Liberty Bell Escape and Hidden Canyon Treasures

Brian Unger takes locals on an adventure to uncover the histories of 2 dramatically different landscapes. First, he shows them the bootlegged journey of the Liberty Bell through Pennsylvania; then, he travels to Arizona to explore the stories of the Grand Canyon’s past.

From This Episode

Ford’s Theatre Now

Ford’s Theatre Now

The alley behind Ford’s Theatre looks like just about every other alley in Washington, DC. But it holds a secret much more deadly. 960 1280

  

Ford's Theater Then

Ford's Theater Then

Knowing the ins and outs of Ford’s Theatre like the back of his hand, actor-turned-assassin John Wilkes Booth fled out this alleyway and off into the night on April 14, 1865, after killing President Lincoln. 960 1280

  

Samuel Cox House Now

Samuel Cox House Now

This abandoned home in southern Maryland may not look like much, but it played a large part in one of America’s saddest tragedies. 960 1280

  

Samuel Cox Home Then

Samuel Cox Home Then

In 1865, this is what the Samuel Cox home looked like — a large Colonial country house that backed up to the woods and thicket. It was here that John Wilkes Booth stayed for nearly a week after assassinating Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre. 960 1280

  

Fort McNair Now

Fort McNair Now

This group of tennis courts at Fort McNair in Washington, DC, might seem fairly standard — just a great place to get in some exercise. 960 1280

  

Fort McNair Then

Fort McNair Then

But in the days following the assassination of President Lincoln, this landing prepared for the eventual hanging of Booth’s accomplices. 960 1280

  

US Capitol Now

US Capitol Now

Today, the US Capitol Building stands as a tribute to the old capitol buildings of Europe. The tall columns, the rotunda and the iconic Statue of Freedom on top all symbolize the hardworking and proud nation that the structure represents. 960 1280

  

US Capitol Then

US Capitol Then

But it didn’t always look that way. It took years to construct the building and often seemed as though it would never be completed.  960 1280

  

Lincoln Memorial Now

Lincoln Memorial Now

The Lincoln Memorial stands as one of the most revered monuments in DC. Located at 1 end of the National Mall and Reflecting Pool, it looks like something you would find in ancient Rome. 960 1280

  

Lincoln Memorial Then

Lincoln Memorial Then

But it took a long while to determine where exactly this building was going to be constructed. Many objected to the current location because it was essentially in a swamp and surrounded by some pretty unpleasant scenery. 960 1280

  

Washington Monument Now

Washington Monument Now

Arguably the most recognizable building in the DC skyline, the Washington Monument was built as a memorial to the United States’ first president, George Washington.  960 1280

  

Washington Monument Then

Washington Monument Then

However, when it was being constructed, there were major delays, thanks to a lack of funding and the fact that it was surrounded by the swamp that DC was built on. Not exactly a destination worth visiting. 960 1280

  

Hollywood Now

Hollywood Now

Now a modern-day condo complex, this storefront used to be a celebrity hot spot. 960 1280

  

Hollywood then

Hollywood then

Back in Hollywood’s heyday, this was the location of the Brown Derby restaurant, which was a favorite late-night hangout for the Hollywood elite. 960 1280

  

Hollywood Hills Now

Hollywood Hills Now

This shot looking down onto Glendale Boulevard in Hollywood seems like nothing special — some buildings, warehouses and, most notably, a public storage facility. 960 1280

  

Hollywood Hills Then

Hollywood Hills Then

But in the early 20th century, this was a hotbed for the movie industry. This is where Keystone and Mack Sennett Studios were located and the place where Charlie Chaplin got his start in silent films. 960 1280

  

OK Corral Now

OK Corral Now

A major tourist destination today, the OK Corral has been restored for visitors to see and get a taste of the Wild West. 960 1280

  

OK Corral Then

OK Corral Then

In reality, the OK Corral was not the location of the infamous shoot-out in 1881. Instead, the contentious cowboys and lawmakers went down to a vacant lot on Fremont Street, a few blocks away, to square off. 960 1280

  

Tombstone Now

Tombstone Now

Much quieter than it has been in the past, Allen Street still acts as a main street for this tourist town in Arizona. 960 1280

  

Tombstone Then

Tombstone Then

Allen Street doesn’t look much different now than it did in 1881, shortly after the Earp brothers strolled into town to get into the gaming business while serving as the town’s law enforcement. 960 1280

  

Vegas Divorce Ranch Now

Vegas Divorce Ranch Now

Mostly a vacant parking lot surrounded by desert, this was once the spot of a famous ranch that helped Hollywood elite get quickie divorces. 960 1280

  

Vegas Divorce Ranch Then

Vegas Divorce Ranch Then

If you were looking to get unhitched, Las Vegas was your place. To promote business and tourism during the Great Depression, Nevada dropped its regulation from 1 year to 6 weeks to finalize a divorce. The old Boldorado Ranch was the first of its kind — a place where you could go to unwind and relax while waiting for a divorce.  960 1280

  

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