Chowchilla Kidnapping and the Texas City Disaster

Get a look at Evel Knievel’s Harley-Davidson, the schoolbus involved in a heinous crime and artifacts from a terrible industrial accident.
Related To:

A shoe that was found on the day of the Texas City Disaster on display at the Texas City Museum. The April 16, 1947, incident was the deadliest industrial accident in US history, and killed almost 600 people.

At the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum Heritage Society in Key West, FL, archaeologist Corey Malcolm discusses bezoar stones -- once believed to be an antidote to any poison.

Infamous daredevil Evel Knievel’s Harley-Davidson motorcycle on display at the Smithsonian Museum of American History in Washington, DC. Knievel successfully jumped over 14 Greyhound buses on the bike.

At the Museum of the City of New York is a strange artifact -- an invitation to a laughing gas party.

A bezoar stone on display at the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum.

At Bright's Pioneer Exhibit in Le Grand, CA, is an ordinary yellow schoolbus that became ensnared in a crime so heinous that it would devastate an entire community.

A turn-of-the-century toy exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York.

Bright’s Pioneer Exhibit owner James Bright on the schoolbus that was part of the largest kidnapping for ransom in US history.

A gold poison cup on display at the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum.

The Texas City Park in Texas City, TX.

A model of Atocha, a Spanish ship that sank in 1622 off the Florida Keys, on display at the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum.

Large bars of silver that were recovered from the sunken Spanish ship.

Museum curator Sarah Henry holds an artifact at the Museum of the City of New York.