Siamese Twins, Assassin Umbrella, Capone's Cell

See the death case of siamese twins Cheng and Eng, the Georgi Markov umbrella that played a role in a Cold War assassination and Al Capone's haunted cell in Eastern State Penitentiary.

Photos

Humming fish on display at the California Academy of Science, San Francisco, CA. 960 1280

  

The crew shoot reenactments of the houseboats where the humming fish were causing a disturbance in Sausalito, CA. 960 1280

  

A piece of the Exxon-Valdez wreck is on display at the Valdez Museum in Valdez, AK. 960 1280

  

Entry sign at the National UDT-SEAL Museum in Fort Pierce, FL. 960 1280

  

Tropical fish tank on display at the California Academy of Science, San Francisco, CA. 960 1280

  

Rifle used by Alfred Packer at the Museum of the West, Grand Junction, CO. 960 1280

  

Various displays at the National UDT-SEAL Museum in Fort Pierce, FL. 960 1280

  

The outside of the Valdez Museum in Valdez, AK. 960 1280

  

Dinosaur bones on display at the California Academy of Science, San Francisco, CA. 960 1280

  

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Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley

The Autry National Center in Los Angeles is the final resting place of the famed Annie Oakley's pistols. Born Phoebe Ann Moses, Annie was a natural marksman and entered a shooting contest at the age of 15, beating out her eventual husband, Frank Butler. 960 1280

  

Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley

These pistols are linked to a legendary love story that sparked the career of America’s first female superstar. Annie Oakley was a tough folk hero whose talent and unlikely romance propelled her to fame. 960 1280

  

Old State Prison Haunting

Old State Prison Haunting

The Old State Prison Museum in Deer Lodge, MT, has a pair of concrete shoes in its possession that were used to punish a convict placed in solitary confinement for his dastardly and horrific deeds. 960 1280

  

Old State Prison Haunting

Old State Prison Haunting

In the summer of 1958, Jerry Myles was convicted for robbing a hardware store and was sent to the Montana State Prison. After serving time in isolation for selling drugs and alcohol to other inmates, Myles attacked a guard, stole his rifle and proceeded to kill the warden and hold the prison hostage for 36 hours before committing suicide. 960 1280

  

Human Crash Test

Human Crash Test

The New Mexico Museum of Space History in Alamogordo, NM, displays a turbo-powered contraption that was involved in some of the most groundbreaking -- and life threatening -- experiments of the 20th century. 960 1280

  

Human Crash Test

Human Crash Test

This sonic wind crash sled, and the man who rode it in the name of science, revolutionized safety and the way Americans travel. 960 1280

  

Project Chariot

Project Chariot

The Museum of the North in Fairbanks, AK, has in its collection a reminder of one of the most disturbing projects ever proposed by the US government, as it reveals a stunning secret about an alarming atomic age experiment. 960 1280

  

Project Chariot

Project Chariot

The samples shown above are of the plant, lichen, which is a staple of the caribou diet and is unlike typical plants because it feeds on the dust from the air. After the government proposed to test nuclear explosives in Alaska, it was discovered that the planned location had the highest amounts of radiation in the world. 960 1280

  

Shackleton Expedition

Shackleton Expedition

Located on the campus of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH, the Rauner Special Collections Library has in its collection a frayed journal that survived an awe-inspiring journey in the Antarctic. 960 1280

  

Shackleton Expedition

Shackleton Expedition

In 1914, famed explorer Ernest Shackleton lead 28 men on an epic expedition, in an attempt to cross the entire frozen unchartered territory known as Antarctica. After months of being trapped by the surrounding ice, Shackleton ordered his men to abandon ship and embark on a journey that would later be compared to a trip to hell and back. 960 1280

  

Judgment of Paris

Judgment of Paris

In Washington, DC, the Smithsonian National Museum of American History has in its collection a wine bottle that represents an underdog tale of an unlikely upstart who revolutionized global tastes. 960 1280

  

Judgment of Paris

Judgment of Paris

For years, local California winemaker Warren Winiarski struggled to create a sophisticated California red wine -- but he proved his critics wrong, creating a wine that rivals some of the finest French Bordeaux in the world. 960 1280

  

Failed Assassination of JFK

Failed Assassination of JFK

The Belmont Public Library in New Hampshire has in its collection a small pin that was awarded for an immense act of heroism. In 1950, the pin was awarded to postmaster Thomas Murphy, who pieced together several postcards that were sent directly to him from a man named Richard Pavlick, including one that said, "Soon you'll be hearing from me in a big way." 960 1280

  

Failed Assassination of JFK

Failed Assassination of JFK

This miniscule item is connected to a thrilling tale of investigation and a devious plot that threatened to kill a member of the country’s most famous family. After getting a tip from Thomas Murphy, the police caught Pavlick in his car, staking out the church of John F. Kennedy with enough explosives in his trunk to blow up the entire block. 960 1280

  

Max Factor

Max Factor

The Hollywood Museum in California displays several items that were designed by a pioneer in the glamorous world of silver-screen beauty, Max Factor. 960 1280

  

Max Factor

Max Factor

In the early days of film, actors and actresses struggled with how to present themselves to the public. But then expert makeup artist Max Factor opened up the first cosmetic studio that attracted all of Hollywood's stars. 960 1280

  

Max Factor

Max Factor

In the 1930s, Factor’s studio was the place to be, and fans waited outside for hours just to catch a glimpse of their favorite stars. The Hollywood Museum contains a bizarre contraption that could be mistaken for a medieval torture device; however, the device was designed by Factor to use as a beauty calibrator. 960 1280

  

Martian Monkey

Martian Monkey

In Decatur, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Museum has preserved evidence of a strange being that some believed was evidence of a close encounter. News of its discovery caused a phenomenal reaction in the country, sparking a quest to uncover the truth behind its bizarre origins. 960 1280

  

Martian Monkey

Martian Monkey

On July 8, 1953, officer Shirley Brown was patrolling an isolated street in Atlanta when he came across 3 men standing over an odd beast. The creature was green, 2 feet long and had no hair. But it turned out to be a hoax concocted by those 3 men who made a bet to see if they could make the cover of the newspaper. 960 1280

  

Natural Born Killers

Natural Born Killers

In the capital city of Lincoln, the Nebraska History Museum displays a gun that triggered a terrifying series of events that gripped the nation, when 2 teenage lovers, Caril Ann Fugate and Charles Starkweather, went on one of the most horrific and infamous crime sprees in modern history. 960 1280

  

Shakespeare's Lost Plays

Shakespeare's Lost Plays

It was 1796 in London when an apparent treasure trove of unpublished manuscripts seemingly written by William Shakespeare were discovered. When one of the plays, “Vortigern and Rowena,” was performed for a live audience, it was an unmitigated disaster. Edmund Malone then wrote a 400-page, scathing review, calling the play a fake due to a litany of grammatical errors and historical inaccuracies. 960 1280

  

Shakespeare's Lost Plays

Shakespeare's Lost Plays

Samuel Ireland, the man who discovered the journals, refused to believe they were not actually written by Shakespeare himself and employed his son, William Henry Ireland, to disprove Malone's claim. About a week later, William Henry finally revealed to his father that he created the fake manuscripts himself. 960 1280

  

Dymaxion Car

Dymaxion Car

The National Automobile Museum in Reno, NV, displays an unconventional vehicle with a daring design that once promised to revolutionize the entire auto industry. With only 3 wheels and a teardrop shape, the car was inspired by vastly different modes of transportation. 960 1280

  

Dymaxion Car

Dymaxion Car

The Dymaxion car -- supposedly able to travel by land, sea and air -- only made its debut on the ground during Chicago's World Fair in 1933. Shortly after, the vehicle was involved in a controversial tragedy that devastated its famous inventor, Buckminster Fuller, and caused it to vanish from American highways forever. 960 1280