brawn

11:30amam | 10:30amc

The Hot List

Explore America’s most stunning scenery.
Join the conversation on Social Media!
Stay updated on the latest travel tips and trends.
Follow Us Everywhere

Join the party! Don't miss Travel Channel in your favorite social media feeds.