Show Extras

Madison Street Bridge
Madison Street Bridge

Madison Street Bridge

In the Windy City, the Madison Street Bridge covers the entire width of the Chicago River. But beneath this unassuming river crossing, a baffling aquatic artifact was uncovered that forced the public to question whether the discovery was genuine or the product of an elaborate hoax. 960 1280

  

Bare-knuckled Prize Fight

Bare-knuckled Prize Fight

Just outside of Hattiesburg, MS, sits this curious and diminutive structure. It was on these isolated plots of land that a war of sorts was fought, with only fists as weapons. This monument pays tribute to the bare-knuckled prize fight of 1889, the last of its kind. 960 1280

  

America's First Spy Ring

America's First Spy Ring

This bronzed eagle represents the veterans of foreign wars and is situated in the Litchfield, CT, Town Green Square. It is a monument that stands to honor the lives of General George Washington and his secret spy operation, known as the Culper Ring, which successfully uncovered a plot by the British to counterfeit colonial money. 960 1280

  

Aurora, TX

Aurora, TX

In the tiny cattle-farming town of Aurora, TX, is a 10-acre cemetery with close to 800 graves. But near the entrance of this old burial ground is a peculiar marker. It marks the final resting place of an otherworldly visitor who lies within the Aurora Cemetery. 960 1280

  

Aurora, Texas

Aurora, Texas

Despite its size, the Aurora Cemetery is a national landmark, and it boasts an occupant who has caused a colossal stir within this diminutive Texas city. 960 1280

  

Litchfield, CT

Litchfield, CT

Founded in 1719, Litchfield, CT, pre-dates the birth of the United States and stands as a testament to a colonial village seeped in history. The Culper Spy Ring remains the first and arguably the most successful spy operation in America’s rich past. This sign outside of the house of Benjamin Tallmadge pays homage to the remarkable story of the organization's groundbreaking methods of espionage that are still utilized to this day. 960 1280

  

America's First Spy Ring

America's First Spy Ring

This 3-story home in Connecticut has 2 columned porches and a gambrel roof, but it was more than just a home for an American colonist; it was once the former household of a Revolutionary that pioneered espionage as we know it. 960 1280

  

Roosevelt's Moroccan Mission

Roosevelt's Moroccan Mission

The USS Olympia, the oldest surviving steel warship in the United States, was once commanded by Theodore Roosevelt. But it was her role in a little-known, intimate affair of intrigue on a foreign shore that perhaps reveals the most about the character of her long-time Commander. 960 1280

  

New York City Police

New York City Police

Reminiscent of a cathedral or a Parisian palace, this landmark was once the headquarters of the New York City Police Department. Some of the best crime stories to come out of this city started within the walls of this building, but none as incredible as the story of one of the city’s most inscrutable con artists. 960 1280

  

Hack House
The House That Sugar Built

The House That Sugar Built

In 1883, a chemist named Henry Friend claims to have invented a process that would forever change the time-consuming and expensive sugar-refining industry, but his whole process is revealed to be a fraud.  When he falls ill and passes away, his wife Olive moves back to their hometown of Milan, IL, and builds a sprawling Victorian mansion.  960 1280

  

The House That Sugar Built

The House That Sugar Built

The home that sugar built, now known as Hack House and listed on the National Historic register, stands as a monument to the huckster’s sweet swindle in Milan, MI.  Two stories tall with a gable roof, this home provided a haven for a family whose success was built on a business deal that was so sweet it was impossible for some to resist. 960 1280

  

The Philadelphia Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment

Now a thriving 1,200-acre industrial campus, the Philadelphia Navy Yard once produced some of the US Navy’s greatest battleships.  Some believe this was also the site of a covert government experiment that defied the laws of physics. 960 1280

  

The Philadelphia Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment

In 1943, the USS Eldridge is said to have disappeared and reappeared out of thin air.  In an effort to protect their clumsy, slow moving destroyers from Nazi U-boats, the US Navy set up electromagnetic fields around the Eldridge. But when the ship’s generators are flipped on, a mysterious green fog engulfs the Eldridge.  The fantastical details of "The Philadelphia Experiment" continues to be one of the most enduring conspiracy theories of the modern age. 960 1280

  

Kill Dozer

Kill Dozer

In 2004, 52-year-old Marvin Heemeyer outfits a bulldozer with reinforced steel and heavy weaponry.  He rampages through the town of Granby for several hours while police stand by helpless.  Once he’s identified as the driver, it’s revealed that Heemeyer had a long standing resentment against the city government regarding a zoning issue that affected the muffler shop he owned.  960 1280

  

Servant Girl Serial Killer

Servant Girl Serial Killer

After numerous servant girls are found murdered in Austin, TX, the people of the city desperately search for ways to make the city safer.  So in 1895, 31-colossal light towers are constructed, placed around the city and become known as the Moonlight Towers. They cast 6,400 watts of bright light that spreads out over 3,000 feet, enveloping the city in its protective radiance. 960 1280

  

Servant Girl Serial Killer

Servant Girl Serial Killer

Looming above this eclectic metropolis are 17 mysterious yet colossal structures that nearly scrape the skies above.  The Moonlight Towers stand 165 feet tall, weigh about 5,000 pounds and are each topped with 6 mercury-vapor bulbs. According to local legend, the inspiration for these towers came from the darkest era in the city’s history. 960 1280

  

Cherry Mine Disaster

Cherry Mine Disaster

In 1909, Cherry, IL, witnesses one of the worst mining disasters in US history.  A fire in the town’s mine traps 259 men and boys within.  Only 22 men survive the ordeal, led by George Eddy.  After 8 days of darkness and dissipating oxygen, the men break out of the tomb, and they are miraculously met with a rescue party.  960 1280

  

Cherry Mine Disaster

Cherry Mine Disaster

In Cherry’s town cemetery, 2 tall, pyramid-shaped slabs of reddish marble, each etched with row upon row of long-forgotten names, sit on display.  Wedged between both is a gray and black industrial scene capped by the Illinois state and US flags. 960 1280

  

Rocking Chair Riots

Rocking Chair Riots

In 1901, British entrepreneur Oscar Spate presents the idea of using chic wicker-cushioned rocking chairs in Central Park instead of park benches. For 5 cents, the customer would have the right to relax in the chair for as long as they’d like between the hours of 10 am and 10 pm.  But when park-goers are told that they have to pay to sit in the shady area of the park, a full-scale riot occurs.  960 1280

  

Beacon Hill
Escape From Slavery

Escape From Slavery

On the north side of Boston, sitting along a narrow cobblestone street, is a regal and admirable mansion. Built in 1833, 66 Philips Street was considered one of the most expensive mansions in Beacon Hill, MA. The sophisticated structure features 4 grand stories with a red brick facade and delicate square windows decorated with wooden shutters. Today, it’s a private house, but it remains 1 of 14 sites on the Beacon Hill Black Heritage Trail where tour groups walk by daily to learn the amazing story of how this house became the scene for one of the most riveting talks of the time. 960 1280

  

Escape From Slavery

Escape From Slavery

The Hayden House is known as an Underground Railroad station that sheltered slave fugitives on the run. In 1848, Ellen and William Craft escaped from Macon, GA, to the Hayden House. When the Fugitive Slave Act was passed in 1850, Ellen went into hiding and William remained at the Hayden House. Lewis Hayden threatened to blow up the house if any captured slave stepped foot on the grounds. The tactic worked, and Ellen and William were able to marry at the Hayden House. 960 1280

  

The Cloudbuster

The Cloudbuster

Mount Lemmon in the Coronado National Forest near Tucson, AZ, rises more than 9,000 feet above sea level, and the peak can be buried under 57 inches of snow a year, which makes it a magnet for skiers. But, it’s actually the lack of precipitation of a different kind that once inspired a dreamer to come here on a seemingly impossible mission. 960 1280

  

The Cloudbuster

The Cloudbuster

In 1954, Dr. Wilhelm Reich came to this church in Tucson, AZ, with his “Cloudbuster” machine to help end a 4-year drought. He spent more than a month pointing the pipes of his device at the sky and drawing “deadly orgone” energy out of the sky. With the skies “unblocked,” rain clouds gradually started to appear. By December 10, a steady rain began to fall in the Arizona desert. Reich felt he had proved that his “Cloudbuster” really could draw rain from the skies, but scientists and the government were not convinced. They declared Reich to be at best a madman who’d happened to be in the right place at the right time for it to rain and, at worst, a man who was deliberately raising false hopes in his inventions in order to make money. 960 1280

  

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

This church in Holmdel, NJ, is where 2 Bell Lab scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, began researching a massive horn antennae. They discovered the antenna picked up a constant hum that interfered with incoming signals, but couldn’t find any reason for its existence. It was not until they were referred to Princeton physicist Robert Dicke that they began to unravel the mystery. Dicke had a theory that a “big bang” explosion created the universe, and the left over energy was still detectable at very low levels. Penzias and Wilson discovered that this hum was indeed leftover energy -- accidentally confirming the big bang theory. 960 1280

  

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

This odd-looking device positioned in the middle of a clearing at Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ, stands 30 feet tall and 50 feet long. It’s primarily made of aluminum and weighs 18 tons. The device sits upon a steel turntable that allows it to swivel in all directions. This bizarre piece of equipment was built to make our everyday lives easier, but inadvertently revolutionized what we think of humanity’s place in the universe. 960 1280

  

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

In 1897, a small horned lizard known as “Old Rip” was placed inside a time capsule at the Eastland County Courthouse in Texas. Thirty-one years later, the capsule was opened and Old Rip was found alive and well. The lizard became a celebrity, but there are many cynics who believe it wasn’t possible. No one ever admitted to switching the lizards before the capsule was opened. 960 1280

  

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

Eleven months after his unveiling, Old Rip died of pneumonia. The lizard’s body was preserved and stored in a custom casket that is on display outside the Eastland County Courthouse. In 1973, his body went missing and a ransom note was found. Someone was demanding that town officials admit that they switched the lizards when the capsule was first opened. Old Rip’s body was never found, but it was replaced with a new one that people from all over the state still come to visit. 960 1280

  

The Real Arsenic and Old Lace

The Real Arsenic and Old Lace

A look at the entrance of Hillside Cemetery in Cheshire, CT, where a key piece of evidence was found in the case of The Real Arsenic and Old Lace. Carl Goslee, a full-time insurance man and part-time investigative reporter, was convinced that Amy Archer was a mass murderer. An alarming number of residents at her Home for Aged People had passed away with no explanation. When patient, Franklin R. Andrews’ sister went to him to inform him that Archer had been pressuring her brother for money, Goslee finally had the essence of motive. He was able to exhume the body of Andrews and show that Archer had been feeding him large amounts of arsenic to collect his life insurance policy. 960 1280

  

Bushwick, Brooklyn
Blind Tom

Blind Tom

Thomas Greene Wiggins was an autistic savant who had an encyclopedic memory, which contributed to his phenomenal skill with the piano. After being enslaved for most of his life and forced to tour the countryside playing shows to provide income for his owner, Wiggins was finally freed in 1887. His mother, Charity, was able to win his legal guardianship back and “Blind Tom” was celebrated and revered within the black community. The final resting place of Wiggins is in Bushwick, Brooklyn. 960 1280

  

Blind Tom

Blind Tom

In the Evergreens Cemetery, to the west of a park, lies the tombstone of Thomas Greene Wiggins. Standing 2.5 feet tall by 2 feet wide, the solid granite tombstone features an engraved image of a man in a tuxedo and a brief memorial inscription. The man who is interred here displayed a surprising and unequalled talent in spite of his challenging childhood. 960 1280

  

Female Fliers

Female Fliers

Standing 8 feet high, this bronze lady wears a mechanic suit and goggles that rest jauntily on her head as she gazes up at the sky. This woman is Jackie Cochran, a former shampoo girl from Neillsville, WI, who had big dreams. In August 1943, Cochran established the Women Airforce Service Pilots -- or WASPS. Cochran became director of Woman’s Flying Training for the US and started a cadet flight school for female pilots. They delivered planes from factories to military bases and departure points across the country and tested newly overhauled planes and targets to give ground and air gunners training shooting. 960 1280

  

Female Fliers

Female Fliers

The historic hometown of Jackie Cochran includes the Wisconsin Pavilion from the 1964 World’s Fair and the castle-like Clark County Jail. In 1977, the WASPS military files were finally opened and for the first time, academics and researchers are privy to the role these women played in the war effort. They were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2009. A bronze statue of Jackie Cochran was erected in Neillsville, WI. 960 1280

  

Frisco War

Frisco War

With less than 400 residents, Reserve, NM, had just 2 grocery stores, a hardware store, a bar and a fairground. In 1884, Sheriff Elfego Baca withstood a 33-hour shootout with cowboys who were out for revenge. After Baca imprisoned one of their crew, the cowboys tracked him down and began one of the longest shootouts in history. Baca was able to hide in a makeshift bunker and return fire until the deputy in town intervened. 960 1280

  

Frisco War

Frisco War

A statue of Sheriff Elfego Baca was built in honor of his bravest moments of the Frisco War, the most shocking – and longest – unequal civilian gunfight ever recorded in the Wild West’s colorful history. After surviving the 33-hour gunfight against a gang of cowboys, Baca went on to become a criminal lawyer, district attorney and even chief bouncer at a Prohibition era gambling house in Juarez, Mexico. He lived to the ripe age of 84 and died of natural causes in 1945. 960 1280

  

Grandaddy of Snowboarding

Grandaddy of Snowboarding

An 18-foot-tall sinuous ribbon of shiny metal depicts a young girl on a strange contraption lunging down a flowing river, while another figure decked out in winter gear gazes up at her approach. This svelte and fluid bronze sculpture hints at an event that revolutionized winter sports and put Muskegon, MI, on the international map. 960 1280

  

Grandaddy of Snowboarding

Grandaddy of Snowboarding

Houses in the neighborhood where Sherman Poppen invented the first snowboard, which was known then as a “snurfer.” While playing outdoors with his daughters, Poppen got the idea to put 2 wooden skis together and ride sideways on them. The idea proved to be a hit, and the Brunswick Company began manufacturing snurfers for $15 each. The snurfer was re-envisioned in 1979 by Jake Burton Carpenter, who went on to create the modern day version of the snowboard. 960 1280

  

Tommy Gun Manor

Tommy Gun Manor

On the Kentucky side of the Ohio River is the Thompson House. This elegant, 19th century residence features a formal parlor, billiard room and imposing library. Built by British prisoners during the War of 1812, the mansion has since played an integral role in the region’s rich history. But this house was also the birthplace of a well-intentioned inventor whose creation took on a sinister life of its own. In 1918, John Thompson mass produced the Tommy Gun after originating the idea in the Thompson house. 960 1280

  

Honeymoon Island
Florida Three Toes

Florida Three Toes

More than 900,000 visitors cross the causeway each year to reach one of the Gulf Coast’s most relaxing barrier islands -- Honeymoon Island State Park in Dunedin, FL. Here, 4 miles of pristine shoreline lures sunbathers, swimmers and snorkelers alike. In 1948, traces were found here of an animal so unique and mysterious that it defied all scientific explanation and sparked a wave of intrigue that echoed for decades. 960 1280

  

Florida Three Toes

Florida Three Toes

In 1948, 3-toed footprints 14 inches long by 11 inches wide were found stamped deeply into the ground. Scottish cryptozoologist, Ivan Sanderson, was intrigued by the prints and began his own study of their authenticity. He believed the marks could be from a giant penguin 15 feet tall with webbed toes. This idea is later proved to be false by Tony Signorini, who informed the St. Petersburg Times that his friend had made iron casts of the feet. Together, they combed the beach and left the tracks as a playful prank.  960 1280

  

The Reanimator

The Reanimator

This institution was home to Dr. Robert E. Cornish, a fiercely ambitious child prodigy that graduated with honors from the University of California, Berkeley, at the ripe age of 18, and attained his doctorate 4 years later.  960 1280

  

The Reanimator

The Reanimator

A unique look at one of the buildings on the Berkeley campus where Dr. Cornish attempted to bring the dead back to life. His experiments on dead dogs proved that animals can be brought back to life. Though they suffer brain damage and blindness, the dogs were successfully brought back to life through a combination or adrenaline, blood-thinning agents and artificial breathing. Because of the dark nature of his experiments, Cornish was forced out of Berkeley and was publicly shunned by his scientific peers. 960 1280

  

Barefoot Bandit

Barefoot Bandit

Located near the western side of Orcas Island, WA, a sweeping estate known as Turtleback Mountain Preserve consists of nearly 16,000 acres of green forests, wetlands and open meadows. This land also played home to the "Barefoot Bandit," Colton Harris-Moore. Harris-Moore perfected his survival skills within the forests to such an amazing degree that even a massive search party could not locate him. He had intimate knowledge of which forest plants were edible, and was excellent at building fires and shelters. 960 1280

  

Barefoot Bandit

Barefoot Bandit

Colton Harris-Moore managed to stay hidden while a massive search party of FBI, state and federal SWAT teams combed the area for 14 hours. He was suspected of burglarizing numerous houses and stores in the area while barefoot. After 2 years and an international manhunt, Harris-Moore was finally caught in the Bahamas. In that time he stole 11 boats, 14 cars and 5 airplanes. 960 1280

  

Cigar Girl Murder

Cigar Girl Murder

A marble arch that protects a curious man-made arrangement of nature known as Sybil’s Cave in Hoboken, NJ, was once the site of a notorious tourist trap. This rocky patch is best known not for its rugged terrain, but for a horrifying incident that occurred in its shadow. This is the site where Manhattan’s first "it girl" is found after being beaten and drowned. Her death remains a mystery to this day.  960 1280

  

Cigar Girl Murder

Cigar Girl Murder

Mary Roger's body was found by 2 men walking along the shoreline near Sybil’s Cave in Hoboken, NJ. Suspicion was raised about her employer, John Anderson, who owned the shop where she became famous for her beauty. Her fiance, Daniel Payne, was also accused but was backed by a solid alibi. Many believe Anderson murdered her because she rejected his romantic advances. Her story is viewed as one of the first celebrity murders the press ever sensationalized. 960 1280

  

Forgotten Epidemic

Forgotten Epidemic

The New York Academy of Medicine’s beautiful library features one of the world’s largest treasures of medical research, and in the 1920s it was home to an urgent effort to stem the tide of a devastating new epidemic. The work begun by Josephine Neal at the Academy, and continued by Dr. Oliver Sacks in the Bronx, led to a vast improvement for the lives of unlucky encephalitis lethargica victims, and eventually helped ease the suffering for millions of Parkinson’s sufferers throughout the world. 960 1280

  

The Man Who Invented Martians

The Man Who Invented Martians

Sitting atop a hill in Flagstaff, AZ, the giant white dome of the Lowell Observatory appears like a mushroom sprouting from the surrounding evergreens. Day and night, this strange edifice peers into the sky searching for cosmic anomalies. 960 1280

  

The Man Who Invented Martians

The Man Who Invented Martians

In 1894, mathematician and informal astronomer, Percival Lowell, arrived at the largely unpopulated area of Flagstaff, AZ. On a mesa in an opening of the woods, he set up 2 telescopes for nighttime viewing inside a rudimentary observatory. Lowell’s theories on Martians spawned countless books, movies and a culture that has generated billions, if not trillions, of dollars. This observatory also went on to discover the planet Pluto. 960 1280

  

Superman vs. the KKK

Superman vs. the KKK

960 1280

  

Superman vs. the KKK

Superman vs. the KKK

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Texas Fever

Texas Fever

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Texas Fever

Texas Fever

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Who Killed Huey Long?

Who Killed Huey Long?

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Who Killed Huey Long?

Who Killed Huey Long?

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Black Hills National Forest

Black Hills National Forest

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Black Hills National Forest

Black Hills National Forest

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The Oracle of The Ages

The Oracle of The Ages

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Marches to Montgomery

Marches to Montgomery

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Marches to Montgomery

Marches to Montgomery

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See Episode Guide

Watch It

  • Chrysler Building
    Don Wildman visits one of New York City’s most iconic skyscrapers and explores an unsolved murder mystery that rocked one of the country’s most esteemed universities.
    Thursday December 4
    11am | 10c
  • American Venus, Alien Abduction, Buffalo Wings
    Don Wildman examines a set of statues that represent a muse whose beauty inspired a crime of passion, visits a forest that was the site of a possible alien abduction and explores the origin of buffalo wings.
    Thursday December 4
    12pm | 11c
  • Lucy the Elephant
    Don Wildman encounters a majestic mammoth that boasts an incredible tale of survival; investigates an iconic landmark that was at the center of terrifying explosive attacks; and unveils an abandoned camp with a sinister past.
    Sunday December 7
    8am | 7c
  • Kidnapping The Sacred Cod, Baseball's Forgotten Hero, The Artichoke War
    Host Don Wildman investigates the fishy disappearance of a sacred effigy; explores the truth behind the first African-American baseball player; and examines the statue of a New York mayor.
    Sunday December 7
    9am | 8c
  • The Reanimator, Florida Three Toes, The Man Who Invented Martians
    Host Don Wildman explores the University of California Berkeley where a scientist once tried to play God; investigates the tale of a Godzilla-like creature; and explains how an observatory's namesake changed our perception of life.
    Thursday December 11
    11am | 10c
  • Devil's Music, Fisherman's Wharf, Alaska Triangle Hale Boggs
    Don Wildman visits the spot where a legendary bluesman made a deal with the devil, examines a city wharf that lead to a case of fraud, and explores a National Forest where 2 of the country's most powerful men vanished.
    Thursday December 11
    12pm | 11c
  • St. Urho, Mystery Castle, Bat Bombs
    Don Wildman investigates a sculpture of a suspicious saint with a dubious past; visits a fortress at the center of a strange tale of secrecy, discovery, and death; and explores spectacular caverns and its multitude of bats.
    Sunday December 14
    8am | 7c
  • The Mystery of Captain Thunderbolt, Newsboy's versus The World, The Rocket Man
    Host Don Wildman unmasks the story of a mysterious former scholar of the Round Schoolhouse in Vermont; explores the David and Goliath tale of New York's newsboys; and explores a life-sized bronze statue of a pioneering explorer.
    Sunday December 14
    9am | 8c
  • Mike The Headless Chicken, The Mystery Of Boon Island, Sister Aimee's Scandal
    Host Don Wildman examines an unusual sculpture of a death-defying creature; gazes upon a lonely outpost built atop an island that witnessed unspeakable horrors; and explores a spectacular park linked to a preacher.
    Sunday December 21
    8am | 7c
  • Kecksburg Space Acorn, Skyscraper Swindle, Emperor of the US
    Don Wildman inspects a bizarre acorn-shaped sculpture that commemorates an otherworldly event; explores the world's smallest skyscraper that was once at the center of an outrageous scam; and investigates an engineering wonder inspired by an eccentric figure.
    Sunday December 21
    9am | 8c
  • Superman vs. the KKK, Who killed Huey Long?, Marches To Montgomery
    Host Don Wildman explores a colossal mountain where a hero in disguise took on the KKK; investigates the grave of politician Huey Long; and takes in a bridge that found itself at the center of the struggle for civil rights.
    Sunday December 28
    8am | 7c
  • The King And The Spanish Dancer, A Communist Comes To America, Filth Party
    Host Don Wildman explores the former home of a mysterious dancer that cost a Bavarian king his home, a 16-foot statue of Vladimir Lenin and a disease once studied by a scientist who used himself as a lab rat.
    Sunday December 28
    9am | 8c

About the Show

Hosted by Don Wildman, this series scours the country for America’s most extraordinary monuments and reveals the amazing mysteries hidden within.

Monumental Mysteries

About the Host

Don Wildman shows us the secrets lurking in museums and monuments across the United States.

Don Wildman's Bio

Monumental Mysteries Scour the country for America's most extraordinary monuments and reveal the amazing mysteries hidden within.
Don Wildman

Photo Galleries

Madison Street Bridge

Madison Street Bridge

In the Windy City, the Madison Street Bridge covers the entire width of the Chicago River. But beneath this unassuming river crossing, a baffling aquatic artifact was uncovered that forced the public to question whether the discovery was genuine or the product of an elaborate hoax. 960 1280

  

Bare-knuckled Prize Fight

Bare-knuckled Prize Fight

Just outside of Hattiesburg, MS, sits this curious and diminutive structure. It was on these isolated plots of land that a war of sorts was fought, with only fists as weapons. This monument pays tribute to the bare-knuckled prize fight of 1889, the last of its kind. 960 1280

  

America's First Spy Ring

America's First Spy Ring

This bronzed eagle represents the veterans of foreign wars and is situated in the Litchfield, CT, Town Green Square. It is a monument that stands to honor the lives of General George Washington and his secret spy operation, known as the Culper Ring, which successfully uncovered a plot by the British to counterfeit colonial money. 960 1280

  

Aurora, TX

Aurora, TX

In the tiny cattle-farming town of Aurora, TX, is a 10-acre cemetery with close to 800 graves. But near the entrance of this old burial ground is a peculiar marker. It marks the final resting place of an otherworldly visitor who lies within the Aurora Cemetery. 960 1280

  

Aurora, Texas

Aurora, Texas

Despite its size, the Aurora Cemetery is a national landmark, and it boasts an occupant who has caused a colossal stir within this diminutive Texas city. 960 1280

  

Litchfield, CT

Litchfield, CT

Founded in 1719, Litchfield, CT, pre-dates the birth of the United States and stands as a testament to a colonial village seeped in history. The Culper Spy Ring remains the first and arguably the most successful spy operation in America’s rich past. This sign outside of the house of Benjamin Tallmadge pays homage to the remarkable story of the organization's groundbreaking methods of espionage that are still utilized to this day. 960 1280

  

America's First Spy Ring

America's First Spy Ring

This 3-story home in Connecticut has 2 columned porches and a gambrel roof, but it was more than just a home for an American colonist; it was once the former household of a Revolutionary that pioneered espionage as we know it. 960 1280

  

Roosevelt's Moroccan Mission

Roosevelt's Moroccan Mission

The USS Olympia, the oldest surviving steel warship in the United States, was once commanded by Theodore Roosevelt. But it was her role in a little-known, intimate affair of intrigue on a foreign shore that perhaps reveals the most about the character of her long-time Commander. 960 1280

  

New York City Police

New York City Police

Reminiscent of a cathedral or a Parisian palace, this landmark was once the headquarters of the New York City Police Department. Some of the best crime stories to come out of this city started within the walls of this building, but none as incredible as the story of one of the city’s most inscrutable con artists. 960 1280

  

The House That Sugar Built

The House That Sugar Built

In 1883, a chemist named Henry Friend claims to have invented a process that would forever change the time-consuming and expensive sugar-refining industry, but his whole process is revealed to be a fraud.  When he falls ill and passes away, his wife Olive moves back to their hometown of Milan, IL, and builds a sprawling Victorian mansion.  960 1280

  

The House That Sugar Built

The House That Sugar Built

The home that sugar built, now known as Hack House and listed on the National Historic register, stands as a monument to the huckster’s sweet swindle in Milan, MI.  Two stories tall with a gable roof, this home provided a haven for a family whose success was built on a business deal that was so sweet it was impossible for some to resist. 960 1280

  

The Philadelphia Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment

Now a thriving 1,200-acre industrial campus, the Philadelphia Navy Yard once produced some of the US Navy’s greatest battleships.  Some believe this was also the site of a covert government experiment that defied the laws of physics. 960 1280

  

The Philadelphia Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment

In 1943, the USS Eldridge is said to have disappeared and reappeared out of thin air.  In an effort to protect their clumsy, slow moving destroyers from Nazi U-boats, the US Navy set up electromagnetic fields around the Eldridge. But when the ship’s generators are flipped on, a mysterious green fog engulfs the Eldridge.  The fantastical details of "The Philadelphia Experiment" continues to be one of the most enduring conspiracy theories of the modern age. 960 1280

  

Kill Dozer

Kill Dozer

In 2004, 52-year-old Marvin Heemeyer outfits a bulldozer with reinforced steel and heavy weaponry.  He rampages through the town of Granby for several hours while police stand by helpless.  Once he’s identified as the driver, it’s revealed that Heemeyer had a long standing resentment against the city government regarding a zoning issue that affected the muffler shop he owned.  960 1280

  

Servant Girl Serial Killer

Servant Girl Serial Killer

After numerous servant girls are found murdered in Austin, TX, the people of the city desperately search for ways to make the city safer.  So in 1895, 31-colossal light towers are constructed, placed around the city and become known as the Moonlight Towers. They cast 6,400 watts of bright light that spreads out over 3,000 feet, enveloping the city in its protective radiance. 960 1280

  

Servant Girl Serial Killer

Servant Girl Serial Killer

Looming above this eclectic metropolis are 17 mysterious yet colossal structures that nearly scrape the skies above.  The Moonlight Towers stand 165 feet tall, weigh about 5,000 pounds and are each topped with 6 mercury-vapor bulbs. According to local legend, the inspiration for these towers came from the darkest era in the city’s history. 960 1280

  

Cherry Mine Disaster

Cherry Mine Disaster

In 1909, Cherry, IL, witnesses one of the worst mining disasters in US history.  A fire in the town’s mine traps 259 men and boys within.  Only 22 men survive the ordeal, led by George Eddy.  After 8 days of darkness and dissipating oxygen, the men break out of the tomb, and they are miraculously met with a rescue party.  960 1280

  

Cherry Mine Disaster

Cherry Mine Disaster

In Cherry’s town cemetery, 2 tall, pyramid-shaped slabs of reddish marble, each etched with row upon row of long-forgotten names, sit on display.  Wedged between both is a gray and black industrial scene capped by the Illinois state and US flags. 960 1280

  

Rocking Chair Riots

Rocking Chair Riots

In 1901, British entrepreneur Oscar Spate presents the idea of using chic wicker-cushioned rocking chairs in Central Park instead of park benches. For 5 cents, the customer would have the right to relax in the chair for as long as they’d like between the hours of 10 am and 10 pm.  But when park-goers are told that they have to pay to sit in the shady area of the park, a full-scale riot occurs.  960 1280

  

Escape From Slavery

Escape From Slavery

On the north side of Boston, sitting along a narrow cobblestone street, is a regal and admirable mansion. Built in 1833, 66 Philips Street was considered one of the most expensive mansions in Beacon Hill, MA. The sophisticated structure features 4 grand stories with a red brick facade and delicate square windows decorated with wooden shutters. Today, it’s a private house, but it remains 1 of 14 sites on the Beacon Hill Black Heritage Trail where tour groups walk by daily to learn the amazing story of how this house became the scene for one of the most riveting talks of the time. 960 1280

  

Escape From Slavery

Escape From Slavery

The Hayden House is known as an Underground Railroad station that sheltered slave fugitives on the run. In 1848, Ellen and William Craft escaped from Macon, GA, to the Hayden House. When the Fugitive Slave Act was passed in 1850, Ellen went into hiding and William remained at the Hayden House. Lewis Hayden threatened to blow up the house if any captured slave stepped foot on the grounds. The tactic worked, and Ellen and William were able to marry at the Hayden House. 960 1280

  

The Cloudbuster

The Cloudbuster

Mount Lemmon in the Coronado National Forest near Tucson, AZ, rises more than 9,000 feet above sea level, and the peak can be buried under 57 inches of snow a year, which makes it a magnet for skiers. But, it’s actually the lack of precipitation of a different kind that once inspired a dreamer to come here on a seemingly impossible mission. 960 1280

  

The Cloudbuster

The Cloudbuster

In 1954, Dr. Wilhelm Reich came to this church in Tucson, AZ, with his “Cloudbuster” machine to help end a 4-year drought. He spent more than a month pointing the pipes of his device at the sky and drawing “deadly orgone” energy out of the sky. With the skies “unblocked,” rain clouds gradually started to appear. By December 10, a steady rain began to fall in the Arizona desert. Reich felt he had proved that his “Cloudbuster” really could draw rain from the skies, but scientists and the government were not convinced. They declared Reich to be at best a madman who’d happened to be in the right place at the right time for it to rain and, at worst, a man who was deliberately raising false hopes in his inventions in order to make money. 960 1280

  

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

This church in Holmdel, NJ, is where 2 Bell Lab scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, began researching a massive horn antennae. They discovered the antenna picked up a constant hum that interfered with incoming signals, but couldn’t find any reason for its existence. It was not until they were referred to Princeton physicist Robert Dicke that they began to unravel the mystery. Dicke had a theory that a “big bang” explosion created the universe, and the left over energy was still detectable at very low levels. Penzias and Wilson discovered that this hum was indeed leftover energy -- accidentally confirming the big bang theory. 960 1280

  

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

The Horn That Made A Big Bang

This odd-looking device positioned in the middle of a clearing at Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ, stands 30 feet tall and 50 feet long. It’s primarily made of aluminum and weighs 18 tons. The device sits upon a steel turntable that allows it to swivel in all directions. This bizarre piece of equipment was built to make our everyday lives easier, but inadvertently revolutionized what we think of humanity’s place in the universe. 960 1280

  

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

In 1897, a small horned lizard known as “Old Rip” was placed inside a time capsule at the Eastland County Courthouse in Texas. Thirty-one years later, the capsule was opened and Old Rip was found alive and well. The lizard became a celebrity, but there are many cynics who believe it wasn’t possible. No one ever admitted to switching the lizards before the capsule was opened. 960 1280

  

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

The Legend Of Ol' Rip

Eleven months after his unveiling, Old Rip died of pneumonia. The lizard’s body was preserved and stored in a custom casket that is on display outside the Eastland County Courthouse. In 1973, his body went missing and a ransom note was found. Someone was demanding that town officials admit that they switched the lizards when the capsule was first opened. Old Rip’s body was never found, but it was replaced with a new one that people from all over the state still come to visit. 960 1280

  

The Real Arsenic and Old Lace

The Real Arsenic and Old Lace

A look at the entrance of Hillside Cemetery in Cheshire, CT, where a key piece of evidence was found in the case of The Real Arsenic and Old Lace. Carl Goslee, a full-time insurance man and part-time investigative reporter, was convinced that Amy Archer was a mass murderer. An alarming number of residents at her Home for Aged People had passed away with no explanation. When patient, Franklin R. Andrews’ sister went to him to inform him that Archer had been pressuring her brother for money, Goslee finally had the essence of motive. He was able to exhume the body of Andrews and show that Archer had been feeding him large amounts of arsenic to collect his life insurance policy. 960 1280